Philadelphia Eagles

Could Mitch Trubisky have already shown the Bears he’s ready to start?

Could Mitch Trubisky have already shown the Bears he’s ready to start?

Could the Bears have already seen something in Mitch Trubisky that gives the front office and coaching staff a reason to believe he can start right away?

The short answer: It doesn’t sound like that’s happened yet from everything that’s been said publicly in Bourbonnais, Chicago and Lake Forest. But the longer answer, and a reason to ask this question, involves what happened with the Philadelphia Eagles a year ago.

Last year’s No. 2 pick didn’t show much, statistically, in his first (and only) preseason game. But Carson Wentz still was the Eagles’ starting quarterback in Week 1 of the 2016 season.

Wentz completed 12 of 24 passes for 89 yards with no touchdowns and one interception in his NFL preseason debut last August, and also suffered a hairline rib fracture in that game that kept him out of the final three weeks of preseason play. All that added up doesn’t exactly scream “Week 1 rookie starter.”

But through practices and workouts over the course of August, the Eagles came to believe they could trust Wentz with the starting job, ultimately shipping Sam Bradford to the Minnesota Vikings in an early September blockbuster.

The Eagles, as it turned out, saw something in Wentz that may not have shown up on his preseason stat line. Trubisky, on the other hand, had an outstanding preseason debut.

Trubisky showed last week he’s more than capable of making all the throws expected out of an NFL quarterback — his third-and-long completion to Deonte Thompson stands out — and put his pure talent on display throughout his two-plus quarters of play. Teammates complimented how Trubisky commanded the huddle, though his plays were coming off a call sheet he was able to study before the game.

The Bears (and Trubisky) have framed his excellent showing against the Denver Broncos as a small step in the right direction, with still plenty on which the North Carolina product can improve. Once again, Trubisky will be the third Bears quarterback to take the field Saturday night against the Arizona Cardinals.

Consider how the Eagles opened training camp last year: Bradford was the No. 1, a veteran (Chase Daniel) was No. 2 and the rookie (Wentz) was No. 3. Sounds familiar, right? Then consider what coach Doug Pederson said about Wentz as training camp began:

“You want (Wentz) to be in a position where if there’s an injury or somebody goes down, you plug him in and you don’t have any worries,” Pederson said. “You’re fully confident in his ability to take over. Because backup quarterbacks need to be ready to go in an instant.”

The Bears’ brass hasn’t said anything along those lines regarding Trubisky, at least not yet. But there has been a scenario — albeit, not one completely congruous to what the Bears have, given the draft picks involved — where a No. 2 pick convinces a coaching staff and front office that he’s ready to start instead of a more experienced veteran. And it was seemingly based on a lot less than what we saw from Trubisky last week.

Fantasy Football Fix Podcast: Sleepers, busts and what to do with Ezekiel Elliott

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Fantasy Football Fix Podcast: Sleepers, busts and what to do with Ezekiel Elliott

Slavko Bekovic, Scott Krinch, Glynn Morgan and Tony Andracki break down decisions on suspended running back Ezekiel Elliott and where he should be going in drafts, whether this affects his keeper status and more.

Plus, the CSN Fantasy crew gives their sleepers and busts, including Rob Gronkowski. Leonard Fournette, Kenny Golladay and why LeGarrette Blount is actually on both lists.

Check out the entire podcast here:

The Rotoworld 2017 Fantasy Football Draft Guide provides tiers, projections, ADP reports, mock drafts for many different types of leagues, Sleepers and Busts and much more. Get the NFL Draft Guide now.

Bears release veteran wide receiver Eddie Royal, waive three others

Bears release veteran wide receiver Eddie Royal, waive three others

The Bears offseason, already among the NFL’s busiest, spun again on Thursday with roster trims that included wide receiver Eddie Royal and defensive lineman Will Sutton, two players that finished 2016 on injured reserve but had figured prominently into personnel and rotation packages over the past two seasons.

Also waived were offensive lineman Cornelius Edison and fullback Paul Lasike.

Royal was a high-profile signing in the first offseason under GM Ryan Pace and coach John Fox, agreeing to a three-year deal with $10 million guaranteed with the plan for him to be a slot receiver complementing Alshon Jeffery and Kevin White. But with a succession of injuries, Royal played in just nine games in each of the past two seasons, finishing with 33 catches last season and 37 in 2015, and a total of just 3 TD receptions, plus a punt returned for a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles last season.

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His contract contained no more guaranteed money for this season. The Bears’ signings of Rueben Randle, Markus Wheaton and Kendall Wright, the anticipated return of White from a broken leg, and the emergence of Cameron Meredith created a crowd on the depth chart ahead of Royal, who turns 31 this month.

Sutton was a third-round pick in 2014 under then-GM Phil Emery, projected as a 4-3 interior pass rusher out of Arizona State. He earned a spot in the 3-4 schemes under coordinator Vic Fangio and line coach Jay Rodgers, and started six games last season as an undersized nose tackle before going down for the year with an ankle injury against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

The offseason additions of Jaye Howard from the Kansas City Chiefs and John Jenkins from the Seattle Seahawks added needed size to the defensive line, which also has Jonathan Bullard, Eddie Goldman, Akiem Hicks and Mitch Unrein in the mix for front-line playing time.