Why police won't keep investigating Suh car crash

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Why police won't keep investigating Suh car crash

From Comcast SportsNet
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Portland police have no plans to further investigate a car accident involving Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh after two women claimed they suffered injuries in the wreck. The two women, who were not identified in a police report, came forward a day after the early Saturday morning accident to say they had been injured. The police report was amended to include the claims. Suh, who went to Grant High School in Portland and later played for Nebraska, is currently serving a two-game NFL-imposed suspension for stomping on Green Bay Packers guard Evan Dietrich-Smith during a Thanksgiving Day game. He is not allowed to take part in team activities while on suspension. Suh had returned to Portland from the Pac-12 championship game in Eugene when the accident occurred at 1:14 a.m. on Saturday. In the police report, Suh said he lost control of his 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle when he tried to go around a parked taxi and crashed into a light pole, a water fountain and a tree. Suh called 911 to report the accident and police at the scene said he was cooperative and did not appear to be intoxicated or show any other sign of impairment. No one at the scene reported any injuries in the crash, which drew a large number of spectators from a nearby nightclub. No citation was issued in the accident. One of the women was quoted in the amended police report as stating that speed caused the accident. "He was driving too fast and reckless all the time," the report quoted the woman as saying. "There was never a taxi. He was just going too fast and he could have killed someone at Dante's (nightclub)." The women, who say they were among four people in the car, said they left the scene because of the crowd the accident was attracting. The husband of one of the women picked the two up, the report states. The man took his wife to the hospital to be treated for a laceration on her forehead, a black eye, a "busted lip" and a sore shoulder, according to the police report. The other passenger did not seek treatment for a sore shoulder until the next morning, it said. The more seriously injured of the two said she had told Suh at the scene that she was hurt and needed a doctor, the police report said. In the 911 call, Suh said there were no injuries. The report states that the officer who arrived on the scene two minutes after the 911 call did not observe any victims in the area. Two other officers who arrived shortly thereafter also did not see anyone who required medical attention, and no witnesses reported any victims or said that Suh was driving recklessly. The women spoke to KGW-TV in Portland and recounted their version of the events, although they asked that their identities be withheld for privacy reasons. The more seriously injured woman showed KGW the stitches above her eyebrow and her swollen lips. Attempts by The Associated Press to reach the two women for comment on Tuesday were unsuccessful. Suh has not responded to repeated requests for interviews about his suspension and the accident. Portland police Sgt. Pete Simpson said that because the crash did not involve an intoxicated driver, traumatic injuries or vulnerable road users, it does not meet the department's investigation criteria. The 2010 Defensive Rookie of the Year, Suh has three sacks this season among five tackles for losses. He has been credited with 31 tackles and eight quarterback hits. When Suh played at Nebraska he pleaded guilty to negligent driving and paid a 60 fine after crashing into three parked cars. Suh, driving his mother's SUV, said he had swerved to avoid a cat. He also paid 48 in court costs and was disciplined by Huskers coach Bo Pelini. He was drafted by the Lions with the second overall pick in the 2010 NFL Draft. Suh has endorsement deals with Chrysler, Subway and Nike, among other companies.

From ‘When It Happens’ to ‘Where It Happens,’ Cubs mining next generation of talent

From ‘When It Happens’ to ‘Where It Happens,’ Cubs mining next generation of talent

MESA, Ariz. – The Cubs turned Theo Epstein’s “Baseball is Better” speech from his first Wrigley Field press conference into a marketing pitch that might distract fans for a moment from an awful big-league product.          

The 2017 “That’s Cub” ad campaign actually uses what started organically years ago within the farm system, two words that recognized a great at-bat or a heads-up play or a defensive stop.    

Business vs. baseball is no longer the dominant storyline it had been during the early phases of the Wrigleyvile rebuild. Business and baseball are booming for what’s become Major League Baseball’s version of the Golden State Warriors.

It’s just interesting that a franchise valued at north of $2 billion has found so much inspiration on the back fields of this spring-training complex, where staffers you wouldn’t recognize get to work before dawn and players you’ve never heard of dream about their big break.

It’s not just drafting Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber. And trading for Anthony Rizzo, Jake Arrieta, Kyle Hendricks and Addison Russell. And hiring a manager obsessed with T-shirts. Baseball operations became a marketing department, selling prospects to Cub fans, the Chicago media and the gurus putting together the rankings – and trying to get buy-in from players who all think they belong in The Show.

