Following explosive report, ND says Te'o a 'Catfish' victim

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Following explosive report, ND says Te'o a 'Catfish' victim

Lennay Kekua, purported to be Manti Te'o's girlfriend, was a hoax. Whether Te'o was a victim or perpetrator of the hoax, though, remains up for debate.

Deadspin.com's Timothy Burke and Jack Dickey originally published a report Wednesday afternoon detailing how Kekua, who was thought to have passed away from Leukemia within 24 hours of Te'o's grandmother in September, never existed. The article adds a friend of the person behind Kekua was "80 percent sure" Te'o was part of the hoax.

Notre Dame officials painted a different picture later on Wednesday.

"This appears to be, at a minimum, a sad and very cruel deception to entertain its perpetrators," Notre Dame Assistant Vice President Dennis Brown said in a statement.

Notre Dame Athletic Director Jack Swarbrick explained after conversations with Te'o and through the findings of a private investigative firm hired by the university, he had concluded Te'o was the victim of a "Catfish" scam.

Swarbrick presented this timeline of events:

- Sometime in 2009, Te'o and Kekua "met" online, with Te'o responding to an advance from the Kekua.

- Over the next three years, Te'o attempted to meet Kekua face-to-face, but never did. "As part of the hoax, several meetings were set up where Lennay never showed, including some in Hawaii," Swarbrick said.

- Also over the next three years, Te'o and Kekua would frequently talk on the phone, and even sleep with the phone on next to their heads.

- Earlier in 2012, Kekua purportedly was in a car accident, and it was discovered she had leukemia. In September, a few days after Notre Dame beat Purdue and around the time of the death of Te'o's grandmother, Te'o was led to believe Kekua has passed away. Swarbrick explains: "(The perpetrators) understood, given the extraordinary nature of this man, the more trouble she was in car accident, diagnosis of leukemia, failing health the more engaged he would become, the more focused he would become, and the more dedicated he would become, and that's exactly what happened here."

- On Dec. 6, while Te'o was in Orlando for the ESPN College Football Awards Show, he received a call from a number he thought to be Kekua's. Te'o answered the phone, and the voice was that of the person he believe was Kekua -- only he also believed she had died three months earlier. That person told Te'o she was, in fact, not dead and attempted to re-start the relationship.

- On Dec. 26, after conferring with his family in Hawaii, Te'o informed coach Brian Kelly and defensive coordinator Bob Diaco of his situation. Swarbrick was quickly notified of the situation and set up a meeting with Te'o on Dec. 27, when the linebacker returned to campus.

- On Dec. 27, Swarbrick met with Te'o for an hour and 45 minutes, and followed that up with another meeting on Dec. 28. From there, Swarbrick shared the information he had gathered with university officials and decided to hire a private investigative firm to look into the situation.

- Not via Swarbrick, but on Jan. 3 in South Florida, Te'o was asked about the tragedy he had dealt with this season, with the question specifically mentioning his girlfriend's death. He responded:

"I think whenever you're in football, it takes your mind off a lot of things," he said. "You know, this team is very special to me, and the guys on it have always been there for me, through the good times and the bad times. I rarely have a quiet time to myself because I always have somebody calling me, asking, do you want to go to the movies.

"Coach is always calling me asking me, "Are you okay? Do you need anything?" I have three roommates, Zeke (Motta), Carlo (Calabrese) and Robby Toma, who are always yelling at each other, who's going to play Call of Duty. I'm rarely by myself, and that's how I like it. I'm always around my guys, always around my family."

- On Jan. 4, Swarbrick received a report from the private investigative firm.

- On Jan. 5, Swarbrick shared that information with Te'o's parents. After conferring with Brian and Ottilia Te'o, Swarbrick was under the impression the family was prepared to release what happened to Te'o to the public sometime in the week of Jan. 26.

A few questions still remain, which will be directed at Te'o when he speaks on the matter -- his agent, Tom Condon, told ESPN.com that'll happen soon.

Among them: Why did Te'o and his family say he met Kekua on campus at Stanford in 2009? Did Te'o ever attempt to video chat with Kekua, as many of those in online relationships do? What was the nature of Te'o's relationship with Ronaiah Tuiasosopo, reported by Deadspin to be the man behind Kekua and someone with whom it appears Te'o has interacted on various social media platforms and even in person?

