Proviso West sets the holiday standard

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Proviso West sets the holiday standard

Joe Spagnolo is a familiar face around the Proviso West Holiday Tournament in Hillside, as familiar as a basketball. He has been affiliated with the state's premier event in one management position or another since 1981 and currently serves as the tournament director.

A Proviso West graduate of 1980, Spagnolo attended his first Proviso West tournament as a student in 1976. "I got hooked on high school basketball at a young age," he said.

He wasn't around for the first one, however. Walt Sawosko, then athletic director at Proviso West, was the visionary. He organized the first tournament in 1961. He started with eight teams, then expanded to 16 the following year. Next year, Spagnolo will oversee the first 32-team event.

"(Sowasko) wanted a local tournament so Chicago schools could be home during the holidays and didn't have to travel," Spagnolo said. "There was a great expansion of new schools at that time and it was easy to get new or older schools to fill the field."

At that time, the only "local" tournament was De Kalb. To compete during the holidays, schools went to Centralia or Carbondale or Pontiac. After Proviso West made its mark in the 1960s, several other tournaments were launched in the Chicago area.

"(Sowasko) was a pioneer," Spagnolo said. "He got a big bump in 1967, 1968 and 1969 when Evanston (with Bob Lackey), Proviso East (with Jim Brewer) and La Grange (with Owen Brown and Marcus Washington) won the tournament and went on to win the state title. That put Proviso West on the map."

Proviso West got another big bump in 1977, 1978 and 1979 with the presence of St. Joseph's Isiah Thomas, Westinghouse's Mark Aguirre and Proviso East's Glenn "Doc" Rivers. The future college and NBA stars were consecutive tournament MVPs and attracted huge crowds.

"The ThomasRivers game in 1978 was probably, along with the LackeyBrewer game of 1967, the two biggest crowds we've ever had at Proviso West," Spagnolo said. "The fire marshals locked the doors but some people broke down a door and let 500 people in. The capacity of the gym was 3,860 at the time and it was estimated that 4,700 people saw the game."

Two other landmark games that also attracted huge crowds were the Kevin GarnettRonnie Fields games in 1994, which marked future All-Pro Kevin Garnett's first appearance on a big stage in Chicago, and Jon Scheyer's spectacular performance in 2005 when the Glenbrook North star scored 21 points in 75 seconds with future coach Mike Krzyzewski of Duke watching.

"(Scheyer) was the modern highlight," Spagnolo said. "That was voted as the No. 1 moment in the 50-year celebration of the tournament. He went on to become the tournament's all-time leading scorer.

"But what nobody remembers is that Proviso West won the game. Glenbrook North was the defending champion, unbeaten and ranked No. 1 in the state but Proviso West won the quarterfinal game 85-79."

Proviso West's success spawned other holiday tournaments. Elgin left in the early 1970s to form its own event. York left in 1972 to launch its own tournament. And Rich Central left to help form the Big Dipper tournament at Rich South.

Some people never leave, however. Bill Heimann, a Proviso graduate, attended the first tournament and still buys a season ticket. He sits next to Tom Clancy, who one-time resident of Wood River near St. Louis, who has been attending the event since 1970.

Timer Steve Busa, a Proviso West graduate of 1976, is in his 29th year at the scoring table. And public address announcer Dick Clish, a Morton graduate and former Proviso West principal, has been working since 1985.

"Our mission is to promote high school basketball," Spagnolo said. "We say: 'Proviso West is where basketball is best.' We want everyone to enjoy what we have, paying customers or referees or participants. We think it is a special event and more people want to get involved in it."

It is a big undertaking, like a little city for four days. More than 100 workers are employed. It is the only tournament that has officials who work only one game. Spagnolo handpicks 84 different officials, the biggest corps of officials for any tournament in the nation. Peter King started in 1983 and has worked the most consecutive years. Jim Bernardi started in 1978 and still is working. John Dacey, who started in 1984, has worked more games than anyone else.

"We have had 88 different officials who worked our tournament and also worked the state finals," Spagnolo said. "Rich Weiler worked the 1962 Proviso West final and the NCAA final in 1980."

But Proviso West no longer is the only game in town. It spawned competition. Attendance is down across the board. Proviso West has had only one sellout since 2007. And the capacity of the main gym has been reduced to 2,990 with the construction of new seats in 2007.

"There are a lot more things for people to do, more tournaments to see," Spagnolo said. "Years ago, you had to go to a game to see it. Now you can see it on TV or the Internet or Twitter or e-mail. There are so many ways to get information."

For example, this year's Proviso West tournament can be seen on the Internet on Proviso West's website, pwhoops.com. CN100, Comcast Sports Net Chicago's suburban outlet, will tape delay the third place and championship games for re-telecast on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1.

The 51st tournament will be Dec. 27-30. Opening-round pairings will pit Morgan Park vs. Hinsdale Central, Glenbrook North vs. St. Patrick, New Trier vs. Fenwick, Homewood-Flossmoor vs. Von Steuben in the upper bracket and Hillcrest vs. Morton, Rockford Auburn vs. Proviso West, Proviso East vs. Brooks and St. Joseph vs. Benet in the lower bracket.