Minor-league field coordinator Tim Cossins gets credit for “When It Happens,” a theme that didn’t simply revolve around 1908 and the championship drought. Jason McLeod, the senior vice president who oversees scouting and player development, suggested pairing the W flag with that phrase, and it became this ubiquitous idea around the team.   

“We tied everything into it,” McLeod said Sunday at Sloan Park. “When that time comes, when it happens, can you lay the bunt down? When it happens, can you execute a pitch? Can you go in and pinch-run, steal the base when the time comes?

“The big ‘When It Happens’ is when we win, of course, but for us in (player development), it was about everything that we’re going to be asked to do in that moment: Are you going to be ready when it happens?”

Now what? The defending World Series champs are going with: “Where It Happens.”

A bullet point from Epstein’s bio in this year’s media guide references how his first three first-round draft picks with the Cubs “combined to set up the go-ahead run in the top of the 10th inning of Game 7 of the 2016 World Series when Schwarber singled and (Albert) Almora pinch-ran, moved to second on Bryant’s deep fly to center, and scored on Ben Zobrist’s double.”

“We’re never going to forget about the importance of young players,” Epstein said. “There’s definitely a lot of talented, interesting prospects still in the system and sometimes they get a little overshadowed because of the star young players we have at the big-league level and how quickly some of those guys moved through the system. But there’s a lot of talent there.

“We’re going to lean on young players beyond our prospects, not just in trades, but also to provide organizational depth and also to serve as the next generation, the next infusion of talent at the appropriate time.

“But it’s a process. There’s going to be a lot of ups and downs in development for all these guys. And we have a ton of faith in our player development operation to help these guys along the way.”

So Ian Happ will start the season one phone call away at Triple-A Iowa and see if some combination of injuries and his switch-hitting skills and defensive versatility gets him to the North Side at some point. Or used as a trade chip for pitching, the way third baseman Jeimer Candelario and catcher Victor Caratini appear to be blocked.

Joe Maddon already compared Eloy Jimenez – who can’t legally buy a beer in Wrigleyville yet – to a young Miguel Cabrera or Edgar Martinez. The Cubs are practically begging for someone like Eddie Butler to pitch his way into the 2018 rotation.

By Monday morning, when the full squad reconvenes after a weekend trip to Las Vegas, the Cubs could start making cuts and shaping their Opening Night roster. But the Cubs are going to need so much more than the 25 players who will be introduced next Sunday at Busch Stadium. Maddon used 26 pitchers and 149 different lineups last season. This is “Where It Happens.”

“If this particular group of youngsters were in a different organization that had a greater need right now, you’d probably hear a lot more about these guys,” Maddon said. “But the fact that they’re stuck behind a Bryant and a Russell and a Javy (Baez) and a Rizzo and a (Willson) Contreras and a Schwarber, et cetera, et cetera, it becomes more difficult to really push or project upon these guys.

“But I think these young guys have gone about their business really well. If it’s bothering them or if they’re concerned about that, they’re not showing that. I think they’ve put their best foot forward.”

Honda Road Ahead: Bulls continue playoff push against Cavaliers, Hawks

Honda Road Ahead: Bulls continue playoff push against Cavaliers, Hawks

Mark Schanowski, Kendall Gill and Will Perdue break down the Bulls' upcoming schedule in the latest edition of the Bulls Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland and NW Indiana Honda dealers.

TNT Bulls are back this week as the team heads into a crucial stretch. 

Currently, the Bulls sit half a game back of the Miami Heat for the eighth spot in the Eastern Conference playoff race, and with just eight games remaining on the schedule, each contest is essentially a must-win. 

So, yes, Thursday would be a great time for Jimmy Butler and company to summon their TNT alter ego. The Bulls have sealed 18 straight victories when playing on TNT Thursday, an improbable feat considering those games are usually reserved for two of the NBA's best. 

To continue that run, they'll have to down Lebron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, who are also fighting for playoff positioning -- albeit at the top of the conference. Good thing the Bulls have a tendency to get up for big games. 

"The Bulls play up and down to their competition," Bulls Pregame and Postgame analyst Kendall Gill said. "They've been doing that the whole season." 

After Cleveland, the Bulls get set to battle another playoff squad, the Atlanta Hawks. 

Watch the video above to see Schanowski, Gill and Perdue break down the matchups.