Chicago White Sox

Recalling the saga of Homer Thurman

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Recalling the saga of Homer Thurman

Jerry Colangelo, who knows a lot of the history and tradition of Bloom Township's sports program and has written a lot of history of his own as the one-time owner of the Phoenix Suns of the NBA and the Arizona Diamondbacks baseball franchise, recalls with notes of sadness and admiration the last time he spent time with Homer Thurman.

Colangelo and Thurman were teammates on Bloom's 1957 basketball team that lost to Elgin 53-52 in the supersectional. Colangelo has said that it was the most disappointing loss he has ever experienced in his high school, college and professional sports career.

"When I was a sophomore at Illinois, I got permission from Tug Wilson (commissioner of the Big 10) to put on a summer tournament in Chicago Heights," said Colangelo, now director of USA Basketball. "I had the best players in the Midwest playing in the event. I was looking for Homer Thurman. I found him in jail. He looked scruffy and hadn't touched a basketball in so long.

"Well, he had a hamburger and some French fries and stepped on the court like he never missed a beat. He was the MVP in the tournament. He was an amazing story. He disappeared right after that. He is a tragic story, a great talent who went to waste."

Thurman arguably was one of the most outstanding multi-sport athletes ever produced in Illinois. Those who saw him compete in football, basketball and track and field insist he should be mentioned in the same discussion with Dike Eddleman, Lou Boudreau, Otto Graham, Ted Kluszewski, Jack Bastable, Mike Conley, LaMarr Thomas, Howard Jones, Quinn Buckner, Tai Streets, and his teammate at Bloom, Leroy Jackson.
"He occurred out of nowhere," Colangelo recalled. "He made the varsity as a freshman at Bloom at a time (in the 1950s) when the school was a factory for sports. It was no small feat. He ended up as a starter. He became one of the greatest athletes Bloom ever had.

"When he graduated from high school in 1959, in terms of talent, he was as talented an athlete as I had ever seen at that age. Unfortunately, he had other issues that went along with the package. But he could have had a terrific college career and maybe a professional career."

Thurman, a 6-foot-4, 225-pounder, was a two-time All-Stater in basketball. He scored 1,619 points in four years and averaged 17.59 per game.

He was a freshman on Bloom's 18-2 team in 1956 that lost to Oak Park 62-57 in the supersectional at Hinsdale, On a team with Colangelo, Bobby Bell and Chuck Green, he was the leading scorer with 20 points.

As a sophomore in 1957, Thurman and Bell each scored 15 points as Bloom lost to Elgin 53-52 in the supersectional at Hinsdale and finished 22-2.

He made enough of a lasting impression that he has been named among 10 players chosen in the second class in the pre-1960s era who will be inducted into the Illinois High School Basketball Hall of Fame and Museum in Pinckneyville. The class will be honored on Nov. 3 in Champaign.

He also was an All-State end on Bloom's unbeaten 1957 football team that featured All-State running back Leroy Jackson, a three-time state sprint champion who later played for the Washington Redskins in the NFL.

In track and field, he was third in the high jump I the 1957 state finals and won the event in 1958. He also led off the winning mile relay in 1958. As a senior, he was fifth in the long jump and ran a leg on the winning 880-yard relay. He competed on four state championship track and field teams.

Thurman was born in Ittabena, Mississippi. The family moved to Chicago Heights and settled on 13th Street and Shields. Homer was a high-strung and temperamental individual. Longtime friend Homer Dillard said his life changed when his mother died in 1959.

"He was never able to relax," Dillard said. "A lot of people in Chicago Heights liked him. But he had no supervision. So many people expected him to do so much. They said he would be the next Oscar Robertson. But when his mother died, something died in him. He didn't want to work as hard."

Thurman was recruited by Iowa during the time of the Connie Hawkins scandal. Homer left after one semester and landed at Midland Lutheran in Fremont, Nebraska. He was a black star in a white community. In 1962, he married Janet Bartling, the daughter of a local newspaper publisher. The couple went to Chicago to be married and to establish a residence. At the time, Thurman became a student at Crane College.

In November of 1962, Thurman had a tryout with the Harlem Globetrotters. He didn't make the team. At the same time, his personal life was crumbling. He left his wife and two children. In 1965, his wife was granted a divorce. She returned to Fremont to live with her parents and children.

"I was always able to find him and get him to play o one of my summer teams," said Dillard, a Bloom graduate of 1957. "But I last saw him in 1974. He was in a hurry. I spotted him walking on the side of the street. He had a cape on and looked like Dracula. A guitar hung around his neck. He said that he couldn't talk and that he'd see me later. I never saw him again.

"He decided he was going to be a musician. He had a guitar and a book to self-teach himself on the guitar. He spent a lot of time learning how to play the guitar. One story was he went to California to play with a band. He is like hearing stories about Elvis. One person saw him in a movie. Another person saw him here or there, a brief shot."

Dillard said Leroy Jackson, not Thurman, was the greatest athlete in Bloom history. But he was very good at everything he did. He didn't play baseball in high school but he was a very good baseball player, as well as basketball, football and track and field.

"In basketball, he was ahead of his time in a lot of things he was doing," Dillard said. "He had small hands. He couldn't palm the ball.

Whatever sport he picked, he could have done well. He had the type of concentration to do it. He was very intense whenever he decided to do something. He put himself into it. He would prepare himself to play a game. That's part of what made him a very good athlete."

Bobby Bell remembers his old teammate, Thurman. "The last I heard was his cousin told me he had seen him in San Francisco. I also heard he was dead. He was a sportsman. He could do it all. He was intelligent, a great natural talent. What went wrong with him was when his mother died and left him alone. Then he was on his own," Bell said.

Alan Macey, a sportswriter with the Chicago Heights Star and the Southtown Star from 1976 to 2011, tried to find Thurman.

Years ago, sports editor John E. Meyers of the Chicago Heights Star assigned Macey to do a series on the great athletes of the south suburbs titled "Do you remember?" Macey even put a former FBI agent on Thurman's trail but he kept running into one dead end after another.

"It was a very frustrating journey," Macey said. "The great Homer Thurman. Is he still alive? God only knows. He could be the greatest three-sport high school athlete who decided to be lost forever."

Lucas Giolito puts together another strong outing in White Sox loss to Astros

Lucas Giolito puts together another strong outing in White Sox loss to Astros

HOUSTON — He didn’t have his best stuff against baseball’s top offense on Tuesday night, but Lucas Giolito had his changeup.

The young White Sox pitcher showed once again that when he has confidence in an offspeed pitch he’s able to overcome situations where his fastball might not be as good as he’d prefer. Trust in the changeup and a good command of the fastball were more than enough to put together another strong performance.

While Giolito took the decision in a 3-1 White Sox loss to the Houston Astros, he once again earned plaudits for his pitching.

“He was really good,” Houston manager A.J. Hinch said. “His changeup's very good. He obviously can spin a couple different breaking balls. It looks like a heavy fastball. So, a really impressive young starter to be able to navigate the lineup in different ways and get guys out in different ways and really compete.”

Perhaps no one hitter better demonstrated Giolito’s ability to compete than his sixth-inning showdown with Astros No. 5 hitter Marwin Gonzalez. Having just issued his first walk down 2-1 with two outs and a man on second, Giolito threw both his two- and four-seam fastball, changeup and curveball during a lengthy at-bat. With the count full, Gonzalez fouled off six consecutive fastballs before Giolito threw a changeup in the dirt for the whiff on the 12th pitch of the at-bat.

It was one of 18 changeups Giolito threw, with 11 going for strikes.

“The changeup was a good pitch for me aside from a few I left up in the zone,” Giolito said. “I had a lot of confidence in it and that was probably the offspeed pitch I was most comfortable going to in situations.”

Given his fastball velo was an average of 92.2 mph, confidence and comfort were critical. Houston entered the game with a team slash line of .282/.345/.479 and averaging 5.47 runs per contest. The American League West champions offer few easy outs and were clearly the sternest test to date for Giolito, who has never pitched more innings in a season than his current 167 between Triple-A Charlotte and the majors.

Even though the velo isn’t where he’s wanted it in the past two outings, Giolito has pitched well enough. Giolito produced his fourth quality start in six outings in the big leagues as he limited the Astros to two earned runs and seven hits in 6 2/3 innings. He walked one and struck out three.

“Felt pretty good about it,” Giolito said. “It was one of those days where I didn’t have my best stuff working. Had a lot of trouble getting the ball to the extension side. That’s something to work on this week going into the next start. But I felt good about how I pitched tonight for sure.”

The White Sox feel pretty good about the production they’ve received from Giolito, who struggled with consistency earlier this season at Triple-A and dropped down in the prospect rankings as a result. The right-hander said he’s pleased with how he’s learned to be more composed on the mound this season. He’s also clearly gained confidence and trust in his stuff.

“Based on everything we saw, the skill set that he would be able to manage his ability on the mound to attack the strike zone,” manager Rick Renteria said. “He’s throwing his breaking ball more effectively now, the changeup as well.”

“All in all he’s doing what he needs to do. He’s kept hitters off balance. His ball has some life. He has angle. We’re happy with how he’s continued to develop.”

Giolito’s offense didn’t do what it needed to earn him a victory despite another big night from Yoan Moncada. Moncada went 3-for-4 with three singles and shortstop Tim Anderson extended his hitting streak to 10 games with a ninth-inning single.

Joe Maddon finally sees Cubs playing with the right 'mental energy'

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USA TODAY

Joe Maddon finally sees Cubs playing with the right 'mental energy'

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Joe Maddon looked back on the perfect baseball storm that hit the Tampa Bay Rays and played all the greatest hits for local reporters, waxing poetic about the banners hanging inside Tropicana Field, stumping for a new stadium on the other side of the Gandy Bridge, telling Don Zimmer stories, namedropping Bucs quarterback Jameis Winston and riffing on sabermetrics and information buckets.

But the moment of clarity came in the middle of a media session that lasted 20-plus minutes, Maddon sitting up on stage in what felt like the locker room at an old CYO gym: “We only got really good because the players got really good.”

There’s no doubt the Cubs have the talent to go along with all the other big-market advantages the Rays could only dream about as the have-nots in the American League East. Now it looks like the defending champs have finally got rid of the World Series hangover, playing with the urgency and pitch-to-pitch focus that had been lacking at times and will be needed again in October.    

Maddon essentially admitted it after Tuesday’s 2-1 victory, watching his team beat Chris Archer and work together on a one-hitter that extended the winning streak to seven games and kept the Milwaukee Brewers 3.5 games back in the National League Central.

“You’re really seeing them try to execute in moments,” Maddon said. “When they come back and they don’t get it done, it’s not like they’re angry. But you can just see they’re disappointed in themselves.

“Their mental energy is probably at an all-season-high right now.”

Six days after the Cubs moved him to the bullpen, lefty swingman Mike Montgomery took a no-hitter into the sixth inning, when Tampa Bay’s No. 9 hitter (Brad Miller) drove a ball over the center-field wall. Maddon then went to the relievers he will trust in October – Pedro Strop, Carl Edwards Jr., Wade Davis – with the All-Star closer striking out the side in the ninth inning and remaining perfect in save opportunities (32-for-32) as a Cub.       

“We want to go out there and prove every day that we’re the best team in baseball,” said Kyle Schwarber, the designated hitter who launched Archer’s 96-mph fastball into the right-center field seats for his 28th home run in the second inning. “The way our guys are just going out there and competing, it’s really good to see, especially this time of year. It’s getting to crunch time, and we just got to keep this same pace that we’re going at.

“Don’t worry about things around us. Just keep our heads down, keep worrying about the game and go from there.”     

In what’s been a season-long victory lap, Maddon couldn’t help looking back when the sound system started playing The Beach Boys and “Good Vibrations” echoed throughout the domed stadium, a tribute running on the video board and a crowd of 25,046 giving him a standing ovation.

“It was cool,” Maddon said. “I forgot about the bird, the cockatoo, I can’t remember the name. Really a cool bird. I told (my wife) Jaye I wanted one of those for a while. But then again, she gets stuck taking care of them.

“I was just thinking about all the things we did. You forget sometimes that snake. I think her name was Francine, like a 19-year-old, 20-footer. And then the penguin on my chair. You forget all the goofy stuff you did. But you can see how much fun everybody had.

“I appreciated it. They showed all my pertinent highlights. There’s none actually as a player. It’s primarily as a zookeeper.”

But within the last week, you can see the Cubs getting more serious, concentrating on their at-bats and nailing their pitches. There is internal competition for roster spots and playing time in the postseason, when Maddon becomes ruthless and doesn’t care at all about making friends. This just might be another perfect storm.

Montgomery – who notched the final out in the 10th inning of last year’s World Series Game 7 – put it this way: “I feel ready for anything after how this year’s gone.”