Chicago White Sox

See why Phil withdrew from The Memorial

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See why Phil withdrew from The Memorial

From Comcast SportsNet
DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) -- Phil Mickelson hit the wall and then headed for the exit, withdrawing from the Memorial after a 79 on Thursday because of mental fatigue. Mickelson said it was more important for him to be rested for the U.S. Open in two weeks than to finish Jack Nicklaus' tournament. He attributed the fatigue to playing three straight weeks, and then going to Europe to celebrate his wife's 40th birthday. He returned home to play a corporate outing Tuesday in New York, flew to Ohio for the pro-am and found his head wasn't in the game. "The course here is in such great shape. It's a beautiful way to get ready for the U.S. Open," he said. "But I'm hitting it so poorly that ... I have to look at what's best for me to play in the U.S. Open, and I'm going to take the next few days to kind of rest up." It's not unusual for players to withdraw after a high score -- it was Mickelson's worst in the 13 trips to the Memorial -- and three other players withdrew Thursday. But it's rare when the player is of Mickelson's stature, a four-time major champion inducted this month into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Mickelson could not think of another time he withdrew without physical injury. "I feel like it's the responsibility of a player to see through your commitment and finish the tournament and so forth," Mickelson said. "And I'm kind of overruling that just a touch, because I'm trying to think big picture on what's the best way for me to get ready for the Open." The last time Mickelson withdrew was also at the Memorial in 2007, only then he had injured his wrist while practicing out of the rough at Oakmont for the U.S. Open, and he stopped after 11 holes. Mickelson wound up missing the cut at Oakmont. Mickelson played Quail Hollow, The Players Championship and the Byron Nelson Championship, and then headed to France and Italy with his wife, Amy. "We had a great time, but I think I probably just went a little bit overboard last month, and it has nothing to do with playing poorly and so forth," he said. "But I do think I need to get rested to play my best for the Open." Mickelson said he likely would see swing coach Butch Harmon to "get things straightened out," and go up to The Olympic Club in San Francisco to study the course. Mickelson has finished runner-up a record five times in his national open. Whether it was more than fatigue, Mickelson wasn't saying. His group, which included Masters champion Bubba Watson and Rickie Fowler, had a massive gallery with several fans taking pictures with their cellphones. Watson complained about the cellphones, though Mickelson said it was "more that mentally I wasn't able to focus as well from the last month." But it's not unlike Mickelson to deliver a message, regardless of criticism that comes his way. When he and Tiger Woods first talked about the PGA Tour season being too long in 2005, Mickelson cited personal reasons for skipping the Tour Championship. He also skipped the BMW Championship during the first year of the FedEx Cup playoffs. He was no fan of Cog Hill, though that WD was said to be more about a debate with the tour. Mickelson was even par for the tournament with a birdie on the par-5 11th, and then he played 7-over par the rest of the way, including a tee shot into the water on the par-3 16th for a double bogey. "I knew he was struggling throughout the day," Fowler said. "You could tell he was a little tired. He's been traveling a bit lately. He told us there in the trailer when we were signing the cards. Obviously, it was a little bit of a grind out there today." Fowler said players had to restart their pre-shot routines because of the pictures being taken by fans. "You could see Phil was a little fatigued and was having trouble blocking it out a bit," Fowler said. Watson said the phones have been "pretty bad ever since they made that rule" that allows fans to take phones on the course, although pictures are not allowed and there are designated areas to make calls. "When they make these marquee pairings, more people are going to follow them and more people want to take pictures, so it makes it very difficult," Watson said. "Ever since they made that rule that cellphones are allowed, it's just not fun playing. "It took Phil out of his game," Watson said. "Phil's a great player and a great champion, and it just took him out of his game. It's sad. It's sad that cellphones can make or break a championship."

White Sox continue dealing, trade Dan Jennings to Rays for prospect

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White Sox continue dealing, trade Dan Jennings to Rays for prospect

The White Sox continued their run of trades on Thursday morning, dealing relief pitcher Dan Jennings to the Tampa Bay Rays in exchange for Casey Gillaspie.

