Northwestern's road success continues in win over No. 23 Illinois

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Northwestern's road success continues in win over No. 23 Illinois

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Theres no place like the road for Northwestern.

The Wildcats kept up their impressive play away from home, taking a 68-54 win from No. 23 Illinois in Champaign on Thursday night. The win was Northwesterns fifth outside Welsh-Ryan Arena this season, but just its first against a ranked opponent.

Northwestern coach Bill Carmody was at a loss to explain his teams road prowess, however. When asked why his team did so well away from home he could only shrug.

I have no idea, he said. A good start on the road is usually importantwe played one of our better games this year and we had to to beat these guys here. Our defense was solid and we made shots.

Reggie Hearn came up big for the visitors, scoring 20 in the win. The senior guard is still not at 100 percent after spraining his ankle over the winter break, Carmody commented, but his effort buoyed the Wildcats against Illinois.

Hearns been having a very good year despite being injured, Carmody said. Hes still not really back, but he set the tone and let everyone know, Come on fellas, lets go.

Hearn was one of five Wildcats who reached double figures in scoring on Thursday, joined by Jared Swopshire and Alex Marcotullio, who each scored 12, as well as Dave Sobolewski and Tre Demps, who scored 10 apiece.

As in its loss to Wisconsin last Saturday, Illinois (14-5, 1-4) let its opposing number get out to an early lead. Northwestern found ample space between Illini defenders early the game and made the most of its opportunities.

The Wildcats went the first eight minutes of the game without missing a three point shot, making four during that span and taking an 18-11 lead over the hosts. Hearn had the hot hand for Northwestern, scoring eight in the first eight minutes, including two from behind the arc.

The first 10 minutes they were a juggernaut, Illinois coach John Groce said. We werent as locked in as we needed to be and they made us pay.

The Illini defense struggled all through the first half and the offense fared little better. From 12:08 to 6:33 the hosts turned the ball over six times in a span of eight possessions. The sloppy offense from Illinois helped Northwestern grab a 28-14 lead with 5:12 left in the first half.

An old-fashioned three-point play from Tyler Griffey, a converted and-one, looked like it might swing the momentum in Illinois direction. Alex Olah and Alex Marcotullio kept momentum with the Wildcats by scoring back-to-back layups, however. Layups continued to come easy for Northwestern, and an easy basket by Kale Abrahamson with three minutes left put NU ahead 34-19 and drew boos from the home fans.

The Illini were able to hold on to the ball for the final shot of the first half, but nothing would break their way. A last-second floater from Tracy Abrams and a put back attempt from Sam McLaurin glanced off the rim, and the buzzer went off with Northwestern holding a commanding lead, 36-21.

Illinois came out of the gates hot in the second half, stripping the ball from the Wildcats three times in the first four minutes. On the offensive end the Illini made the most of those turnovers, going on a 7-2 run in the first three minutes. McLaurin hit a pair of layups and Brandon Paul drained a three to pull the hosts within 10 again, 38-28.

It did not take long for Northwestern to stem the Illini run, however. Back-to-back threes from Swopshire and Marcotullio kept the hosts at bay, putting the Cats in front 45-30 with 12 minutes to play.

The Illini continued to play with vigor, which extended to Groce, who was given a technical for speaking his mind a bit too vigorously. Small errors, like unforced turnovers from McLaurin and Abrams, kept Illinois from mounting a serious comeback. Northwestern made just three field goals in the first 12 minutes of the second half, but managed to hold a 15-point lead, 48-33, at the under-eight media timeout.

The Wildcats lead would dip below 10 twice before games end. The second time, coming with three minutes to play, would quickly be erased by an and-1 from Swopshire, putting NU ahead 53-14 and sending fans in Champaign streaming toward the exits.

Paul, who had a game high 21 points, made a few pretty dunks for Illinois in the final minute of play, but they went for naught as Northwestern blew out the hosts. Groce was happy with his teams second-half play, but was disappointed he did not see the same effort for all 40 minutes.

I appreciate our guys effort in the second half, I thought we played a lot harder, he said. By the second we were trying to dig ourselves out of a hole. We gotta coach better, we gotta play better.

