Thunder's Maynor, back from ACL injury, has advice for Rose

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Thunder's Maynor, back from ACL injury, has advice for Rose

Another Bulls preseason game, another young point guard that, like Derrick Rose, is recovering from an ACL surgery. Actually, Oklahoma City backup Eric Maynora starter in place of All-Star Russell Westbrook in Tuesdays contest; Westbrook and NBA scoring champion Kevin Durant each logged a DNP-CD, so Thunder head coach Scott Brooks could evaluate the rest of his rosteris technically recovered from his knee injury after missing almost all of last season.

Maynor, who was quietly regarded as one of the leagues top second-stringers at his position, suffered his torn ligament on Jan. 7 of last season against the Houston Rockets in the Thunders ninth game of the campaign. He became a forgotten man to many, as Oklahoma City made it to the NBA Finals, with veteran Derek Fisher filling in for him, but although he wasnt playing, Maynor was never out of the loop.

It was tough from the start of it because Ive never been hurt before, but I carried on and started getting better, day by day. I had to push myself every day to get back to where I wanted to be, explained Maynor, who is probably best known for hitting a dramatic shot to upset Duke when he played at pre-Final Four VCU. It was tough at first, getting back out there, even working out. Just not knowing if I could get the step back that I had and all the moves, the quickness.

I was away from the team for a little bit, then I couldnt stand it because I was at home, not doing anything, so then I started traveling with the team and I traveled for the rest of the year, he continued. That was really better because sometimes youll be at home and youre sitting there by yourself, just bored and thinking too much. When I got with my teammates, they were able to push me every day, whether we were at home or on the road.

Chimed in Brooks: Well, we kept him involved quite a bit. As soon as he was able to travel, he was traveling with us. He was at every shootaround, every meeting, every film session, and I had myself and the assistant coaches always talk to him.

I always had him tell me about the game, give me kind of like a verbal scouting report of what he thought of the game, what he thought of the players, what he thought we could have done better and I also had him give me a few plays to draw up. I used a few of them; they didnt work too well, but he would come back the next game and try to give me some more, he added. Hes a thinking mans player. Hes a point guard that loves the game, hes cerebral. Thats how he has success in this league. Hes not going to blow by you and dunk over you. What hes going to do is hes going to outsmart you and hes done a great job with that.

While Maynor is a different player than Rose, he has advice from his own experience that could apply to the Bulls superstar.

With me, it took time and everybody that Ive talked to that had the injury, you could say this and say that, but its different when you get out there and start going up and down, especially against the best players in the world. I think its different with me because I was never speed, speed, speed, speed. Its like Im back to where I was, but D-Rose, hes fast all the time, so hes going to have to work to get that back, but I know hes going to keep working and hell be straight, said Maynor, who added that he hasnt been in contact with either Rose or Minnesota point guard Ricky Rubio, another young floor general working through the same injury. Theres going to be good days, theres going to be bad days, but you just have to keep working throughout all of it.

Thats the thing: You dont want to rush anything, so I would advise both of those guys to make sure youre ready to come back, he went on to say. Now I feel good playing.

Brooks said that only last month was he positive that Maynor was back to his old self, but since then, hes been just as confident in the savvy point guard as he was in the past,

Hes done a great job with his rehab, with our medical team and hes put the time in. I knew he was back in September, when he started to play pickup games, he explained. The next step was to play five-on-five. Once I saw that, I knew that it was just getting some of the rust off his game and thats moving along pretty good.

You have to fight through every day. You cant take days off, you cant get down on yourself or down on the situation. You have to continue to fight with a good, positive attitude and thats what Eric has done, and from what I understand, thats what Derrick is doing also. It comes back. Eric hasnt lost any of his quickness or strength. I never had an ACL injury, but thats probably one of the things as an athlete, you fear youre not going to be the same. But you will be the same with the work that you put in, with the type of care that players have. You will be the same, if not better.

Durant, friends with Rose since they won a gold medal in the 2010 FIBA World Championships, also shared his opinion.

I havent talked to him, but people that I know him, I just told them that I know hes going to get back stronger and better. Ive been praying for him, of course. Ive been watching the videos online, so Im sure hes going to have a really nice comeback year for the Bulls and be at full strength, he said. I think hell be better with all that weight training hes been doing to strengthen his body and his core. Hes doing everything that he needs to do.

Thunder reserve DeAndre Ligginsa Chicago native who attended Washington High School and lost to Rose in the 2007 city title gameexpressed a similar sentiment.

I know hes a competitive guy and hes trying to get back as quickly as he can. Hes a humble dude and a great ballplayer. I just hope he gets back well and continues to be great in the NBA, he told CSNChicago.com. Derricks going to be back pretty quickly because I know how hard hes trying to get back and I know his rehab is very aggressive, so I know hes a competitive guy and he wants to get back to prove himself again.

Fire lose Open Cup epic in Cincinnati after penalties

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AP

Fire lose Open Cup epic in Cincinnati after penalties

CINCINNATI —

A crowd of 32,287 in Cincinnati waited and waited and waited some more, but finally got what they wanted.

The host FC Cincinnati downed the Chicago Fire in penalty kicks after 120 minutes of goalless soccer.

It was all about the goalkeepers before penalty kicks with the Fire’s Matt Lampson and Cincinnati’s Mitch Hildebrandt combining for 17 saves. Hildebrandt improved on his crazy good night by denying Nemanja Nikolic, Arturo Alvarez and Juninho. Bastian Schweinsteiger was the only Fire player to convert a penalty in four rounds. Cincinnati missed its first penalty, but finished the next three.

In regulation, the Fire huffed and puffed in the first half, but didn’t really create much danger in front of Cincinnati’s goal. At halftime, the Fire had 78 percent of the possession, but couldn’t manage a shot on target.

Cincinnati’s game plan to defend deep and counter was stifling the Fire’s attack. The Fire only managed shots from outside the box that all missed the target. Matt Polster had an open shot in the box following a corner kick, but it was deflected wide by a sliding defender.

The home crowd of 32,287, which is the second biggest crowd in U.S. Open Cup history, didn’t have much to cheer in the first half, but Matt Lampson made the only save of the half when he came off his line to deny Danni Konig who got free down the left side.

Both the atmosphere and the game livened up in the second half. Both teams had multiple quality chances and both keepers, Lampson and Cincinnati’s Mitch Hildebrandt came up with big saves.

Lampson saved the game to deny a breakaway for Jimmy McLaughlin in added time just before regulation ended.

In extra time, Cincinnati thought it had the go-ahead goal from Andrew Wiedeman in the 110th minute, but it was called back for a close offside call. Hildebrandt and Lampson both came up with huge saves in the final minute of extra time to send the match to penalties.

Bears Talk Podcast: Breaking down camp competition at wide receiver

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Bears Talk Podcast: Breaking down camp competition at wide receiver

On this week’s Bears Talk Podcast, we hear from Markus Wheaton as Chris Boden and JJ Stankevitz discuss the training camp competition at slot receiver.

Boden and Stankevitz also weigh in on PFF ranking the Bears’ starting lineup 18th in the NFL, answer listener questions and add another layer of Aaron Rodgers envy.

Listen to the latest Bears Talk Podcast right here: