Juan Pierre felt 'a little bit a part' of last year's World Series team

Juan Pierre felt 'a little bit a part' of last year's World Series team

Among the many making their first Wrigley Field pilgrimage on Saturday was Juan Pierre. 

The former MLB outfielder donned a Cubs jersey for 162 games in 2006, but he had never been to the Friendly Confines as a fan. 

"I had to ask my wife how you even get into the stadium. I didn't even know what entrance to take or any of that," Pierre joked with Kelly Crull during the Cubs' 3-2 win over the Cardinals. "But it's a great experience." 

Pierre was a fan favorite on the North Side, swiping 58 bases in his lone season with the club. He finished his career 18th on the all-time steals list, tallying 614 with six clubs.

His 2006 Cubs squad was short on success, though. Despite having the seventh highest payroll in baseball, the team lost 96 games, ultimately leading to the firing of Dusty Baker. 

Even so, Pierre, like so many other former Cubs, felt connected to the 2016 team. 

"When they won it last year, I felt a little bit a part of it," Pierre said. "I didn't have much to do with it, but I always tell everybody, 'anybody who ever put that uniform on, they wanted to be the one who did it.'"

Pierre was excited to see Anthony Rizzo, who has a home near the former outfielder in Parkland, Florida, and other members of the team that broke the curse in his return to Chicago. But Wrigleyville isn't the only side of town he's familiar with.

Pierre played two seasons with the White Sox, giving him a unique perspective on the upcoming Crosstown series. 

"You throw the records out. You throw everything out," he said. "The fans really got into it. As players we're like, 'OK this is another game we gotta win,' but the fans were crazy. What I realized was the Cubs don't like the White Sox. The White Sox fans hate the Cubs fans."  

Freak of nature: Kris Bryant wows again with insane healing ability

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USA TODAY

Freak of nature: Kris Bryant wows again with insane healing ability

For the second time in the last month, the reigning MVP has avoided serious injury and returned ahead of schedule.

Kris Bryant continues to impress everybody with his magical healing abilities.

He is in the lineup for Saturday's game against the St. Louis Cardinals after injuring a finger on his left hand while diving into third base during the first inning of Wednesday's game in Atlanta. Bryant was immediately removed from that game, had the off-day Thursday, was held out Friday and expected to be sitting again for the second game of this Cubs-Cardinals series.

But that's not the case. Bryant is once again hitting second and playing third base after missing only 17.5 innings with a finger issue that looked awfully scary when it initially occured.

Bryant also rolled his ankle when he stepped awkwardly on third base in Washington at the end of last month, but returned ahead of schedule then, too.

When discovering Bryant was returning to the lineup so soon, one Cubs staffer shook his head and described the superstar as a freak of nature.

"Some good supplements right there, man," Joe Maddon said. "That's that good fish oil. Yeah, it's nice that he came back so quickly. It happened with the ankle, too.

"I talked to him on the bench [Friday] and we just decided to wait 'til today to decide whether or not he can play or not. Texted [Cubs trainer PJ Mainville] this morning as I was doing the lineup. I sent a preliminary lineup [Friday night] possibly with him and then all of a sudden, he's fine.

"He took some BP in the cage. Of course, it's still a little bit sore — it's not 100 percent — but he's ready to go, so we put him out there."

The Cubs need Bryant in the lineup as often as possible right now as they attempt to claw their back into first place following a subpar first half. The Cardinals have also righted the ship as of late and the Cubs need every win they can muster up against National League Central foes right now.

But of course, the Cubs also want to be playing into November again this seasoon and absolutely need Bryant healthy and producing.

So how do they manage the desire to play him now while also looking out for his well-being two or three months down the line?

"There's a difference between pain and soreness," Maddon said. "If a guy's actually in pain, you don't want him to play. If he describes it as being sore, then it's OK to go ahead and play him.

"So it's more of a soreness as opposed to a pain, so in those circumstances, it's up to the player himself. Of course, we want him out there and we would not put him at risk. At the end of the day, the conversation between him and the trainer and then what I can glean of it, you try to make your best decision.

"But for me, the player has to understand the difference between pain and soreness. Soreness plays."

Joe Maddon has not seen anything like these recent implosions from Cubs pitching staff

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AP

Joe Maddon has not seen anything like these recent implosions from Cubs pitching staff

Joe Maddon has not seen anything like these single-inning implosions lately.

At least not at the major-league level.

For the third time in the last five Wrigley Field contest, the Cubs pitching staff has allowed at least seven runs in an inning.

This time, it was nine runs before the first out was recorded in the eighth inning of Friday's 11-4 Cardinals victory.

The Cubs actually entered the inning clinging to a 3-2 lead and had their best setup guy — Carl Edwards Jr. — slated to pitch against the top of the Cardinals order.

But after taking out his teammate with a foul ball, Matt Carpenter began the wacky inning with a double off Edwards and the rout was on.

"We had a bad inning pitching," Maddon said after the game. "That's the third time in a week here at this ballpark, if you go back prior to the break. It's a seven, a nine and a 10 in an inning. 

"I've not seen that since rookie ball. That's crazy stuff. I'm saying it straight up: We played good baseball today. We just pitched badly for one inning. Some really good pitchers had a tough time.

"...That's kind of a strange day. We played well and lost because we gave up nine runs in an inning, which is really awkward to watch from the dugout."

Thirty-eight minutes after Edwards threw the first pitch of the inning, the Cubs finally retired the Cardinals and were looking up at an 11-3 score. 

Neither Edwards nor Hector Rondon recorded an out and they combined with Justin Grimm to allow six hits, six walks and nine runs.

Here's how it all went down:

That's the second straight Wrigley Field game that has featured at least nine runs in an inning but a Cubs opponent. Ace Jon Lester surrendered 10 runs in the first inning to the Pittsburgh Pirates on the day before the All-Star Break began.

And the day before that series began, Mike Montgomery and the Cubs gave up seven runs to the Milwaukee Brewers in a rain make-up game at the "Friendly Confines."

"You see it every now and again. Not often," said Jake Arrieta, Friday's starting pitcher who was in line for a win before that wild eighth inning. "You stick around this game long enough and you see some crazy things happen. And really, that was the turning point in the game. 

"A couple guys had a pretty rare outing in the 8th there. You won't see that rarely ever or ever again from those two guys. Just a tough one."

Rondon, who had entered the game having allowed just two runs in his last 13 innings, could do nothing but shake his head in trying to explain it after the game.

"That was a weird, weird inning," Rondon said. "First time I've seen something like that — nine runs with no outs. But it is what it is. They got us today and we'll see tomorrow."

Maddon has seen control issues with his bullpen all year, but still has confidence in the unit as a whole. He knows not to overreact to one game.

However, Maddon did point to the first game coming out of the All-Star Break where Montgomery and the Cubs bullpen squandered an 8-0 lead before Addison Russell's heroics to break the tie for good late in that contest.

"The bullpen has been fabulous," Maddon said. "Twice since the break, they just had tough games."

Rondon and the Cubs relievers won't overreact, either.

A year ago at this time, Rondon was the Cubs' closer and they hadn't yet traded for Aroldis Chapman. So no, one outing won't get him down. 

"Right now, I'm pissed and whatever," he said, "but tomorrow, I'll come in with a different mentality and try to win the game."