Word on the Street: Peavy relieved, disturbed

Word on the Street: Peavy relieved, disturbed

Wednesday, April 20, 2011
CSNChicago.com

Peavy disturbed by latest pain

After learning that he experienced only discomfort from scar tissue stemming from his surgery to repair a detached latissimus dorsi muscle nine months ago, Chicago White Sox pitcher Jake Peavy felt an array of emotions.

"I guess it was good news, but personally disappointing for me," Peavy told reporters Wednesday in the visitor's clubhouse at Tropicana Field. "I felt I wasnt far away and was feeling so good. To feel something close to what I felt before I blew it out at the repair site (below the right shoulder) was a disturbing thing." (chicagosports.com)

Korver wants another shot at Barkley

The Bulls guard wants another chance after being caught off guard when asking TNT analyst Charles Barkley a question for their "Ask Charles" segment during Game 2.

I had to do it on the spot, Korver said Wednesday. That was the first thing that came to my mind. If I had more time to think about it, I was going to say: Ive heard you were a 6-foot-4 power forward. If thats the case, that makes you the same height as, like, Keith Bogans. So my question to you, Charles, is: If I saw you and Keith Bogans walking down the street, who would be taller?

Barkley was listed at 6-6 but said hes 6-4 . Thats about three inches shorter than Korver, who rarely ventures into the lane. (chicagobreakingsports.com)

Blackhawks fans abuse Canucks executives?

A change to the seating arrangements in the United Center for the playoffs led to the Vancouver management contingent being seated right above some of the more rabid fans in the cheap seats, and not surprisingly once the Hawks got up in the game they became quite bellicose.

And they did so using the most foul language one might imagine.

By the time your agent arrived, fully four rows of people largely dressed in Blackhawk jerseys were turned around and hurling abuse largely directed at Mike Gillis and Laurence Gilman, but everyone else seated in the box as well, including Stan Smyl and Lorne Henning.

We took it for a couple of periods before somebody got fed up and said, 'Why don't you shut up and go back to your mother's basement?' and of course that really got them going, said Gilman. It's pretty tiring hearing that over a long night. (theprovince.com)

Northwestern vs. Stanford

The Wildcats announced they will open a four-game football series with the Stanford Cardinal in 2019. The first game will be played in Evanston, then Northwestern travels to Palo Alto the following year. The two last met in 19994 when they played to a 41-41 tie. (washingtonpost.com)

NIU linebacker leaves hospital after being shot

Northern Illinois linebacker Devon Butler, who was shot in the upper back two weeks ago, was released from the hospital where he had been since April 6 to begin his recovery from the gunshot wound. His condition was serious or critical much of that time.

Any timetable for his return, if he can ever come back, remains unkown. Nobodys focusing on football with him right now, head coach Dave Doeren said. Two weeks ago, we didnt know if he was going to live. The big thing for him right now is not rushing him." (sportingnews.com)

The big-picture reasoning behind Rick Renteria and bunting

The big-picture reasoning behind Rick Renteria and bunting

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Rick Renteria wants his players to be able to execute a bunt regardless of how much it drives White Sox fans crazy.

The White Sox manager wants to win now, but he’s also looking at the big picture.

Even though he knows how much a team’s chance of scoring decreases when an out is surrendered via the sacrifice bunt, Renteria is using the opportunity to see what abilities his players have. He wants to know what they can do.

Renteria is well aware that his calls for sacrifice bunts aren’t popular with fans (see: Twitter’s reaction to Yoan Moncada’s bunt tries on Saturday). But he also thinks there’s no better time to work on bunts than during a game. So as much fury as it brings, Renteria will continue to ask his players to work on a skill he’d like to see remain part of the game.

“Listen, (Moncada’s) a plus runner,” Renteria said. “He’s going to be able to use that as a part of his arsenal. I see a whole lot of home run hitters dropping bunts right now against shifts and things of that nature. I don’t think that art should disappear. We’re in the era of quote-unquote the long ball, but like I’ve said, sometimes you need to do certain things to kind of put your club in a better position.

"If you think that’s one of the things that’s available to you, you use it. I don’t think you’re necessarily giving it up in terms of an out, because when you’ve got guys who can run anything is possible. You end up loading the bases possibly. I know our guys are very cognizant of just playing the game. If they feel like they want to get two guys in scoring position on their own, they do it. It’s not something I want to take away from them. I think they read the defenses. Sometimes we talk about other ways of dealing with the defenses, but I think they’re understanding that we’re going to want that to be a part of all their abilities.”

As for the team’s execution, Renteria isn’t satisfied with the results. That means you can expect to see more bunts the rest of the way.

“It’s still a work-in-progress,” Renteria said. “I think that would be a falsehood to say we’re at the point where I go, I’m very, very happy with the way we lay down bunts. It’s still a work-in-progress, something that we’re going to continue to emphasize. Something we’re going to continue to work on. And then again, the only opportunities you get in real time are games, and that’s when you need ‘em.”

White Sox manager Rick Renteria 'surprised' Melky Cabrera hasn't been traded

White Sox manager Rick Renteria 'surprised' Melky Cabrera hasn't been traded

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The White Sox have offloaded more pieces in the past eight months than that furniture store that always seems to be going out of business.

Everything. Must. Go.

Even so, the team hasn’t found any takers for veteran outfielder Melky Cabrera, who finished with four hits in Saturday night’s 7-2 White Sox loss to the Kansas City Royals. Cabrera finished a triple shy of the cycle and drove in two runs. That Cabrera still resides on the South Side is a surprise to White Sox manager Rick Renteria.

“Honestly yeah, to be honest,” Renteria said. “To me he’s a premier Major League baseball player who has been playing outstanding defense. And he has been for us one of the two or three guys who has been timing his hitting in terms of driving in runs when we need them, putting together really good at-bats when we need them. Just playing the game. Yeah, kind of surprised.”

Despite making their intentions known that everyone short of Tim Anderson and Carlos Rodon are available, Cabrera’s name has barely registered a blip on the radar when it comes to trade rumors.

Several factors have probably prevented Cabrera from being dealt, the biggest being his salary. Cabrera is still owed roughly $6.3 million of his $15 million salary, which makes him an expensive option.

Defensive metrics also don’t have much love for Cabrera despite his eight outfield assists. Cabrera’s lack of range has produced minus-6 Defensive Runs Saved and a minus-4.7 Ultimate Zone Rating.

Those figures likely would like have teams lean toward making Cabrera a designated hitter. While he’s been one of the team’s most consistent and prominent offensive performers, Cabrera’s .786 ranks only about 38th in the American League.

As FanRag’s Jon Heyman noted earlier Saturday, to trade Cabrera the White Sox would likely have to eat most of the outfielder’s remaining salary.