Word on the Street: Sandberg to Philly?

Word on the Street: Sandberg to Philly?

Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010
CSNChicago.com

Sandberg to Philly?

After striking out in his quest to become the Cubs next manager, Hall of Fame second baseman Ryne Sandberg may be returning to the triple-A level to manage; but not here. The Daily Herald reports that both the Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies have openings at the triple-A level. Sandberg refused to discuss which teams have contacted him, but said that there are a number of major and minor league teams are interested.

Additionally, MLB.com is reporting that the Phillies are interested in Sandberg for their vacant managerial spot with the triple-A Lehigh Valley Iron Pigs (The Daily Herald, MLB.com)

NHL All-Star captains pick rosters

Changes to the all-star game will be announced in the next couple of days. The NHL and the players association have been kicking around ideas to try and make the game fun. It appears they will still have fans vote for the top six starters, then put together a master list of players to fill out the roster and have the captains make the selections. Beyond that, they want to find a way to make the game more competitive, but still fun.The idea of a coach's challenge to have a missed call on the ice reviewed one-time in a game was presented by former Blackhawks and current Florida GM Dale Tallon, but was quickly dismissed. (cbc.ca)
Former Bull Quintin Dailey dead at 49

Former Chicago Bull Quintin Dailey died on Monday in Las Vegas. He was 49. Dailey died in his sleep at his home, according to the Las Vegas Journal Review. A cause of death has not been confirmed.

Dailey, who remains the all-time single-season scoring leader in Bay Area Division I history, was also one of the reasons why USF stunned the sports world by shutting down its basketball program.

Dailey had a tumultuous 10-year NBA career after being drafted No. 7 overall by the Chicago Bulls in 1982. Dailey averaged 14.1 points per game during his pro career, but had off-court troubles that included violating the NBA's drug policy twice for cocaine use. (mercurynews.com)

Polamalu: NFL needs a committee for fines

Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu said Tuesday morning that the NFL needs to create a committee to deal with fining players for illegal hits. The current system, he says, is flawed and unfair.

The other problem is that when I appeal a fine, or anybody appeals a fine, we appeal it to the same person who gave you the fine." said Polamalu during his appearance on the Dan Patrick Show. "So its like a police officer pulling you over for speeding and you telling him I didnt speed; you get the fine, you know?" (CSNChicago.com)

Stafford out for the season?

Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford, who has been plagued by injuries throughout his short NFL career, may be out for the season after separating his shoulder in the Lions' 23-20 overtime loss to the New York Jets on Sunday. Stafford underwent and MRI on Monday and will seek a second opinion, but preliminary tests reportedly show a "Grade 3" separation.

"I've got to talk some more with these doctors and kind of figure out what they're thinking,'' Stafford said Monday evening on a Detroit radio program. "It's kind of frustrating to be coming back and, two games later, be knocked out again. We'll take it day by day and figure out what the plan is.'' (Mlive.com)
Packers' Collins fined for hit

Green Bay Packers safety Nick Collins was fined 50,000 by the NFL on Monday for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Roy Williams on Sunday. The league said that Collins "violently and unnecessarily struck a defenseless receiver" and that the hit was a "flagrant violation of player safety rules."

Despite what the NFL thinks, though, Williams doesn't think there was anything wrong with the hit. "Commissioner Goodell, don't fine the guy," Williams said after the game on Sunday. "It wasn't that bad of a deal, he shouldn't get fined. It was a football play, a football player making a football play. No injury, no harm." (ChicagoBreakingSports)

Scott Boras fires back at Jake Arrieta’s critics and makes another Max Scherzer comparison

Scott Boras fires back at Jake Arrieta’s critics and makes another Max Scherzer comparison

LOS ANGELES – Scott Boras waved a Cubs beat writer over toward the VIP section behind home plate at Dodger Stadium. Holding a smartphone in hand, the super-agent started rattling off data points on Saturday afternoon, making the case for Jake Arrieta once he hits the free-agent market after this season.

Boras pushed back on the idea that Arrieta is something less than an elite pitcher and compromised by diminished velocity, launching into a defense that lasted roughly 15 minutes and drew in two more Chicago reporters before a security guard told the media to clear the field because it was an hour before first pitch.

Once again, Boras used 2014 Max Scherzer as a reference point, detailing five of six starts between May 21 and June 17 in which a Cy Young Award winner gave up seven runs, five runs, four runs, four runs and 10 runs. That didn’t stop Scherzer from making another All-Star team, going 18-5 with a 3.15 ERA, leading the Tigers to another division title and jumping to the Nationals for a seven-year, $210 million megadeal.

“I just remember going through this,” Boras said, “because when Detroit came to town, I got the ‘Oh my God, the ship is sinking.'"

The night before, Boras sat in a front-row seat with his entourage watching Arrieta during a 4-0 loss that saw aging Dodgers Chase Utley and Adrian Gonzalez crush fastballs over the center-field wall. One theory – floated by the media and essentially confirmed by manager Joe Maddon – is that Arrieta (4.92 ERA) will have to learn how to pitch in a new reality where he can’t automatically unleash a 95-mph fastball.

“That is so far remote from the truth,” Boras said. “To create a voice to your fan base to suggest that Jake is not Jake – Jake is throwing at frankly better levels than what Scherzer did. And the reality of it is that Jake has this history.

“He’s got a great history that goes on, like (Clayton) Kershaw does, like (David) Price does, like (Zack) Greinke does. These guys have not done this for one year. He did it ’14, ’15, ’16.”

