'A Journey to Cambodia' to premiere Nov. 13, 14 on CSN

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'A Journey to Cambodia' to premiere Nov. 13, 14 on CSN

Get the full story of "A Journey to Cambodia"

Comcast SportsNet will debut Part 1 of "From the Sports World to the Third World: A Journey to Cambodia," a landmark, behind-the-scenes, two-part documentary at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 13, with Part 2 premiering at 7 p.m. on Nov. 14.

The documentary tells the story of two Chicago sports industry veterans -- Bill Smith (team photographer for the Bulls, Blackhawks and Bears) and Joe ONeil (Bulls senior director of ticket operations) -- who are changing the lives of hundreds of children and their families in poverty-stricken Cambodia.

"The board of directors of 'A New Day Cambodia' is thrilled that Comcast SportsNet visited Cambodia to see our accomplishments," said ONeil. "The CSN crew was present as we marked our five-year anniversary since opening our first center. One hundred children who previously scavenged garbage 10-12 hours a day now attend school full-time, speak English and have opportunities that never previously existed. We are excited that Comcast SportsNet will tell our story to help our visibility and awareness."

In July, CSN anchorreporter Chuck Garfien, along with CSN photographer Matt Zickus and associate producer Justin ONeil traveled with Smith and Joe ONeil to Cambodia to witness and document the difference being made by the pair and the foundation they helped create, A New Day Cambodia. The organization provides shelter, food, and education for those in need.

"From the Sports World to the Third World: A Journey to Cambodia" is a follow-up to CSNs Emmy-nominated 2010 documentary, "Bill Smith: Lasting Impressions," which introduced Smith and his wife, Lauren, and the life-changing trip they took to Cambodia in 2002.
During that visit, the two witnessed heart-breaking scenes of poverty -- families living in a garbage dump, scavenging for item in it that would be worth pennies and totaled less than 10 per month -- and decided on-the-spot to sponsor some of the children, remove them from those conditions and worked to send them to school.

From the Sports World to the Third World: A Journey to Cambodia features some of the children who have benefitted from the work of A New Day Cambodia and the newfound hope they have as a result.

"When you come back to the center three or six months later, the look and sparkle in their eyes is just the biggest difference their eyes hopelessness becomes hope for a future, and its not just that they are clean. They have a whole different persona," Bill Smith said. They hold their head higher, they have pride, they can take care of themselves and feel more human than they were before."

After trading Jimmy Butler, Bulls select Arizona PF Lauri Markkanen

After trading Jimmy Butler, Bulls select Arizona PF Lauri Markkanen

The Bulls enterted their rebuilding phase on Thursday night after trading Jimmy Butler. And with the No. 7 pick they received in that deal, they selected Arizona power forward Lauri Markkanen.

Markkanen, a 7-footer from Finland, played one season for the Wildcats, averaging 15.6 points and 7.2 rebounds in 30.8 minutes per game. Markkanen was a sharpshooter, connecting on 42.3 percent of his 163 3-pointers.

His defense is a question mark but his pick-and-pop ability should fit in well in Fred Hoiberg's offense.

The Bulls also received shooting guard Zach LaVine and point guard Kris Dunn in the deal for Butler. The Bulls sent the No. 16 pick along with Butler. They still have the No. 38 overall pick in the second round.

How Cubs reached the breaking point with Kyle Schwarber

How Cubs reached the breaking point with Kyle Schwarber

MIAMI – Theo Epstein scoffed at the possibility of sending a World Series hero down to the minors on May 16, writing the headline with this money quote: “If anyone wants to sell their Kyle Schwarber stock, we’re buying.”

If the Cubs aren’t dumping their Schwarber stock, they’re definitely reassessing their investment strategy, trying to figure out how such a dangerous postseason hitter had become one of the least productive players in the majors.

The overall portfolio hasn’t changed that much since the team president’s vote of confidence, Schwarber batting .179 for the defending champs then and .171 when the Cubs finally made the decision to demote him to Triple-A Iowa. That 18-19 team is now 36-35 and still waiting for that hot streak. 

What took so long?

“The honest answer is we believe in him so much,” general manager Jed Hoyer said Thursday. “He’s never struggled like this. We kept thinking that he was going to come out of it. We got to a point where we felt like mentally he probably needed a break before he could come out of this. 

“The honest answer is patience. We’ve got a guy who’s never really struggled. He was the best hitter in college baseball. He blew through the minor leagues. Last year in the World Series, he performed. We just felt like he was going to turn himself around.

“It just got to a place where we felt like the right way for this to come together was to allow him to get away from the team, to take a deep breath and be able to work on some things in a lower-pressure environment.”   

The Cubs plan to give Schwarber a few days off before he reports to Iowa, an idea that would have seemed unthinkable after watching his shocking recovery from knee surgery and legendary performance (.971 OPS) against the Cleveland Indians in last year’s World Series.

But preparing for one opponent and running on adrenaline through 20 plate appearances is completely different from handling the great expectations and newfound level of fame and doing it for an entire 162-game season.   

This might actually be the most normal part of Schwarber’s career after his meteoric rise from No. 4 overall pick in the 2014 draft to breakout star in the 2015 playoffs to injured and untouchable during last year’s trade talks with the New York Yankees. 

“There’s been a long and illustrious list of guys that have gone through this,” manager Joe Maddon said. “When a guy’s good, he’s good. Sometimes – especially when they’re this young – you just got to hit that reset button. It’s hard for a young player who’s never really struggled before to struggle on this stage and work his way through it.

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“There’s no scarlet letter attached to this. It’s just the way it happens sometimes. You have to do what you think is best. We think this is best for him right now. We know he’s going to be back.” 

When? The Cubs say they don’t have a certain number of Pacific Coast League at-bats in mind for a guy who’s played only 17 career games at the Triple-A level.

Maddon pointed out how Roy Halladay and Cliff Lee needed minor-league sabbaticals/refresher courses before becoming Cy Young Award winners and two of the best pitchers of their generation.

New York Mets outfielder Michael Conforto – another college hitter the Cubs closely scouted before taking Schwarber in the 2014 draft – has gone from the 2015 World Series to Triple-A Las Vegas for parts of last season to potential All-Star this year.

The Cubs fully expect their Schwarber stock to rebound – whether or not the turnaround happens in time to impact the 2017 bottom line.    

“I’m still sticking by him,” Maddon said. “But at some point, you have to be pragmatic. You have to do what’s best for everybody. We thought at this point that we weren’t going to necessarily get him back to where we need him to be just by continuing this same path.

“It’s not a matter of us not sticking with him anymore. We just thought this was the best way to go to really get him well, so that we could utilize the best side of Kyle moving forward.”