Gillaspie, 24, was rated by MLB.com as the No. 10 prospect in the Rays organization. The switch-hitting first baseman batted .227 with nine homers, 44 RBIs and 45 runs scored in 95 games for AAA Durham.

The 6-foot-4, 240-pound left-hander began the year ranked as the No. 74 prospect in baseball by Baseball America entering the year and was a Southern League All-Star in 2016.  The first-round pick in 2014 was a New York-Penn League All-Star that year and a Midwest League All-Star in 2015.

“Casey is a recent first-round pick who has shown a quality approach at the plate with some power throughout his minor-league career,” general manager Rick Hahn said. “He gives us yet another highly touted hitter who has stood out at every level in the Rays system and increases our organizational depth as we continue to add prospects to the system.”

Casey is the young brother of Conor Gillaspie, who spent three seasons with the White Sox from 2013 to 2015.

Jennings went 3-1 with a 3.45 ERA in 48 appearances for the White Sox this season, his 48 appearances are tied for second in the American League.

St. Rita RB Chris Childers commits to Indiana State

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USA TODAY

St. Rita RB Chris Childers commits to Indiana State

St. Rita senior running back Chris Childers (5-foot-11, 180 pounds) decided late last week to end his recruiting process and gave Indiana State his verbal commitment.

"Indiana State had been recruiting me since the spring when they stopped into school," according to Childers. "I went and visited Indiana State and had a great visit and that's when I committed."

Childers was drawing recruiting interest from Syracuse, Minnesota along with Illinois State, Southern Illinois, Eastern Illinois and North Dakota State before giving Indiana State his verbal commitment. Childers is also the fifth known Chicagoland commitment for the Sycamores joining Linblom WR CJ Rutherford, Carmel WR Shaneal Greene, Bishop McNamara DB Giavion Mason and Simeon defensive tackle Tierre Taylor.

Phillips junior tight end Jahleel Billingsly (6-foot-5, 230 pounds) was able to add his first offer from Purdue after an impressive Boilermakers one day camp performance last Friday at Purdue.

"The Purdue coaches came up to me during the camp and said that they wanted to be the first school to offer me a scholarship,: according to Billingsly.  "I was also able to look around at Purdue a bit and everything was really nice. I was able to see the campus and I also saw the brand new facility that

Purdue is building. Everything was just really nice at Purdue and I also got along great with the coaches. I was a bit surprised to get an offer from Purdue. We are getting towards the end of the summer and I just assumed that most of the coaches would wait until during the season before they would offer me."

Billingsly has also drawn recruiting looks so far this summer from Minnesota, North Carolina, Arkansas, NIU and Missouri.

Waubonsie Valley senior three star ranked tight end Charles Robinson (6-foot-4, 220 pounds) remains one of the top remaining uncommitted names in the Class of 2018. So what's Robinson's plan for his recruiting process?

"I have no clue right now to be honest," Robinson said. "I want to wait until I truly feel the school I pick is the perfect fit for me. I have no favorites. I want to go to a Mississippi State game this fall for a game. I also want to go to an Iowa game, a Georgia game and an Illinois game."

Crystal Lake South four star ranked offensive tackle recruit Trevor Keegan (6-foot-6, 290 pounds) made a recent unofficial visit to Penn State and came away with an offer from the Nittany Lions.

"Penn State was pretty cool," according to Keegan. "I just really get along well with the Penn State coaches and I really like those guys. I was just impressed with the overall mentality at Penn State and just how focused everyone is at working hard and getting better every day. I was also able to tour the campus and see the facilities and I had maybe the best ice creme I've ever had at the Penn State Creamery. It was also great to add an offer from Penn State on my visit. The trip to Penn State went really smooth and it was a lot shorter than I had expected. Overall I had a good visit to Penn State."

Keegan is also hoping to attend some college game days this fall at LSU, Penn State, Michigan and Oklahoma.