Random News of the Day: Me, myself and I (and Brett)

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Random News of the Day: Me, myself and I (and Brett)

Thursday, Aug. 19, 201012:40 PM

By Joe CollinsCSNChicago.com
I would like to show you an excerpt of my column from Aug. 20, 2009:

From The Research Department: I found a full copy of Brett Favre's introductory press conference from Tuesday August 19th and I found that Queen Favre used the words "I", "I've", "I'm", "I'll", "Me", "My", "Myself" or "Mine" a combined 235 times. Just the "I" words alone were uttered 191 times. And amazingly, that number is twice as much as the amount of times he used the word "the" (90). The tally:I - 180I've - 4I'm - 6I'll - 1Me - 22My - 18Myself - 3Mine - 1And get this -- the number of times he used the word "we" in that same press conference? Only 19. Or how about the number of times he used the word "us"? ZERO.
Fast-forward to Wednesday. Same scenario. Same podium. Same goofy grin. Same aw-shucks-I'm-back routine. Same Q&A nonsense a day after TV news stations followed Favre from the airport to the Vikings training facility. Sound familiar? Makes me wonder if his 2010 introductory press conference was any different word-wise than the one from last year. The Minnesota Vikings Web site has a transcript of Brett's comments.

Let's break it down:

I: 240
I've: 7
I'm: 23
I'll: 6
I'd: 3
Me: 19
Mine: 3
My: 22
Myself: 3
We: 35
Us: 7
Team: 19
OurOurs: 4

Hey look! He actually used the word "us" seven times! He's getting better!

But not really. A couple of interesting points to ponder:

Brett Favre used a form of the word "I" (I, I've, I'm I'll, and I'd) a combined 279 times. His press conference was 33 12 minutes long. That works out to an average of 8.32 "I" words per minute. If you want to tack on the "Me" words (me, mine, my, myself), the average soars to 9.73 "selfish" words per minute.

Favre was asked about the Jeep story with Ryan Longwell (sixth question in the press conference). He answered the question using the word "I" 59 times in his answer. Fifty ... nine. Try duplicating that. I dare you.

Anybody else find it amusing that he used the words "me" and "team" the same number of times (19)?

In fairness, Favre's actions truly speak louder than his words. Two-hundred-eighty-five consecutive starts -- or 309 if you count the playoffs -- tells you that alone. The guy can play. Might throw a wobbler into double-coverage every now and then, but he still can play. And I'm sure most Vikings fans would welcome him in right now, given the current talent at the quarterback position.

But his selfishness and self-centeredness, intentional or not given the situation, especially considering the media hype, is beyond repair. I have seen a myriad of reactions by my fellow sports producers and other friends, which have ranged from the passive-aggressive ("Ha ... another news crew following Brett in a black SUV going down a highway. I wonder if he's in the back seat talking with O.J") to the flat-out aggressive ("GIVE me the remote! I'd rather watch 'Cheaters' or 'Maury Povich' right now").

I also feel sorry for my fellow sports journalists in the Twin Cities that have to put up with this annual media circus. I can't imagine the stress level involved for having to follow every breath he takes (cue that song from The Police). Maybe they like this kind of adrenaline rush, I don't know. But whether you're a Brett Favre fan or not, you have to be shaking your head at this mind-boggling showcase of self-centeredness year in and year out. It borders on nauseating. But we all fall for it in some capacity. You get vacuumed into the hype machine and there's not much you can do about it. No matter what, the guy's star power has some kind of impact on you as a sports fan.

I can tell you how it plays a role in my life: the movie "There's Something About Mary" is forever tarnished. Even though Favre has a minor role, it's enough for me to temporarily change the channel.

To "Cheaters", maybe.

Or something like that.

Joe Collins is an assignment desk editor for Comcast SportsNet and contributor to CSNChicago.com.

Blackhawks blow three-goal lead, fall in OT at Lightning

Blackhawks blow three-goal lead, fall in OT at Lightning

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) -- Yanni Gourde had a breakaway goal 4:25 into overtime and the Tampa Bay Lightning rallied from a three-goal deficit to beat the Chicago Blackhawks 5-4 on Monday night.

Victor Hedman set up the winner with his third assist of the game.

Tampa Bay, which trails Boston by a point for the second Eastern Conference wild card, also got two goals from Jonathan Drouin. Ondrej Palat and Anton Stralman also scored, and Andrei Vasilevskiy, who got pulled 14 minutes into the first after allowing three goals on eight shots, returned to the start the second and finished with 25 saves.

Artemi Panarin, Patrick Kane, Tomas Jurco and Richard Panik scored for the Western Conference-leading Blackhawks, who were coming off a 7-0 loss Saturday night at Florida. Scott Darling stopped 25 shots.

Cubs will have Ian Happ one phone call away at Triple-A Iowa

Cubs will have Ian Happ one phone call away at Triple-A Iowa

MESA, Ariz. – After an impressive camp where he looked like the next homegrown Cubs hitter to roll off the assembly line, Ian Happ will go to Triple-A Iowa and get ready to make his big-league debut, or perhaps build his value for a trade-deadline deal.

Along with Happ, the Cubs assigned outfielder John Andreoli and catcher Taylor Davis to minor-league camp on Monday while optioning pitchers Eddie Butler and Rob Zastryzny to Iowa, cutting their roster to 31 as the Opening Night picture comes into focus.

Happ – the ninth overall pick in the 2015 draft out of the University of Cincinnati – batted .417 with five homers, four doubles and 17 RBI in 24 Cactus League games.

"Offensively, what was there not to like?" general manager Jed Hoyer said. "I feel like he hit the ball hard every at-bat for six weeks. It's always fun to see a young guy like that come in and open a lot of eyes."

Happ, 22, is a switch-hitter who can play second base and the outfield, skills that could help him escape from Des Moines once the need arises on the major-league level.

[MORE CUBS: How Cubs came to fully believe in the legend of Kyle Schwarber]

Though there are questions about Happ's defense, Theo Epstein's front office and Joe Maddon's coaching staff clearly value versatility and trust young talent, moving Addison Russell to shortstop in 2015 and elevating rookie catcher Willson Contreras last season.

Stay tuned to see when/if the Cubs will have a spot at Wrigley Field, but Happ looks like he will be on a fast track.

"Whenever you're in Triple-A, you're always a call away," Hoyer said. "Sometimes it happens quicker than you think. We never expected Addie would be up in April of that year, and he was. I feel like with Willson last year, if you had asked me in spring training – would he be up in June? – I probably would have thought it would be more like a September call-up or something like that.

"You never know. Things happen. When you have good players in the minor leagues, sometimes it speeds up on you a little bit."