Furthermore, why did former Arizona Cardinals fullback Reagan Mauia tell ESPN.com he met Kekua and insist she exists?

It's all part of a bizarre story that, perhaps, will gain some clarity once Te'o speaks on it beyond the statement he released Wednesday following the Deadspin report. That statement confirmed that Kekua's existence was a hoax, and reads:

"This is incredibly embarrassing to talk about, but over an extended period of time, I developed an emotional relationship with a woman I met online, Teo said. We maintained what I thought to be an authentic relationship by communicating frequently online and on the phone, and I grew to care deeply about her.

To realize that I was the victim of what was apparently someone's sick joke and constant lies was, and is, painful and humiliating.

It further pains me that the grief I felt and the sympathies expressed to me at the time of my grandmother's death in September were in any way deepened by what I believed to be another significant loss in my life.

I am enormously grateful for the support of my family, friends and Notre Dame fans throughout this year. To think that I shared with them my happiness about my relationship and details that I thought to be true about her just makes me sick. I hope that people can understand how trying and confusing this whole experience has been.

In retrospect, I obviously should have been much more cautious. If anything good comes of this, I hope it is that others will be far more guarded when they engage with people online than I was. Fortunately, I have many wonderful things in my life, and I'm looking forward to putting this painful experience behind me as I focus on preparing for the NFL draft.

The events of Wednesday were a stunning turn for a player who seemed to have built an infallible legacy at Notre Dame. Te'o won more awards in a single season than any other college football player ever had and finished second in Heisman Trophy voting with the most votes of any previous runner-up.

He graced the cover of Sports Illustrated after Notre Dame's emotional win over Michigan, in which students brought leis en masse to Notre Dame Stadium to support Te'o after the deaths of his grandmother and now proven to be non-existent girlfriend.

Expect more to come out about this story in the coming days and weeks, but for now, we await they next turn in an unexpected string of events.

Correction: The ESPN Awards Show was incorrectly dated as Dec. 7. It occurred Dec. 6.

Notre Dame players react to the firing of Brian VanGorder

Notre Dame players react to the firing of Brian VanGorder

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — James Onwualu and Brian VanGorder came to the Irish defense at the same time back in 2014, when Onwualu was moved from wide receiver to (briefly) safety right around when the now-former defensive coordinator was hired. 

Under VanGorder’s watch, Onwualu developed into a reliable outside linebacker and ultimately a senior captain. So when Notre Dame fired VanGorder on Sunday — a day after the school’s student section chanted “Fire Van-Gord-Er” during that brutal loss to Duke — it wasn’t necessarily an easy piece of news to digest for Onwualu and some of his teammates. 

“Obviously everybody was talking about it, even our student section seemed to have a strong stance on that,” Onwualu said. “It was shocking to me. Obviously this is the only defensive experience I've ever had. He's really all I knew defensively. So it's difficult for some older guys, you know, and me included to put that aside and just take the next step into something new.”

But that’s what Notre Dame has to do with VanGorder’s rocky tenure in the rearview mirror and Greg Hudson taking over as defensive coordinator, with coach Brian Kelly taking an increased role in his team’s leaky defense. 

Players understood why the move — which came in the wake of Kelly’s postgame comments saying everyone’s job wasn’t safe — was made, turning to the “it’s a business” line more frequently seen in a level of the sport in which the players are paid (which isn’t to say they’re wrong for viewing college football that way). 

“It was a bit surprising,” junior linebacker Nyles Morgan said. “I knew him personally obviously playing defense, but it’s a business. And so we’ve really bought into what coach (Greg) Hudson’s been saying, and we have to move forward. We can’t linger in the past.”

It’s not like Notre Dame players were blind to the problem, though. The team’s first sack of the season came when Morgan dropped Duke quarterback Daniel Jones on Saturday, and the defense allowed 50, 36 and 38 points in Notre Dame’s three losses. 

“The whole defense knows that we need to play better ball, and obviously if we were playing better ball, that maybe not would have happened,” Onwualu said. 

Safety Drue Tranquill said he felt some guilt about the firing of VanGorder and had sympathy for his now-former coach. 

“It wasn’t just coach VanGorder’s fault, the entire defense was struggling as a whole,” Tranquill said. “And he happens to be the leader of that. This is a really cutthroat business and I personally feel a sort of responsibility on my end. I can’t just watch the leader of the defense walk out and lose his job. It’s a really hard situation and it’s just real life. 

“It’s just this industry and it’s really cutthroat. So part of me really felt for him. But a part of me realized he probably wants me to rally around the guys in the locker room and he probably wants me out there giving it my all each and every day and not worrying about him, because it’s about Notre Dame. It’s about Notre Dame winning football games, so we just have to come in, positive mentality, and move forward.” 

On the offensive side of the ball, both quarterback DeShone Kizer and left tackle Mike McGlinchey said they fully trust Kelly to do what’s right for the team. And in this case, that meant making a change at defensive coordinator. 

“We lost a great coach, but things needed to happen for us to move forward,” Kizer said. “Coach Kelly makes the decision. We trust in whatever he has to say, and moving forward we'll make the adjustments that need to be made on the offensive side of the ball to pick up our defense and to start playing games and getting W’s.”

“The reaction from us is that football is the way it is and coach Kelly felt that there needed to be a change, and so we made it,” McGlinchey added. “And obviously it's tough when it's a mid-season change and guys are connected to coach VanGorder, and have a guy on our team that is his son (reserve quarterback and holder Montgomery VanGorder). But at the same time everybody understands that changes needed to be made, and that's the decision that coach Kelly made. So we all are behind it.”

Notre Dame players talked quite a bit about how enjoyable practice was on Tuesday and Wednesday, which would seem to fly in the face of the team’s 1-3 record and uncertain chances of becoming bowl eligible this year. Kelly said he fired VanGorder as part of an effort to bring more passion and fun to a team in need of a spark, but knew the decision wouldn’t sit well with everyone on his team. 

Regardless of how the move was received, it’s the one that was made. And Notre Dame needs its defense to play better going forward, otherwise a season that’s teetering on the brink of disaster could go careening over the edge. 

“He was really the one that gave me the opportunity and spent the time and invested in me to be able to play defense and to be able to be where I'm at today,” Onwualu said in describing the conversation he had with VanGorder after his firing. “So just a quick thanks for the opportunity and the time that you spent with me. I don't think it's a huge good-bye. It's like anybody you work with, right? It's a business, you know. Stay in contact and I hope your next step is a good one.”

For Notre Dame, prepare like a champion maybe 'should be our new mantra’

For Notre Dame, prepare like a champion maybe 'should be our new mantra’

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — The “Play Like a Champion Today” sign in the cramped stairwell from the home locker room to the tunnel at Notre Dame Stadium has been a staple of tradition on this campus for decades. But at 1-3, maybe the 2016 Irish need to change that slogan a bit. 

“You have to put everything that you can into each drill, each snap, each everything in this game,” offensive lineman and captain Mike McGlinchey said. “You can't overlook any detail. You can't leave any stone left unturned. It's so important that you prepare as a champion just as much as you want to play like one. And maybe that should be our new mantra.”

Notre Dame has had 10 underclassmen or first-time starters make starts this year, with a host of other inexperienced players seeing significant playing time, too. Right now, the team’s 1-3 record — with that only win coming over an entirely overmatched Nevada side — is a stern reminder of how sub-standard practices during the week can affect what happens on Saturday. 

“You wake up pretty fast when you're 1 and 3,” McGlinchey said. “… What we have felt that good preparation is hasn't been good enough, and we will continue to ramp that up and continue to fight for the best play that we can. And it's about getting that understanding throughout the entire football team, whether you're a freshman or a fifth-year senior, that preparation is the most important thing in this game, and games aren't won on Saturdays in September. They're won in January in the weight room or in the summer doing your drills. And then each week it's won Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday when you're on the practice field. So if you can prepare the right way, prepare harder with the guys that we have on our team, I'm pretty confident that we can get our jobs done a little bit better.”

Linebacker and captain James Onwualu agreed with McGlinchey’s assessment. 

“We've always tried to prepare to the best of our ability,” Onwualu said. “We practice hard. I think it's just the fact that we need to start practicing a little bit smarter, and the coaches have made a couple of changes, like I said, so practices are a little bit different. Still practicing with great intensity and continuing to push these younger guys to focus in on their job.”

For Notre Dame, everything is on the table when all of a sudden bowl eligibility could be at stake. Including even tweaking, for themselves, one of college football’s most famous sayings.