Kleinschmidt lands 'my dream job'

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Kleinschmidt lands 'my dream job'

Tom Kleinschmidt is a Catholic Leaguer at heart. His roots are buried deep at Gordon Tech. In 1990, he led the basketball team to one of the most significant achievements in school history. So it isn't surprising to see him return as the Rams' new coach.But it wasn't a no-brainer. Sure, it is the "dream job" that he often thought about during his spectacular college career at DePaul and his professional career in Japan. But leaving York after one season as head coach was a "tough" decision."I had some great kids at York," Kleinschmidt said. "I had great parents, too. Usually you hear war stories about parents and their involvement with the program but I had wonderful relationships. The school made it easy for me."York, like many city and suburban schools, is undergoing budget cuts. The Elmhurst school recently laid off 10 teachers. Coaching assignments were being cut. The administration couldn't guarantee Kleinschmidt a job beyond the current year. "It was a year-to-year thing," he said.Kleinschmidt had enjoyed his first season as a head coach. York finished 22-9 after a 4-7 start. The Dukes won 13 in a row and 18 of their last 19, including a victory in the Martin Luther King tournament at Galesburg. They lost to Lake Park by four in the regional final.After he retired from basketball a few years ago, Gordon Tech approached him and inquired if he was interested in coaching. But he didn't have a degree. He returned to DePaul to complete his education, served on DePaul coach Jerry Wainwright's staff for two years, then went to York.After last season, Gordon Tech coach Shay Boyle resigned to join the staff at Notre Dame in Niles. Once again, Gordon Tech called to see if Kleinschmidt was interested in the job."My situation was in a flux," he said. "I interviewed for the job. York knew about it. After six weeks, they still couldn't give me a guarantee that I'd have a job at York. So I decided to take the Gordon Tech job. I got a hefty raise to come to Gordon Tech. In fact, I'll make more money than at York. I'll teach physical education and speech and I'll go back to college to get my teaching certificate. It is a win-win situation for everyone."Kleinschmidt had more to work with at York. He leaves behind three starters from last year's squad, including 6-foot-7 forward Frank Toohey and David Cohn, one of the best point guards in the state. And last year's sophomore squad was 20-5."I left a good situation. Last year, we finished second in the conference with two sophomores and a junior. This year, we figure to contend for the conference title," he said. "In one year, we made a lot of progress. The kids bought into my system. It's tough to leave. It wasn't a good four weeks thinking about leaving. The kids were continuously on my mind. But finally, I had to do what was best for me."At Gordon Tech, he inherits five of the top seven players from a 14-15 team that lost to Rockford Lutheran in the Class 2A sectional final. But the Rams are saddled with a 31-game conference losing streak. This year's trip to the sectional final marked their first since 2000.It isn't the way it used to be. In 1980, when Tom Winiecki coached Gordon Tech to the state football championship, the school had an enrollment of 2,000 boys. Today, the enrollment is 400 boys and girls. Gone are the days when the basketball teams of coaches Dick Versace, Dan Chubrilo, Bob Ociepka, Steve Pappas and Scott Bogumill dominated the Catholic League and ranked among the best in the state."It's a different atmosphere and culture than when I played," Kleinschmidt said. "Some people still are there who were there when I was there. But this is something I wanted all along. I was hopeful that I could go back and help Gordon Tech as they helped me. But it wasn't an easy decision. It wasn't about money."At York, you can't recruit. At Gordon Tech, I have to get out and outwork people and persuade kids to come to Gordon Tech who have been going to Whitney Young, Lane Tech, Fenwick, Notre Dame, Loyola and St. Ignatius. It's all about re-establishing relationships in the community."I can capitalize on my name. It might get me in the door. But it won't close the deal. They have to buy into what I am telling them. I have to sell them on the person I am and how I can help their kids. I have to show up for football games. I remember that coach Pappas came to my baseball games. He must want me, I thought to myself. I have to be visible. I have no problem going to Welles Park or Horner Park. I used to hang out with their fathers."So Kleinschmidt will be re-establishing relationships at the neighborhood parishes that once stocked Gordon Tech with football and basketball talent, including Queen of Angels, St. Benedict, St. Gertrude, St. Hilary, St. Malachi and St. Andrew, all within a two-mile radius of the school. Parents and potential athletes will be asking some of the same questions that Kleinschmidt asked when he interviewed for the job. Yes, he asked about the future of Gordon Tech. In recent years, there have been rumors that it might close ever since Kleinschmidt graduated in 1991. But he was assured that the school won't close. Enrollment has increased by 10, 10 and 20 percent in the last three years.He blames the economic downturn and changes in the neighborhood for the decline of the basketball program at Gordon Tech. When he attended the school, the tuition was 1,250 a year. Now it is 8,500. And that is lowest prices for a Catholic school education in the Chicago area compared to tuitions of 1,400 to 1,600 at Fenwick, Loyola or St. Ignatius."There are positive signs. The neighborhoods are coming back. Catholic grade schools are turning kids away. They aren't on decline anymore," he said. "I've got to do it like I always do it--outwork people, get in the gyms, extend my hand to alumni and old-timers and old friends. I look forward to playing in the Catholic League again."One of his first stops will be at annual Catholic League Hall of Fame dinner on May 3.

