Why police won't keep investigating Suh car crash

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Why police won't keep investigating Suh car crash

From Comcast SportsNet
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Portland police have no plans to further investigate a car accident involving Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh after two women claimed they suffered injuries in the wreck. The two women, who were not identified in a police report, came forward a day after the early Saturday morning accident to say they had been injured. The police report was amended to include the claims. Suh, who went to Grant High School in Portland and later played for Nebraska, is currently serving a two-game NFL-imposed suspension for stomping on Green Bay Packers guard Evan Dietrich-Smith during a Thanksgiving Day game. He is not allowed to take part in team activities while on suspension. Suh had returned to Portland from the Pac-12 championship game in Eugene when the accident occurred at 1:14 a.m. on Saturday. In the police report, Suh said he lost control of his 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle when he tried to go around a parked taxi and crashed into a light pole, a water fountain and a tree. Suh called 911 to report the accident and police at the scene said he was cooperative and did not appear to be intoxicated or show any other sign of impairment. No one at the scene reported any injuries in the crash, which drew a large number of spectators from a nearby nightclub. No citation was issued in the accident. One of the women was quoted in the amended police report as stating that speed caused the accident. "He was driving too fast and reckless all the time," the report quoted the woman as saying. "There was never a taxi. He was just going too fast and he could have killed someone at Dante's (nightclub)." The women, who say they were among four people in the car, said they left the scene because of the crowd the accident was attracting. The husband of one of the women picked the two up, the report states. The man took his wife to the hospital to be treated for a laceration on her forehead, a black eye, a "busted lip" and a sore shoulder, according to the police report. The other passenger did not seek treatment for a sore shoulder until the next morning, it said. The more seriously injured of the two said she had told Suh at the scene that she was hurt and needed a doctor, the police report said. In the 911 call, Suh said there were no injuries. The report states that the officer who arrived on the scene two minutes after the 911 call did not observe any victims in the area. Two other officers who arrived shortly thereafter also did not see anyone who required medical attention, and no witnesses reported any victims or said that Suh was driving recklessly. The women spoke to KGW-TV in Portland and recounted their version of the events, although they asked that their identities be withheld for privacy reasons. The more seriously injured woman showed KGW the stitches above her eyebrow and her swollen lips. Attempts by The Associated Press to reach the two women for comment on Tuesday were unsuccessful. Suh has not responded to repeated requests for interviews about his suspension and the accident. Portland police Sgt. Pete Simpson said that because the crash did not involve an intoxicated driver, traumatic injuries or vulnerable road users, it does not meet the department's investigation criteria. The 2010 Defensive Rookie of the Year, Suh has three sacks this season among five tackles for losses. He has been credited with 31 tackles and eight quarterback hits. When Suh played at Nebraska he pleaded guilty to negligent driving and paid a 60 fine after crashing into three parked cars. Suh, driving his mother's SUV, said he had swerved to avoid a cat. He also paid 48 in court costs and was disciplined by Huskers coach Bo Pelini. He was drafted by the Lions with the second overall pick in the 2010 NFL Draft. Suh has endorsement deals with Chrysler, Subway and Nike, among other companies.

Michigan's magical March ends in one-point loss to Oregon in Sweet Sixteen

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USA TODAY

Michigan's magical March ends in one-point loss to Oregon in Sweet Sixteen

Michigan's March magic finally ran out.

The guy who's been so fantastic throughout his senior season, point guard Derrick Walton Jr., missed a game-winning 3-point try at the buzzer, and the Wolverines fell to the Oregon Ducks by a 69-68 final score in the Sweet Sixteen.

It was an incredibly competitive game between the Big Ten Tournament champs and the Pac-12 regular-season champs, with neither side ever leading by more than six.

But Moe Wagner, who scored a career-high 26 points in Michigan's second-round win over Louisville, was pretty much a non-factor in this one, scoring just seven points on 3-for-10 shooting.

Still, seniors Walton and Zak Irvin kept an unusually cold-shooting group of Wolverines alive with a combined 39 points, 23 of which came after halftime. D.J. Wilson also scored in double figures with 12, all coming on 3-pointers.

But Michigan, which had been on fire offensively for much of the last month, shot just 43.1 percent from the field and missed 20 of its 31 shots from behind the arc.

The Wolverines actually shot under 40 percent over the opening 20 minutes as the two defenses did good work for these typically high-scoring squads. Michigan turned the ball over seven times before the break but trailed by just two as it went to the locker room.

The tit-for-tat nature of the game continued at the outset of the second half before Oregon reached its game-high six-point lead, but Michigan responded with seven straight and grabbed its first lead of the second half around the 11-minute mark. The Ducks answered that mini surge with six straight of their own, part of a larger 10-4 spurt, before Wilson and Walton hit back-to-back triples to once again give the Wolverines a narrow advantage, this time with a little more than four minutes remaining.