Here’s how Brooks Baseball’s online database has tracked Arrieta’s average velocities across the last three-plus seasons:

2014

Four-seam: 94.59

Sinker: 94.49

2015

Four-seam: 94.93

Sinker: 95.21

2016

Four-seam: 94.32

Sinker: 94.44

2017

Four-seam: 92.64

Sinker: 92.50

Here’s the Brooks Baseball analysis of Scherzer’s fastball from 2012 through last season’s Cy Young Award campaign: 94.97, 94.46, 93.88, 94.67, 95.23.

[MORE: Scott Boras doesn't believe Jake Arrieta is feeling pressure of free agency]

Boras dismissed a question about Arrieta’s inconsistencies at the beginning of his career as he shuttled between the Orioles and their Triple-A affiliate and how that could impact the perception of a 30-something pitcher.

“I’m looking at a three-year window coming into ’17,” Boras said. “When you’re elite, you have not done it once. You have not done it twice. You’ve done it three times. Jake has had three premium years. He’s in the Cy Young voting three years in a row. That puts him in a class of all these people.

“(One) comment is: ‘Oh my God, he’s dropped in velocity.’ Fair observation. My point is they all drop in velocity. All the elite pitchers drop in velocity, because they come in the league, they’re throwing 96, they’re throwing 95, then they’re down. But what are they all doing? They’re all (within) the ranges, probably close to 92 and 93.5.”

The Boras Corp. pitch to owners and executives this offseason will also revolve around durability, advanced stats and postseason experience. Arrieta has made 25, 33 and 31 starts across the last three seasons, ranking second in the majors in WHIP (0.97) and third in soft-contact percentage (22.6) and pitching in six playoffs rounds.

Where Kershaw and Price have repeatedly had to answer questions about their big-game performances, Arrieta can cue up the highlights from the 2015 wild-card game in Pittsburgh and show off his 2016 World Series ring.

Boras clearly has an agenda, but all this is worth remembering amid all the instant analysis and overreactions to how the defending champs are playing now. It might also reinforce why Theo Epstein’s front office could view this as a bad investment and keep rolling the dice with change-of-scenery guys and trading from their surplus of hitters. 

“We’re going to sit here and evaluate a player on a 60-day moment or a 10-start moment when he has three years of his history?” Boras said. “Don’t do it. That’s not fair. It’s not an evaluation, because all their velocities drop.

“All these guys are all still doing well and all their velocities dropped. The key thing is they were able to do what they did three years running. What does Jake have an advantage over all of them at? What does Jake do better than anybody? He wins big games.”    

After getting shut down by Buck Farmer, White Sox ninth-inning rally falls short

After getting shut down by Buck Farmer, White Sox ninth-inning rally falls short

The White Sox offense waited just a little too long to come to life in the second game of Saturday’s doubleheader.

The bats were silent for eight innings before a jolt of a ninth-inning rally that saw the South Siders shave a 4-0 gap down to 4-3, only for back-to-back strikeouts to strand the would-be tying run 90 feet away and send the White Sox to a 4-3 loss at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Buck Farmer made his first big league start of the 2017 season for the visiting Detroit Tigers, and he kept the White Sox quiet, striking out 11 hitters in his 6.1 shutout innings of work. He allowed just three hits and two walks, preventing the White Sox from doing much of anything.

“Farmer certainly had a lot of action on his pitches,” White Sox manager Rick Renteria said, “so it was tough to get anything started while he was in there.

“Farmer kept us from being able to string things together. His ball had a lot of action. He hid the ball well. … He was able to contain and continue to throw strikes and move the ball out of the zone.”

It wasn’t until the ninth that the White Sox were able to string some things together. Jose Abreu led off the final frame with a double and moved to third two batters later when Matt Davidson singled. Tim Anderson’s base hit up the middle brought home Abreu to end the shutout. Then Yolmer Sanchez tripled into the right-field corner to plate both Davidson and Anderson and make it a sudden one-run game.

But Todd Frazier and Adam Engel struck out, leaving Sanchez standing at third base.

[WHITE SOX TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

White Sox starting pitcher Derek Holland had a solid outing, allowing just one run and striking out eight batters in six innings of work. He did allow seven hits and four walks, but he worked out of most jams, the only run coming on a solo home run off the bat of John Hicks in the fourth inning.

The Tigers’ offense did the rest of its damage against the White Sox bullpen, a change from Game 1 of the doubleheader, which saw the relief corps throw four scoreless innings in a 3-0 win. But in Game 2, Gregory Infante allowed two seventh-inning runs on a sacrifice fly and a Michael Ynoa wild pitch after Infante departed. Victor Martinez smacked a solo homer off Juan Minaya to give the Tigers a 4-0 lead in the top of the ninth.

It’s been a long couple days on the South Side. Friday’s scheduled day-night doubleheader turned into a lot of waiting around and just one game that didn’t get started until after a rain delay. Then came Saturday’s straight doubleheader, two games played one right after the other.

While Holland dismissed any fatigue for the White Sox — who before these long days at home came off a 10-game road trip — but whether related to fatigue or not, these two teams struck out a combined 47 times and stranded a combined 35 runners in Saturday’s two games.

That being said, the White Sox had enough left in them to come 90 feet away from erasing a four-run deficit in the ninth.

“Look how we battled into the ninth inning,” Holland said. “We were still going strong. Definitely no fatigue over here, that’s for sure.

“This was a tough one today. We had two back-to-back games and long games. They played hard. That’s what it’s all about. Those guys were battling out there.”