Boston Red Sox

Look away, White Sox fans: Chris Sale makes history

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USA TODAY

Look away, White Sox fans: Chris Sale makes history

This one may sting a bit, White Sox fans.  

On Wednesday evening, former White Sox ace Chris Sale accomplished a feat that no other American League pitcher has since 1999. The current Red Sox left-hander whiffed his 300th batter of the season, becoming the first A.L. hurler since Pedro Martinez to do so. 

Sale reached the impressive milestone in a dominant eight-inning, 13-strikeout gem. Vintage. 

Overall on the season, he's posted a 2.75 ERA with opponents hitting a mere .203 against him. Before his postseason debut in October, Sale has a shot at leading two franchises in season strikeout totals: 

The consolation on the South Side is that the prized prospect acquired in the Sale blockbuster had a pretty nice night himself. Yoan Moncada drilled a two-run blast in Houston, his seventh since being called up from Triple-A Charlotte on July 19. 

The great trade debate wages on. 

Joe Maddon’s reaction to Red Sox getting caught cheating with Apple Watch

Joe Maddon’s reaction to Red Sox getting caught cheating with Apple Watch

PITTSBURGH – Joe Maddon’s eyes lit up when a reporter mentioned the breaking New York Times story that exposed a Major League Baseball investigation into the Boston Red Sox electronically stealing signs from the New York Yankees, making the Apple Watch a new weapon in their heated rivalry.

“I just heard,” the Cubs manager said near the end of his media briefing before Tuesday night’s 4-3 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park. “I’m wearing a Fitbit. I still think it has the same espionage capabilities as the Apple Watch...if in fact you wanted to turn in that direction.

“A lot going on there, man, a lot going on. Oh my God, it’s pretty impressive to be able to get all that done in that short amount of time.”

Maddon knows how the Red Sox are wired after managing nine seasons in the American League East and leading the upstart Tampa Bay Rays into Fenway Park. The New York Times report detailed the complaint Yankees general manager Brian Cashman filed with the commissioner’s office and a system where a Red Sox training staffer would check his Apple Watch in the dugout and relay messages to players.

“You can still do the old-fashioned way,” Maddon said, “just by doing it because they’re not hiding their signs properly. They have a good relay system between second and the hitter – I’m all for that. And if somebody steals our signs, that’s our fault, absolutely. 

“But the camera shooting in, and whistles from the dugout, that kind of stuff, I’m not into. I don’t think that’s right.”

The New York Times reported the Red Sox responded by filing a complaint accusing the Yankees of using their YES Network to try to steal signs and gain a competitive edge – and claiming their own manager (John Farrell) and president of baseball operations (Dave Dombrowski) were unaware of the sign-stealing scheme in the Boston dugout.  

“There’s been a lot of different ballparks (with) an urban legend behind each one,” Maddon said. “One ballpark in the American League, we used to roll our signs all the time. Not just runner on second base, runner on first base, whatever – always rolling your signs. We were concerned about it.”

Was that ballpark located not too far from Wrigley Field?

“Not far,” Maddon said. “Not far.”

It would be naïve to think this is just limited to Red Sox-Yankees bitterness. This is the new reality for a multibillion-dollar industry obsessed with technology and saturated with Big Data.

“There’s always been this concern,” Maddon said. “Light bulbs, lights, cameras, guys standing up, sitting down, towels in bullpens. All kinds of goodies.

“I’ve had other friend coaches who would text or call me (when) they had been adamantly sure about different things – chicanery – going on in these different spots.

“So like I said, your best method is to conceal your signs. Don’t just be so blatantly simple. Do something a little bit different. (Maybe) you give up one sign and then all of a sudden you do the exact opposite intentionally.”

Cubs hoping Leonys Martin can have Dave Roberts-like impact down the stretch

Cubs hoping Leonys Martin can have Dave Roberts-like impact down the stretch

While the baseball world was focused on Justin Verlander relocating to Houston, the Cubs went out and got themselves a 2017 version of Dave Roberts.

Theo Epstein's front office acquired outfielder Leonys Martin from the Seattle Mariners Thursday before the waiver trade deadline expired.

It was an under-the-radar move, but Cubs GM Jed Hoyer admitted they were thinking along the lines of Roberts in 2004, when the Boston Red Sox went out and acquired the speedy outfielder who wound up stealing one of the most important bases in baseball history against the New York Yankees as part of the ALCS comeback.

Martin is a similar mold — a guy who has speed (114 career stolen bases in the big leagues) and can play exceptional defense all around the outfield.

For more recent examples, think 2015 when the Cubs acquired Quintin Berry for a pinch-running role and Austin Jackson (who also came from the Mariners in an August waiver deal) as outfield depth. 

Berry wound up stealing two bases for the Cubs in eight regular season games, but did not appear in the postseason. Jackson played 29 games in the final month of the 2015 regular season before seeing action in five playoff contests.

"Joe [Maddon] always asks us for a guy that could steal a base, that could play outfield defense in September and hopefully we can play well enough to play in October," Hoyer said. "Martin provides that — good baserunner, good basestealer, good outfield defender. 

"I don't love the 40-man rules in September, but if we're gonna play by these rules, having a guy that can pinch-run late in a game and steal a base or is more likely to score from second on a hit or something like that, it is really valuable.

"Our roster has a lot of strengths and that's not one of them this year. So he fills a hole that we have."

Martin has been around a little while, playing his entire career in the AL West prior to his first game in Chicago Saturday. He was a top prospect coming through the Texas Rangers system around the same time as Pedro Strop, ranking as high as No. 79 by Baseball America prior to 2012.

The 29-year-old played in 143 games for the Mariners last year, hitting 15 homers and stealing 24 bases with a .684 OPS. He's been a stellar defender over his career, with 47 Defensive Runs Saved in seven years, including 5 in 2017 while playing only 30 games (15 games in center field, 15 in right).

Martin said he was slightly surprised by the trade to the Cubs and has talked to Maddon and Co. about his role and expectations prior to his first game at Wrigley Field Saturday.

"He said be ready for anything and I will be," Martin said.

Martin made a lasting impression with the Cubs late last summer when he lined a double to left-center at Wrigley Field off newly-acquired Chicago closer Aroldis Chapman. The Cubs were leading 1-0 at the time, but Martin drove in two runs and wound up scoring a third off Chapman's wild pitch as the Mariners went on to win 4-1.

"The thought process there was to get speed off the bench and the ancillary beneift there is the fact that he's very good on defense and he's got a great arm," Maddon said. "Seeing him back in the day with the Rangers when I was with the Rays, he hurt us in the playoffs and the latter part of the season.

"Last year, he had that bullet in the left-centerfield gap off Chappy when he first showed up. There's some solid ability there and a lot of energy, which I kind of like. I think he fits perfectly."