Kings vs. Devils: A Cinderella story

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Kings vs. Devils: A Cinderella story

If someone told me back in March that the Kings and Devils would be going to the Stanley Cup finals, I would have thought that person is crazy. Heck, if you told me a week ago that Los Angeles and New Jersey would be the two advancing, I still wouldn't have believed it.

But after last night's 3-2 overtime win against the Rangers, the Devils will be returing to the finals since they won it all back in 2003. Both teams have different advantages that could make this upcoming series more exciting than some may think.

Goaltending:

Jonathan Quick is the the number one reason the Kings qualified for the playoffs to begin with. He's recorded a .946 save percentage, two shutouts, earning himself a 1.54 goals against average during Los Angeles' 12-2 postseason run.

In the East, Martin Brodeur has earned a .923 save percentage and one shutout, recording a 2.04 GAA throughout the playoffs. He has led his team to a 12-5 record as they head into the finals.

Advantage: Kings

History:

The Kings haven't been to the finals since 1993, and they were eliminated in five games against the Montreal Canadiens. They have yet to win a Stanley Cup. That wouldn't seem like too much of a setback after seeing how well they've played throughout the postseason, but the Devils' statistics would make any Los Angeles fan a little nervous.

Back in 1995 and 2003, the Devils competed in the finals against the Red Wings and then the Ducks; two teams that entered the series with a 12-2 record. New Jersey defeated both. Given the fact that the Devils have won three Stanley Cups since 1974 also gives them an advantage--the Kings' franchise hasn't been there before.

In addition, if you take a look at the regular season, the Devils defeated the Kings in both their matchups back in October. But I don't think those statistics should be applied when analyzing the postseason since Los Angeles has played at an entirely different level since the beginning of the year.

Advantage: Devils

Momentum:

This is a tough one. The Kings have clearly defied all odds by going from the worst offensive team in the league to a top-contender for the Cup, but their last two games against Phoenix were shaky. Los Angeles was dominated in Game 4, and their Game 5 series win could have gone either way during overtime.

The Devils' record isn't as impressive as the Kings, but their last two games were more impressive overall. Although Game 6 against the Rangers was also a pretty even match, their aggressive play in overtime led to their win rather quickly. Plus, they were definitely the more dominant team in their Game 5 victory.

Although New Jersey played better in their last two games leading up to the finals, their overall playoff run hasn't been as consistent as the Kings' has, and Los Angeles' team chemistry has been more difficult to defeat. As long as the Kings remain focused and don't allow another slip-up like they did against Phoenix, they will be the stronger team.
Advantage: Kings

My overall prediction: Kings in 6.
Who would you like to see take home the Stanley Cup this year, and what are your final series predictions?

Cubs catcher Miguel Montero drops truth bomb, throws Jake Arrieta under the bus after Nationals run wild

Cubs catcher Miguel Montero drops truth bomb, throws Jake Arrieta under the bus after Nationals run wild

WASHINGTON — Within 24 hours, the Cubs followed up maybe their best win of the season with one of their ugliest losses and a classic Miguel Montero rant. Next stop: The Trump White House.

Montero walked across the room late Tuesday night with towels across his waist and over his shoulders and didn’t even bother to change into his clothes before calling the reporters over to his locker after a 6-1 loss to the Washington Nationals.

Montero dropped a truth bomb in the middle of the visiting clubhouse at Nationals Park, calling out Jake Arrieta without directly mentioning his name and talking in the third person after Washington stole seven bases in four innings.

“It really sucks because the stolen bases go on me,” Montero said. “When you really look at it, the pitcher doesn’t give me any time. It’s just like: ‘Yeah, OK, Miggy can’t throw nobody out.’ Yeah, but my pitchers don’t hold anybody on. It’s tough, because it doesn’t matter how much work I put in.

“If I don’t get a chance to throw, that’s the reason why they were running left and right today, because they know he was slow to the plate. Simple as that. It’s a shame that it’s my fault because I didn’t throw anybody out.”

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Now 0-for-31 in that department this season, Montero namedropped Jason Hammel — the ex-Cub now pitching for the Kansas City Royals — to show the de-emphasis on holding runners.

“We talk every year in spring training, but it’s frustrating, because it seems nobody really cares about it,” Montero said. “Like: ‘OK, yeah, I got to pitch. And if they run, they run, I don’t care.’

“Perfect example: We got Salvador Perez, the best throwing catcher in the game, and Jason Hammel’s got 10 stolen bases and only one caught stealing, so what does that tell you? They didn’t give him a chance.”

White Sox come back to beat Yankees on walk-off single by Jose Abreu

White Sox come back to beat Yankees on walk-off single by Jose Abreu

The White Sox offense put it together in just enough time on Tuesday night.

Jose Abreu’s bases-loaded single with two outs helped the White Sox rally from down two runs late for a 4-3 win over the New York Yankees in front of 18,023 at Guaranteed Rate Field. Abreu’s two-out single off Dellin Betances helped the White Sox avoid missing out on two bases-loaded opportunities in the final two innings.

It all came a little too late for Jose Quintana, who earned a no decision in spite of 6 1/3 scoreless innings. But given they had the winning run on board in a one-run loss on Monday and only scored once despite loading the bases with no outs in the eighth, the White Sox will take it.

Abreu, who struck out in the eighth with no outs after three straight walks, got ahead of Betances 2-1 in the count before he singled through the left side to score the tying and go-ahead runs.

Quintana earned the 63rd no decision of his career when the Yankees broke through in the eighth inning against Tommy Kahnle, who had a rare poor performance. Kahnle gave up a game-tying, two-out single to Aaron Judge and a two-run double to Gary Sanchez as the White Sox went from up a run to trailing 3-1.

The White Sox loaded the bases with no outs in the bottom of the eighth on all walks, but only scored once. Abreu struck out, Avisail Garcia flew out and Matt Davidson also whiffed to leave the bases loaded. The White Sox lone run came on a two-out walk by Todd Frazier.

The same offensive woes kept them from breaking out with Quintana on the hill. While they provided lavish run support in his previous two starts, the White Sox were back to their old ways with Quintana on Tuesday. They did give him a 1-0 lead when Abreu cued a two-out RBI double off Luis Severino.

But Severino was otherwise a machine as he struck out 12 batters and walked none. Severino struck out the side in the second and seventh innings and retired the last nine batters he faced.

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Still, Quintana didn’t need anything other than the early run. He continues to look more like himself as the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline approaches, making his third straight good turn.

Quintana worked with a good curveball/fastball combo to keep the Yankees off-balance. The 2016 All-Star thrived in the few instances when he got into trouble.

He struck out Tyler Austin with two men in scoring position to end the fourth inning and erased a leadoff walk in the fifth with an Austin Romine double play. After Quintana surrendered a two-out double to Judge in the sixth inning, he got Sanchez to pop out to strand the tying run.

Quintana allowed two hits, walked four and struck out six in 6 1/3 scoreless innings. Since he was hit hard by the Boston Red Sox on May 30, Quintana has been excellent, lowering his ERA from 5.30 to 4.37. In that span, Quintana has allowed 21 hits and six earned runs with 12 walks and 30 strikeouts in 30 1/3 innings.