How much did Lance Armstrong admit to Oprah?

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How much did Lance Armstrong admit to Oprah?

From Comcast SportsNetAUSTIN, Texas(AP) --Lance Armstrong has finally come clean.The cyclist confessed to doping during an interview with Oprah Winfrey taped Monday, just a couple of hours after a wrenching apology to staff at the Livestrong charity he founded and has now been forced to surrender.The emotional day ended with 2 12 hours of questions from Winfrey, where she said the world's most famous cyclist was "forthcoming" as she asked him in detail about doping allegations that followed him throughout his seven Tour de France victories.Winfrey told CBS on Tuesday she had not planned to address Armstrong's confession before the interview aired on her OWN network Thursday but, "by the time I left Austin and landed in Chicago, you all had already confirmed it.""So I'm sitting here now because it's already been confirmed," she added.Winfrey said the interview will now run in two parts over two nights because there is so much material.Winfrey would not characterize whether Armstrong seemed contrite but said he seemed ready for the interview. "I would say he met the moment," she said.The confession was a stunning reversal for a proud athlete and celebrity who sought lavish praise and used courtrooms to punish his critics.For more than a decade, Armstrong dared anybody who challenged his version of events to prove it. Finally, he told the tale himself after promising over the weekend to answer Winfrey's questions "directly, honestly and candidly."The cyclist was stripped of his Tour titles, lost most of his endorsements and was forced to leave Livestrong last year after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency issued a damning, 1,000-page report that accused him of masterminding a long-running doping scheme.The International Cycling Union, or UCI, issued a statement on Tuesday saying it was aware of the reports that Armstrong had confessed to Winfrey. The governing body for the sport urged Armstrong to tell his story to an independent commission it has set up to examine claims it covered up suspicious samples from the cyclist, accepted financial donations from him and helped him avoid detection in doping tests.Armstrong started Monday with a visit to the headquarters of Livestrong, the charity he founded in 1997 and turned into a global force on the strength of his athletic dominance and personal story of surviving testicular cancer that had spread to his lungs and brain.Armstrong told staffers "I'm sorry." He choked up during a 20-minute talk, expressing regret for the long-running controversy tied to performance-enhancers had caused, but stopped short of admitting he used them.He urged them to continue the charity's mission, helping cancer patients and their families."Heartfelt and sincere," is how Livestrong spokeswoman Katherine McLane described his speech.Armstrong later huddled with almost a dozen people before stepping into the interview with Winfrey. The group included close friends and lawyers. They exchanged handshakes and smiles, but declined comment.Winfrey has promoted her interview as a "no-holds barred" session, and after the voluminous USADA report -- which included testimony from 11 former teammates -- she said she went into the session with 112 questions ready to go. Not all of them were asked, she said, but many were.USADA chief executive Travis Tygart, a longtime critic of Armstrong's, called the drug regimen practiced while Armstrong led the U.S. Postal Service team "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen." USADA did not respond to requests for comment about Armstrong's confession.For years, Armstrong went after his critics ruthlessly during his reign as cycling champion. He scolded some in public and didn't hesitate to punish outspoken riders during the race itself. He waged legal battles against still others in court.At least one of his opponents, the London-based Sunday Times, has already filed a lawsuit to recover about 500,000 it paid him to settle a libel case, and Texas-based SCA Promotions, which tried to deny Armstrong a promised bonus for a Tour de France win, has threatened to bring another lawsuit seeking to recover more than 7.5 million awarded by an arbitration panel.In Australia, the government of South Australia state said Tuesday it will seek the repayment of several million dollars in appearance fees paid to Armstrong for competing in the Tour Down Under in 2009, 2010 and 2011."We'd be more than happy for Mr. Armstrong to make any repayment of monies to us," South Australia Premier Jay Weatherill said.Betsy Andreu, the wife of former Armstrong teammate Frankie Andreu, was one of the first to publicly accuse Armstrong of using performance-enhancing drugs. She called news of Armstrong's confession "very emotional and very sad," and choked up when asked to comment."He used to be one of my husband's best friends and because he wouldn't go along with the doping, he got kicked to the side," she said. "Lance could have a positive impact if he tells the truth on everything. He's got to be completely honest."Betsy Andreu testified in SCA's arbitration case challenging the bonus in 2005, saying Armstrong admitted in an Indiana hospital room in 1996 that he had taken many performance-enhancing drugs, a claim Armstrong vehemently denied."It would be nice if he would come out and say the hospital room happened," Andreu said. "That's where it all started."Former teammate Floyd Landis, who was stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title for doping, has filed a federal whistleblower lawsuit that accused Armstrong of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service. An attorney familiar with Armstrong's legal problems told the AP that the Justice Department is highly likely to join the lawsuit. The False Claims Act lawsuit could result in Armstrong paying a substantial amount of money to the U.S. government. The deadline for the department to join the case is Thursday, though the department could seek an extension if necessary.According to the attorney, who works outside the government, the lawsuit alleges that Armstrong defrauded the U.S. government based on his years of denying use of performance-enhancing drugs. The attorney spoke on condition of anonymity because the source was not authorized to speak on the record about the matter.The lawsuit most likely to be influenced by a confession might be the Sunday Times case. Potential perjury charges stemming from Armstrong's sworn testimony in the 2005 arbitration fight would not apply because of the statute of limitations. Armstrong was not deposed during the federal investigation that was closed last year.Armstrong is said to be worth around 100 million. But most sponsors dropped him after USADA's scathing report -- at the cost of tens of millions of dollars -- and soon after, he left the board of Livestrong.After the USADA findings, he was also barred from competing in the elite triathlon or running events he participated in after his cycling career. World Anti-Doping Code rules state his lifetime ban cannot be reduced to less than eight years. WADA and U.S. Anti-Doping officials could agree to reduce the ban further depending on what information Armstrong provides and his level of cooperation.