High School coaches 'leave no stone unturned' in helping players explore next level

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Photo at top: Loyola Academy assistant coach Paul Pryma extends his hand toward a Steinmetz High School player during pregame introductions on Feb. 21. (Andres Waters/MEDILL)

High School coaches 'leave no stone unturned' in helping players explore next level

By Andres Waters
Special Contributor to CSNChicago.com

After Loyola Academy held off rival New Trier 43-40 to win the 2017 Zion-Benton regional championship, Ramblers head coach Tom Livatino had a special message for his players.

"That's the best celebration that I have ever been a part of," Livatino said. "Because everybody was completely about love. You guys love each other and we all can tell. I'm really, really proud just to be one of our coaches."

While the speech was a powerful way for Livatino to tell the players of his appreciation, he and other high school coaches engage in something much bigger to show players how proud they are: college recruiting.

In addition to time spent planning and practicing, coaches also sacrifice countless hours each week helping their players find opportunities to play at the next level.

"It's a really long part of the process, but to be honest, it's a part of the job that I absolutely love," Livatino said. "We demand so much of our players in every aspect. And, from a basketball standpoint, the least I could do is everything in my power to help them out."

Less than 48 hours after the Ramblers completed their season with a loss to Evanston Township in the Waukegan Sectional semifinal, Livatino was back in his office holding individual meetings with each player.

Starting with the 10 departing seniors, Livatino discussed the factors that go into choosing a college for high school athletes.

His conversations with the two players who already committed, senior guards Ramar Evans and Matt Lynch, focused on how they felt about their next steps. With the others, Livatino asked whether they wanted to play at the next level and, if so, which schools they wanted to attend that shared an interest in them. The conversations held with the Ramblers' juniors are very similar.

"I wasn't just looking for basketball, I was looking for a fit academically and socially," said Lynch, who committed to Division III St. Norbert College. "[Livatino] said St. Norbert would be the best fit for me. It fit everything I was looking for."

Read the full story at Medill Reports Chicago.

CSN Chicago, in partnership with Northwestern University,  features journalism by students in the graduate program at Medill School of Journalism. The students are reporters for Medill News Service. Medill faculty members edit the student work. Click here for more information about Medill.

From dunks to deliveries: Former No. 1 pick LaRue Martin's unlikely success story

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Photo at top: La Rue Martin poses for a photo at a National Basketball Retired Players Association event. (Photo courtesy of La Rue Martin)

From dunks to deliveries: Former No. 1 pick LaRue Martin's unlikely success story

By Elan Kane
Special Contributor to CSNChicago.com

LaRue Martin Jr. thought his future was set. The Portland Trail Blazers had drafted him No. 1 overall in the 1972 NBA draft. Money and fame awaited.

Fifteen years later, he started work as a UPS driver, struggling to find uniform pants that fit his 6-foot-11 frame.

"There is life after sports," Martin said. "Period."

It's been 45 years since the draft and Martin, a former Loyola University star, is now the UPS Illinois district public affairs and community services manager. He is labeled by many as one of the biggest busts in NBA draft history, but he is fine with that designation.

"I don't believe in saying anything negative, you have no control over that," Martin said. "I took care of my family, did what I had to do and I'm the type of person I can't dwell off the negatives. I can't. I kept my head up high and moved onto a positive mode of life and it has treated me very well."

Martin averaged 5.3 points and 4.6 rebounds in 14 minutes per game in just four seasons with the Trail Blazers. He blames his low numbers on his lack of playing time, but many believe he was just not good enough.

"He didn't get playing time because he [stunk]," said Boston Globe sports columnist Bob Ryan, who has covered the NBA for decades. "[Former No. 1 overall draft pick Michael] Olowokandi didn't do much but I think he did more than that."

Martin is used to the criticism.

"As a young man, reading the papers all the time, that bothered me, I must admit that," Martin said. "But I hold my head up high now because I've been very successful in the corporate world."

Read the full story at Medill Reports Chicago.

CSN Chicago, in partnership with Northwestern University,  features journalism by students in the graduate program at Medill School of Journalism. The students are reporters for Medill News Service. Medill faculty members edit the student work. Click here for more information about Medill.