Cubs hopeful Kyle Hendricks returns before All-Star break

Cubs hopeful Kyle Hendricks returns before All-Star break

MIAMI – The Cubs are hopeful Kyle Hendricks could return before the All-Star break and stabilize a rotation that misses his overall consistency and the unique stuff that made him a National League Cy Young Award finalist last season.

A healthy Hendricks is critical to any second-half surge the Cubs are hoping for now, and so much of his game revolves around feel and the ability to manipulate a baseball in different ways. The tendinitis in his right hand has subsided to the point where he can soon reboot his throwing program.

“He’s feeling good,” manager Joe Maddon said before Friday night’s game at Marlins Park. “He’s going to throw any moment now, tomorrow or the next day possibly. (Athletic trainer) PJ (Mainville) was very optimistic, and so was Kyle.”

The Cubs placed Hendricks on the disabled list retroactive to June 5 and needed at least two MRIs to get a better sense of the inflammation in a tendon on the back of his middle finger.

The year after leading the majors in ERA, Hendricks is 4-3 with a 4.09 ERA and getting an unplanned break after making seven playoff starts in 2015 and 2016 combined. The Cubs aren’t thinking conservatively and waiting until after the All-Star break.

“If he’s ready to go, go ahead,” Maddon said. “This is one of those things in the finger (where) you got to throw the ball and just feel a baseball. If he’s doing that, there’s no reason to hold him back.

“Whatever that pinching feeling was…as long as he’s good to go, I think it’s wise to just let him go and play.”

White Sox Minor League Report: Micker Adolfo tapping into power potential

White Sox Minor League Report: Micker Adolfo tapping into power potential

As part of a weekly series, presented by Ozinga, CSNChicago.com will highlight the top performances of several prospects in a weekly minor league report.

White Sox Blueprint Player of the Week: Micker Adolfo (OF), Kannapolis Intimidators

The White Sox are finally seeing the player they envisioned when they signed the No. 2 ranked international prospect in 2013.

As he still grows into his 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame, Micker Adolfo has put his power potential on display in Kannapolis this season.

Adolfo has been on a tear throughout his last 10 games as he's hit .368 to go along with three home runs, seven RBI and four walks. 

On the season, Adolfo is slashing .286/.347/.493 and has already set career-highs in several categories, including home runs (8), RBI (35), hits (65), doubles (21) and runs (37).

Charlotte Knights

It looks like that nagging thumb injury is finally behind MLB's No. 1 prospect.

In his last 10 games at Charlotte, Moncada is batting .282 with a home run, six RBI and a stolen base. Moncada has also shown an impressive eye at the plate during that span, as he had a 12/11 BB/K ratio.

Birmingham Barons

It's spelled trouble for opposing hitters when Jordan Stephens has been on the mound in 2017.

The Texas-native has started three games since coming off the DL and carries an 0.98 ERA with 15 strikeouts in 18.1 innings pitched.

Stephens is currently MLB Pipeline's No. 14 White Sox prospect.

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Winston-Salem Dash

After a slow start following a promotion to Winston-Salem, the forgotten piece from the Washington Nationals in the Adam Eaton trade has been on a tear.

In three June starts, Dane Dunning has allowed just three earned runs on 13 hits and has 23 strikeouts in 17.2 innings pitched.

DSL White Sox

Although he hasn't homered since his first game in the Dominican Summer League, Cuban outfielder Luis Robert has shown tremendous discipline in the batter's box. 

Robert has averaged one walk per game and has a .258 batting average in 10 games. He's also added four stolen bases on the season.

Great Falls Voyagers

A pair of players from the White Sox 2016 draft class have gotten off to hot starts in the Rookie League.

Anthony Villa, a 19th rounder out of St. Mary's, has a robust 1.777 OPS in his first four games and has belted two home runs and six RBI.

Infielder Luis Curbello, a sixth-round selection out of Cocoa High School in Florida, has a .429/.529/.714 slash line with a home run and two RBI.