Proviso West's all-time tournament team? Spagnolo admits it is hard to argue with a starting five of Isiah Thomas, Kevin Garnett, Mark Aguirre, Glenn "Doc" Rivers and Jon Scheyer.

"I agree with the first four. I always had Isiah, Rivers and Aguirre on my top team. And Garnett is a no-brainer. The fifth was up for debate. Before Scheyer, I voted for Jim Brewer and Marcus Liberty. But after what Scheyer did, there is no doubt that he gets the fifth spot. Now he is part of folklore."

Just like the tournament itself.

Fast Break Morning Update: Blackhawks win, Jimmy Butler starts All-Star Game

Fast Break Morning Update: Blackhawks win, Jimmy Butler starts All-Star Game

Here are some of Sunday's top stories in Chicago sports:

Jimmy Butler: 'Hopefully I’m not going to get traded'

Patrick Kane leads Blackhawks to win in Buffalo homecoming

What Joe Maddon wants to see next from Javier Baez

Jose Abreu ready for 2017 after season full of 'different challenges'

Wojnarowski: Bulls-Celtics Jimmy Butler trade talks 'will loom over the entire week'

After surreal offseason, Ben Zobrist comes to Cubs camp in style as World Series MVP

White Sox rookie Charlie Tilson out at least 10 days with foot injury

Fire score five goals for fourth preseason win

Simeon beats rival Morgan Park for city championship

Former Northwestern football player Torri Stuckey now focuses on helping others

Jimmy Butler: 'Hopefully I’m not going to get traded'

Jimmy Butler: 'Hopefully I’m not going to get traded'

NEW ORLEANS — Every All-Star isn’t created equal, even by the slimmest of margins as the best 24 NBA players take their turn on the midseason stage.

So Jimmy Butler being announced among the first five as an All-Star starter had to represent some form of validation, now that he’s not a novice at the whole experience and he’s able to go through the motions of the hectic weekend without breaking much of a sweat.

But despite being a three-time All-Star and routinely mentioned as one of the game’s top 15 players or even top 10, he can’t shake the trade rumors that have seemed to follow him since this time last season.

As he finished up his All-Star experience at Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, clarity was nowhere to be found—although heading to some tropical island for a couple days to actually unwind with clear water and warm air seemed to be the best therapy if he’s stressed by the uncertainty of the next few days.

“What’s Thursday? Oh, trade deadline,” Butler said. “I don’t know. I don’t know. Am I anxious? Come on, man. I don’t worry about it. It don’t bother or scare me none.”

“Hopefully I’m not going to get traded but I don’t know. I don’t control that. Control what I can control, like going on vacation.”

Surely it has to be frustrating for a guy who’s elevated his game yet again, averaging 24.5 points, 6.3 rebounds, 5.0 assists and 1.8 steals for the Bulls in 51 games. But he refuses to let it damper his All-Star spirits, playing with some of the best players in the world and a few guys he calls friends, like DeAndre Jordan and Kevin Durant.

“Not for me,” said Butler of the potential stress. “Not saying I’m untradeable but I don’t think about that. If I’m not in a Bulls uniform, I’ll give you a hug and say goodbye to you.”

Moments after Butler made his statement in the media room, the floodgates opened for the trade market as fellow Olympian DeMarcus Cousins was traded from the Sacramento Kings to the New Orleans Pelicans for what seemed to be mere fodder, pennies on the dollar for the most talented center in the NBA.

[SHOP: Get your Bulls gear right here]

While Cousins is far more of a handful than Butler could be, the trade almost signals a consistent truth that always bears repeating—that short of a select few, anybody can be traded.

Even a franchise altering talent like Cousins, who was traded to the city he was physically in for All-Star weekend, and included in the package of players was a guy who hit him in the groin last week (Buddy Hield), resulting in a Cousins outburst and ejection.

Butler has made his name with the Bulls, although not necessarily on the All-Star stage, a player who values defense and doesn’t have as much flash as some of the game’s shinier players.

With a six-point outing in 20 minutes, Butler was an on-court afterthought despite being a starter for the first time.

“Six? Should’ve gone for eight,” he sarcastically deadpanned.

In a relatively jovial mood through the weekend, Butler joked about the talk surrounding him and tried to brush it off as mere chatter as opposed to the franchise not seeing enough in him to make a firm commitment for the long-term, as the Boston Celtics are always hovering.

League sources expect the Celtics to engage the Bulls in conversations for the next few days, but nobody has a great feel for what either side is truly looking for.

But as Butler insisted, he’s only controlling what he can control, which is making himself a fixture for All-Star games to come as opposed to some of the first-timers who don’t know if they’ll get back here again.

“I think I got two underneath my belt,” Butler said. “I know what they’re feeling the first time, It’s so surreal like maybe I do belong here. That’s how I was thinking. Now it’s how do I get here every year? I think that’s the fun part, that’s the challenge. A lot of those guys have done it 10-plus years, hopefully I’m one.”

The only question seems to be, which uniform will it be in because the crazy season has begun.