NFL may target offensive players on head-hunting

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NFL may target offensive players on head-hunting

According to The Concussion Blog, through Week 12 of the NFL 127 concussionshead injuries had been diagnosed and reported. Every team in the league has had at least one player suffer a concussion, with Atlanta and Houston (1) the least affected, and the Raiders (9) hit hardest.
But while fines, rule changes and even game suspensions have been handed down to players leading with their helmets on defenseless offensive players, the numbers between offense and defense concussions are closer than most think.
Through Week 12, 70 offensive players have been diagnosed, compared with 57 defensive players.
Defensive backs have suffered the most concussions (32), followed by wide receivers (24), linebackers and running backs (15), running backs (14), tight ends (13), offensive linemen (12), defensive linemen (10), and lastly, quarterbacks (7).
It's no surprise that wide receivers and defensive backs lead the league in diagnosed concussions, as the game becomes faster and the passing game continues to take over.
And while many of the league's strict rule changes and overall culture change in how defenders attack offensive players are set to ensure the safety of the defenders, too, the numbers tell a story that offensive players can also pack a punch.
In an exclusive on OnMilwaukee.com, Jim Owczarski received an email statement from Greg Aiello, the NFL's senior vice president of public relations, saying "helmet-to-helmet contact between a runner and defender (especially in the open field) will be reviewed in the off-season by the Competition Committee."
A rule handed down by the NFL could follow suit of that which the NCAA has, stating that "No player shall target and initiate contact against an opponent with the crown (top) of his helmet. When in question, it is a foul." (Section 1. Personal Fouls, Article 3)
Owczarski interviewed several Green Bay Packers, who said most offensive players lower their head to protect their bodies and make contact with their shoulders, not to intentionally go after defenders.
Concerns over whether offensive players not being able to lower their heads would slow the game down, make players more timid to protect themselves and potentially result in more injuries not related to the head.
The concussion rules are sure to be changed, improved and changed again over the coming years, but adding the new wrinkle to offensive players being subject to personal foul penalties for hits on "defenseless defenders" or review from the NFL after the games would be a major change.
What are your thoughts on this potential move from the Competition Committee?

Preview: Chris Sale faces Jose Quintana, White Sox Tuesday on CSN

Preview: Chris Sale faces Jose Quintana, White Sox Tuesday on CSN

 

The White Sox take on the Red Sox on Tuesday, and you can catch all the action on CSN and live streaming on CSNChicago.com and the NBC Sports App.

Coverage begins with White Sox Pregame Live at 6:30 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Today’s starting pitching matchup: Jose Quintana (2-6, 4.82 ERA) vs. Chris Sale (5-2, 2.34 ERA)

Click here for more stats to make sure you’re ready for the action.

— Channel finder: Make sure you know where to watch.

— Latest on the White Sox: All of the most recent news and notes.

Joe Maddon thinking shake-up for Cubs? ‘I have no idea what that would be’

Joe Maddon thinking shake-up for Cubs? ‘I have no idea what that would be’

SAN DIEGO – Joe Maddon looked down at the desk, shook his head and didn’t hesitate when asked if he was thinking about making some lineup changes to jolt the Cubs.

“I have no idea what that would be,” Maddon said after Monday’s 5-2 loss to the Padres at Petco Park. “We’ve tried everything possible. Guys have been rested. We’ve given guys days off. These are our players. I have all the faith in the world.”

The defending World Series champs are a .500 team through the Memorial Day checkpoint, but Maddon projected calm from the manager’s office to the cameras, expecting that message to filter out toward his clubhouse.

But this wasn’t the red-hot Dodgers pushing all the right bullpen buttons and executing a game plan almost flawlessly. The Cubs had Jarred Cosart on the ropes – and bases-loaded opportunities in the first, second and seventh innings – but still couldn’t deliver the knockout punch against a last-place team.

The Padres gave up 10 walks while the Cubs went 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position and left 11 men on base.

“We came off a 7-2 homestand,” Maddon said. “Everybody loved us a couple days ago. Now all of a sudden, we’ve had a tough time scoring runs on the road. We just got to do better. That’s all this comes down to.”

[MORE CUBS: How Kris Bryant became the face of the never-panic Cubs]

Until Jason Heyward lined a 93-mph Cosart fastball into right field for a two-out, bases-loaded single and a 2-0 lead in the first inning, the middle of that homestand (May 21) had been the last time the Cubs scored without hitting a home run.

“Everybody’s proverbially trying way too hard,” Maddon said. “(Don’t) try to hit homers. Really, again, take what they give you. Play with the middle. You got to convince them to do it. They got to do it.

“It’s not complicated. You can see the big swings coming out of our zone when just a single would do. That’s it. We did it before. We can do it again. We just got to keep talking. But then you have to use the velvet hammer as opposed to a real one. Otherwise, you have no chance whatsoever.”