Oregon and Irvin traded buckets from there, and a Walton jumper was Michigan's sixth straight make from the field, putting the Wolverines up three with under two minutes to play. But Michigan didn't score again, and Jordan Bell and Tyler Dorsey got back-to-back layups, the latter the game-winning one ahead of Walton's missed 3-point attempt as time ran out.

Dorsey was fantastic for the Ducks, scoring 20 points, his sixth straight game with at least 20 points. Bell had a double-double with 16 points and 13 rebounds. Oregon advanced to its second straight Elite Eight with the win.

Michigan's entertaining end-of-season run is over. Entering Thursday night's game in Kansas City, the Wolverines had won seven straight and 10 of their last 12. Those two losses came by a combined seven points. Add this loss in and just eight points separated Michigan from 13 consecutive wins.

Certainly this group of Wolverines will be remembered for its sensational four wins in four days at the Big Ten Tournament after that horrifying aborted takeoff, as well as for reaching the third Sweet Sixteen in the last five seasons under John Beilein.

Cubs president Theo Epstein, world's greatest leader? 'The pope didn't have as good of a year'

Cubs president Theo Epstein, world's greatest leader? 'The pope didn't have as good of a year'

MESA, Ariz. – Cubs president Theo Epstein showed zero interest in playing along with Fortune magazine putting him on the cover and ranking him No. 1 on the list of "The World's 50 Greatest Leaders," or two spots ahead of Pope Francis.

"The pope didn't have as good of a year," manager Joe Maddon said Wednesday, channeling Babe Ruth.

Epstein essentially bit his tongue, responding to reporters with a copy-and-paste text message that reflected his self-awareness and PR savvy. 

"Um, I can't even get my dog to stop peeing in the house," Epstein wrote. "The whole thing is patently ridiculous. It's baseball – a pastime involving a lot of chance. If (Ben) Zobrist's ball is three inches farther off the line, I'm on the hot seat for a failed five-year plan. 

"And I'm not even the best leader in our organization; our players are."

Epstein obviously has a big ego. No one becomes the youngest general manager in baseball history and builds three World Series winners without a strong sense of confidence and conviction. But he genuinely tries to deflect credit, keep a relatively low profile and stay focused on the big picture. 

Fortune's cover art became an older image of Epstein standing at the dugout, surrounded by reporters during a Wrigley Field press gaggle. (This was not Alex Rodriguez kissing a mirror during a magazine photo shoot.) The text borrowed from Tom Verducci's upcoming "The Cubs Way" book. 
 
Fortune still hit an Internet sweet spot and generated a lot of buzz, ranking Epstein ahead of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (No. 4), Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster (No. 7) and German Chancellor Angela Merkel (No. 10).

"I'm all about the pope," Maddon said. "Sorry, Pope Francis. We're buds. I'd like to meet him someday. But after all, what we did last year was pretty special. 

"Has the pope broken any 108-year-old curses lately?"

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Epstein also ended an 86-year drought for the Boston Red Sox, putting the finishing touches on the immortal 2004 team and winning another championship in 2007 with eight homegrown players. 

No matter how the Cubs try to airbrush history now, that five-year plan featured lucky breaks, unexpected twists and turns and payroll frustrations as the franchise went from 101 losses in 2012 to 103 wins last season. But even after the biggest party Chicago has ever seen, no team in baseball is better positioned for the future. And there is no doubt that Epstein is a Hall of Fame executive.  

"He's very good at setting something up and then permitting people to do their jobs," Maddon said. "That's the essence of good leadership, the ability to delegate well. But then he also has the tough conversations. 

"He sees both sides. I've talked about his empathy before. I think that sets him apart from a lot of the young groups that are leading Major League Baseball teams right now. You know if you have to talk to him about something, he's got an open ear and he's going to listen to what you say. He's not going to go in there predetermined. 

"You can keep going on and on, him just obviously being very bright, brilliant actually. He's got so many great qualities about him. But he leads well, I think, primarily because of his empathy."

That blend of scouting and analytics, open-minded nature and pure guts led to the Cubs: drafting Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber; trading for Anthony Rizzo, Kyle Hendricks, Jake Arrieta, Addison Russell and almost their entire bullpen; and signing transformative free agents like Jon Lester and Zobrist.            

Chairman Tom Ricketts locked up Epstein before the playoffs started last October with a five-year extension believed to be worth in the neighborhood of $50 million. Arrieta didn't laugh off the Fortune rankings.

"It just shows you all the positive that's he done," Arrieta said. "Not only here, but beforehand in Boston and what he's built for himself and for the city of Boston and the city of Chicago. It's hard to understate what he means to the organization."