NBA lockout: Everything you need to know

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NBA lockout: Everything you need to know

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Some questions and answers about the NBA's labor impasse: Q: What's the damage so far? A: NBA Commissioner David Stern canceled the first two weeks of the regular season Monday, with both owners and players estimating losses at hundreds of millions of dollars. Q: What happens next? A: No meetings are currently scheduled, and Stern warned that more games could be lost with each passing day. Q: What were the NBA's revenues last season? A: The league brought in about 4.3 billion, of which 3.8 billion fell into the category of basketball-related income (BRI). BRI is basically all the money made through basketball operations, including gate receipts, broadcast revenues, in-arena sales of novelties and concessions, arena signage revenues, game parking and program revenues, sponsorship revenues, etc. Q: So what's the problem? A: Players were guaranteed 57 percent of BRI, and the league says owners were destined to lose money when they only kept 43 cents of every dollar. Q: How bad was it for owners? A: They say they lost 300 million last season, after losing hundreds of millions in every year of the previous collective bargaining agreement that was ratified in 2005. The league says 22 of its 30 teams lost money, including losses of 20 million or more for 11 of them. Q: Couldn't they avoid those problems if the teams that made money shared more with the others? A: That's what the players say, calling the NBA's revenue-sharing program "insignificant." The league says a more robust revenue-sharing plan is coming, but not until after a new CBA with the players, because right now all it would be doing is sharing losses. Q: What do the owners want? A: The league has two goals in the negotiations: A system that would guarantee owners a chance to make a profit, and a system where all teams would have a chance to compete equally for a championship. Q: How far apart are they financially? A: Each side's last formal proposal was a 53-47 revenue split in its favor. Given each full BRI percentage point was worth nearly 40 million last season, the sides are officially around 240 million apart in the first year of a deal. Q: Why is competitive balance a problem now? A: Because the NBA's "soft" salary cap system allows teams to spend above it by using various exceptions. There is a luxury tax level in which teams have to pay a 1 tax for every 1 they exceed the threshold by, but big-market teams simply absorbed the penalty that smaller-market clubs were unable to. So the league says small-market teams can't compete in the NBA like they do in the NFL, where Green Bay, Indianapolis, New Orleans and Pittsburgh have won recent Super Bowls. Q: What do players think about a hard cap? A: They're completely opposed, to the extent that union executive director Billy Hunter has called it a "blood issue." Players believe a hard cap would eliminate fully guaranteed contracts for all but a handful of top players and set up a system like the NFL, where teams cut even high-performing players for cap reasons and aren't required to pay their full contracts. Q: Is playing overseas a viable option? A: Not as good as players hoped, which is why Stern downplayed it as a bargaining threat from the start. Economic difficulties in Europe mean teams there simply can't pay enough to entice NBA stars, and China essentially removed itself as an option when it ruled its teams couldn't offer contracts with opt-out clauses, meaning players who sign there are required to stay all season. Q: Can they still play a full 82-game season? A: Stern said everything is negotiable, but it will be difficult. Arenas have few dates available and already have been told they can book events on nights games were scheduled for the first two weeks of the season.

Connor McDavid believes Blackhawks prospect Alex DeBrincat will succeed in NHL: 'He's a special player'

Connor McDavid believes Blackhawks prospect Alex DeBrincat will succeed in NHL: 'He's a special player'

Blackhawks prospect Alex DeBrincat is putting up video-game numbers in the Ontario Hockey League.

He ranks first among all players with 49 goals and 104 points, and has done so in only 50 games. That's an average of more than two points per game.

DeBrincat, the Blackhawks' second-round draft pick (No. 39 overall) in 2015 thanks to the Andrew Shaw trade, became the Erie Otters' all-time leading goal scorer earlier this year and on Saturday, he tied Brad Boyes for second on the team's all-time points list with 309. The only player he's chasing now is teammate Dylan Strome, who has 329 and counting.

Connor McDavid, who ranks fourth in Otters history with 285 points, was there for DeBrincat's rookie season when he scored 51 goals and 50 assists. The 20-year-old Oilers captain very much still pays attention to the Otters, and isn't surprised by the heightened success of his former teammate.

"He’s having another amazing season," McDavid said. "No surprise there."

It was easy to suggest DeBrincat's numbers were inflated because he benefited from having a player like McDavid centering his line. But McDavid insists that wasn't the case.

"Honestly, we helped each other," McDavid said. "It was not a one-way street by any means. He finds a way to score goals. My year they were saying, 'Oh, he was just playing with me.' Then the other year, he’s playing with (Strome). He’s playing with Stromer again. To score 50 three seasons in a row is absolutely incredible no matter who you’re playing with or what you’re doing. Absolute credit to him."

[SHOP: Gear up, Blackhawks fans!]

The numbers back it up, too.

DeBrincat's points per game average has increased in each of the last three seasons: 1.53, 1.68 and 2.08, a significant jump from his second to third season. It's especially impressive when you factor in that he's scored only eight of his 49 goals on the power play this year after combining for 34 goals on the man advantage in his first two. 

Initially, McDavid was a little skeptical when informed that newly-signed winger DeBrincat, who's now listed as 5-7, 170 pounds, would be his new linemate. It didn't take long for that to change.

"He kind of just came out of nowhere," McDavid said. "I remember us signing (him) and looking, and it said he was 5-2, 140 pounds, whatever. The GM at the time, Sherry Bassin, said 'I found you a new winger.' I’m like, ‘That guy is going to play with me?’ Sure enough, he comes in and we kind of have that chemistry right away.

"He knows where the net is. He finds a way to score basically every night. He’s got a great shot. He’s one of the feistiest guys I’ve ever played with. It’s really remarkable about what he’s been able to do."

Size is surely to be the biggest concern for DeBrincat at the NHL level, but players such as Cam Atkinson (5-7), Johnny Gaudreau (5-8) and Mats Zuccarello (5-7) are proving that you can be among the league's best despite being undersized. And the game is evolving into more of an up-tempo style where teams built on speed is becoming the new norm.

DeBrincat's willingness to stick his nose into dirty areas combined with his offensively-gifted ability is a big reason why McDavid believes his former linemate will succeed at the highest level.

"I think well," McDavid said when asked how DeBrincat's game will translate into the NHL. "He’s just got such a drive and such a nose for the net that I don’t think he’s going to be stopped. He takes on guys much bigger. I don’t really know how he does it.

"Especially when he was a rookie and I was playing with him, he’s going into scrums against guys that are 6-5, and you’re on the ice thinking, ‘How the hell am I going to help you?’ He definitely picks his fights. He’s a special person and special player."

CSN's Dan Hayes meets the White Sox Dan Hayes

CSN's Dan Hayes meets the White Sox Dan Hayes

Is the White Sox clubhouse big enough for two Dan Hayeses?

We're about to find out this spring training as CSN White Sox Insider Dan Hayes covers the team, which includes first base prospect Danny Hayes.

The Sox prospect Hayes battled .250 with 10 homers and 42 RBIs in 55 games for Charlotte last season.

The big-league hopeful and White Sox beat reporter spoke with CSN's Chuck Garfien about the similarities the two (don't) have.

No word yet on whether they'll battle the two Rougned Odors and Geovani/Geovany Sotos to an Anchoman-style duel.

Check it all out in the hilarious video above.