Luis Robert will start journey through White Sox organization in Dominican Summer League

Luis Robert will start journey through White Sox organization in Dominican Summer League

Luis Robert is officially a member of the White Sox organization.

Introduced with much fanfare during a Saturday press conference, Robert strolled out to the pitcher's mound at Gauranteed Rate Field for a ceremonial first pitch wearing a White Sox hat and jersey prior to the first game of Saturday's doubleheader.

But amid the hype and the excitement for White Sox fans, patience will be required. Robert is still a ways away from the big leagues, with general manager Rick Hahn saying Saturday that the 19-year-old Cuban outfielder will begin his journey through the organization in the Dominican Republic with the White Sox team in the Dominican Summer League.

Hahn made a point of mentioning that Robert hasn't played in a baseball game since last summer, meaning it's been nearly a year since the White Sox newest highly touted prospect has taken the field.

“It should be noted he has not played in a game since last July. He’s been preparing for workouts over the last several months. So right now, from Chicago, he’s going to return to the Dominican and begin his development there," Hahn said. "He will prepare to join our Dominican Summer League team in the coming weeks and then we will get all the visas in place and take things from there. His initial assignment will be back to the Dominican as he prepares to work his way through the White Sox organization.

"We’re going to have to be patient with this because he hasn’t played in almost a year now. He has been training now quite frankly more to be a workout warrior than an everyday baseball player. We’re gonna take our time at our complex, get him back playing games regularly and then get him out there. But the fact that he hasn’t played in competition for 11 months now is going to be a factor in how quickly we move him along in '17."

[WHITE SOX TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

Scouting reports that have compared Robert to the likes of Adam Jones and Lorenzo Cain, plus the gaudy numbers he posted in the Cuban National Series including a .401 batting average in 53 games during the 2016 season, have generated plenty of buzz. Robert is already one of the White Sox top prospects and one of the higher-rated prospects in baseball on his first day as a pro.

But as Hahn mentioned Saturday, there's still plenty of development for Robert before he's ready for the majors.

"There’s still a fair amount of development for this player," Hahn said. "This will take some time here. But with his raw set of materials and what he’s accomplished in international competition and at the highest league in Cuba at a young age, helps reinforce how you project this player to develop."

Even before Robert's signing, it was obvious Hahn and the White Sox were playing the long game, with top prospects like Yoan Moncada, Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez and Michael Kopech allowed plenty of time before their eventual summons to the big leagues. Robert, again just 19 years old, will take some time, too. But the White Sox are confident it will all pay off.

"Luis Robert is going to be the player that his tools allow him to become and his health and development pace dictates," Hahn said. "We do think he has the potential to be a perennial impact player in the middle of our diamond and lineup for years to come. That’s an important piece to be able to add to the organization."

90 Days to Kickoff: Morris

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90 Days to Kickoff: Morris

CSNChicago.com preps reporter "Edgy" Tim O’Halloran spotlights 100 high school football teams in 100 days. The first 75 team profiles will focus on teams making strides across Chicagoland and elsewhere in the state. Starting Jul. 31, we’ll unveil the @CSNPreps Top 25 Power Rankings, leading up to kickoff on Friday, Aug. 25.

School: Morris

Head coach: Alan Thorson

Assistant coaches: John Courter, Greg Larsen, John Wodziak, Keith Anderson, Derek Johnston, Justin Zink, Matt Seidel, Brian Kasher, Ryan Battersby, Ryan Clauson, Tyler Hartley, Kyle Enervold

How they fared in 2016: 10-3 (3-1 Northern Illinois Big 12 East), lost to Peoria in the IHSA Class 5A semifinals.

[MORE: 91 Days to Kickoff - Ridgewood]

2017 regular season schedule:

Aug. 25 –DuSable

Sept. 1 – @ Washington

Sept. 8 – @ Quincy Notre Dame

Sept. 15 - Rochelle

Sept. 22 - @ Yorkville

Sept. 29 – DeKalb

Oct. 6 - Kaneland

Oct. 13 - @ Sycamore

Oct. 20 - @ Geneseo

Biggest storyline: Can the Redskins once again make a deep postseason run?

Names to watch this season: Senior OL Nathan Korte, Senior OL Nolan Feeney, WR/TE Tyler Spiezio

Biggest holes to fill: Morris will need to find some answers in the offensive skills department.

EDGY's early take: Morris will play its last season in the Northern Illinois Big 12 conference before heading to the Interstate 8 in 2018. If the Redskins can replace some graduated offensive skills players, Morris has a ton of experience, especially on both sides of the line, that could carry them deep into 5A. Also, keep an eye on the Redskins enrollment, which is pushing them closer and closer to Class 4A over the past few years.