The Starting Five: Bulls vs. Pistons

The Starting Five: Bulls vs. Pistons

Sunday, Dec. 26, 2010
5:00 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

DETROITBulls television analyst Stacey King will not be in attendance at Sundays game against the Pistons, after the death of his mother, Lois Jean King, Saturday evening. She was 75. Bulls radio analyst Bill Wennington will join play-by-play man Neil Funk in Kings absence, while Chuck Swirsky will handle radio duties alone Sunday. CSNChicago.com expresses its condolences.

1. In the wake of Derrick Roses three free-throw attemptsdespite repeatedly getting hitSaturday against the Knicks, Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau discussed the All-Star point guards lack of whistles going to the hole prior to Sundays game. We want him to get to the line more and we dont want him to not drive because hes not getting the calls. We want him to continue to attack and hes got to drive with force, which he does. I think he drives with speed and when he gets hit, he should be getting the calls. The one thing that he doesnt do is he doesnt exaggerate contact and sometimes in this league, thats what you have to do. Thats probably something that he can work on, butI dont want him to change anything that hes doing. I think a big part of who he is and what makes him so special is when hes attacking in transition. When hes coming at you with a head of steam, I want him to get to the rim as quickly as he can and then make his decision at the rim. I think as time goes on, he will get more and more calls, said Thibodeau. Hes got a great way about him. His demeanor is excellent and hes very respectful of the officials. I think at the appropriate time, he has to make his points to the officials, which I think hes getting better at. Sometimes its hard because of his speed, quickness and strength because its happening so quick, sometimes its not being recognized. But I think, in time, hell get calls.

2. Pistons center Ben Wallace talked about Chicago, his former team, before Sundays game. I think they made a lot of good changes. They got a lot of good pieces with the addition of Carlos Boozer, Brewer. Those guys know how to play and theyve been playing in a structured system where they got a lot of discipline, and you can tell it definitely helps that team out. When they get Joakim back, I only think theyre going to get that much better, Wallace told CSNChicago.com.

3. Wallace also discussed former teammate Luol Deng with CSNChicago.com. Lus a true professional. It doesnt matter what you say, what situation you put him in, you know hes going to find a way to make the best out of the situation. He got criticized when I was there, he still catches some criticism right now, but all he does is go out there and play hard and thats all you can ask, said Wallace. Sometimes, people find somebody they can pick on and thats all they do. But hes always been a professional. He just goes out, plays hard, plays his game, plays within himself and makes the most out of his opportunities.

4. Injured Bulls center Joakim Noah was mentored by Wallace upon entering the NBA, and Big Ben expressed pride in his former protgs development. Joakims not one of those guys whos happy to be out there. Hes out there making a difference. You could see the upside as a rookie. He had that drive, he had that hunger and he had that potential. Now, hes developed into a contender in this league. If he continues to play like that, hes going to be an All-Star in this league.

5. Dont forget to follow me on Twitter at @CSNBullsInsider.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Jose Quintana trade rumors and SoxFest preview

White Sox Talk Podcast: Jose Quintana trade rumors and SoxFest preview

When will a possible Jose Quintana trade go from a watch to a warning?

Chuck Garfien, Dan Hayes, Ryan McGuffey and Chris Kamka break down the Quintana trade talks and what it will be like for him this weekend at SoxFest after months of trade rumors.

The guys also discuss what the White Sox roster might look like on Opening Day, and Hayes reveals his 2016 Hall of Fame ballot.

[SHOP WHITE SOX: Get your White Sox gear right here]

Plus listen for a special White Sox Talk Podcast giveaway: two free passes to SoxFest and the chance to play bags with Garfien and Todd Frazier at SoxFest.

Check out the latest episode below:

For Tom Rees, coaching gig at Notre Dame always seemed like an inevitability

For Tom Rees, coaching gig at Notre Dame always seemed like an inevitability

The last time Tom Rees played a game for Notre Dame, he was still known as Tommy Rees — but his coach put forth an offer that didn't come as a surprise to anyone in the press room at Yankee Stadium. 

"I'm a Tommy Rees fan for life," Kelly said after Notre Dame's 2013 Pinstripe Bowl win over Rutgers. "… He'll keep trying to play the game as long as he can. But I told him, he's got a bright future as a graduate assistant for Brian Kelly anytime."

Rees is joining Notre Dame as a full-time quarterbacks coach, not just as a coach-in-training graduate assistant role. The 24-year-old — whose father, Bill, has held a number of scouting roles in the NFL — only has two coaching stops on his resume, a graduate assistant role at Northwestern in 2015 and an offensive assistant job with the San Diego Chargers last year. But his lack of experience is more than made up for by the simple fact that, while at Notre Dame from 2010-2013, there was a well-established belief held by coaches and teammates that one day the Lake Bluff, Ill. native one day would coach in some capacity. 

"I'm very excited to have Tom join our staff," Kelly said in a statement Tuesday. "He possesses an understanding of the game, and most importantly the quarterback position, that's unique. He's a true student of the game and great communicator that will offer immediate dividends toward guiding our quarterback room.

"As a former quarterback at Notre Dame, Tom also has a rare ability to truly relate with the quarterbacks on our roster. He's literally sat in their seat, dealt with the ups and downs, faced the criticism, deflected the praise, and all that comes with playing the position at Notre Dame. He can genuinely mentor them — not only on the football field, but in the classroom and the community as well."

Rees effectively became a player/coach in 2012, when a July arrest for resisting law enforcement and illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor led to a one-game suspension that knocked him out of what was a four-person competition to be the team's starting quarterback. Everett Golson ultimately emerged from that fray, but Rees was a fixture as both a mentor to and a replacement for the redshirt freshman as the Irish rolled to the BCS Championship with an undefeated regular season record. 

Consider what Rees said about his relationship with Golson prior to the 2013 BCS Championship:

"There'd be a couple late night discussions," Rees said. "He'd ask me what I thought he needed to improve on, you know, don't hold anything back. And I told him the truth sometimes -- I told him the truth all the time, sometimes it wasn't what he wanted to hear. But any way I could help, and I've had a lot of fun working with him."

Rees' playing time that year was important, yet sporadic. So during the week and from the sidelines, he took more of a coach's point of view with the Irish offense, which teammates said was beneficial when he took over the starting job again in 2013 follow Golson's academic suspension. 

"Not being a stating quarterback, it's sort of pushed him to become more of a leader and more of a coach," former offensive lineman Chris Watt said before the 2013 season. "I think that helped him see the game a little bit differently than before." 

Rees will be primarily tasked with grooming redshirt sophomore Brandon Wimbush, a guy who some around the program thought was the most talented quarterback on Notre Dame's roster the last few years. Of course, Wimbush's offensive knowledge wasn't near the level possessed by Malik Zaire or DeShone Kizer, but his throwing and running ability are both mouth-watering traits that Rees will have a chance to mold.

That Rees is getting his coaching start in his mid-20's isn't particularly surprising. In many ways, has always been on track for this role, and maybe more (think offensive coordinator).

"When I finished my playing career and graduated from Notre Dame, I wanted to do two things," Rees said Tuesday. "First, I wanted to coach, and second, at some point in my career I hoped to get an opportunity to return and do it at my alma mater. I didn't know when or if this opportunity might present itself, but I'm so grateful and honored that it did. I'm ready to get things rolling with this great staff and group of student-athletes."