The best...and worst of Kenny Williams

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The best...and worst of Kenny Williams

Yesterday the White Sox made the move official: Kenny Williams has been promoted to White Sox executive vice president. A better day couldn't be picked to take a look back at Willams' tenure as general manager, as yesterday marked the seven-year anniversary of his crowning achievement. October 26th, 2005 saw the White Sox on the field at Minute Maid Park in Houston, beating the Astros 1-0 to complete a sweep in the only White Sox World Series Championship since 1917.
Let's take a look, in terms of WAR (Wins Above Replacement; a metric showing the value of a player in comparison to a fringe Major League player) at Williams' best and worst moves during his run as general manager.
1.) December 23, 2006 (16.2 WAR): Sox send Brandon McCarthy and minor leaguer David Paisano to the Rangers in exchange for John Danks, Nick Masset & minor leaguer Jacob Rasner.
McCarthy was impressive in his first season in the Bigs, working as a spot starter for the 2005 World Champs. With the addition of Javier Vazquez in 2006, McCarthy spent his sophomore season in the bullpen, save for two starts. The lanky right-hander was highly regarded, and the move came as a bit of a surprise, as the deal of Freddy Garcia to the Phillies less than three weeks earlier created talk of a possible spot in the 2007 rotation.
Nevertheless, the prospect of bringing in John Danks, the Rangers 1st Round draft pick in 2003 (9th overall) was too much to resist. And it paid off magnificently. Danks got his first taste of the Majors in a rough 2007 season, and his 6-13 record and 5.50 ERA were more or less on par with the performance of the team as a whole. But the next three seasons, he posted double figures in wins, boasting an aggregate ERA of 125 (meaning, when adjusting for the ballpark, the league ERA was 25 higher than his) forming, with Mark Buehrle, a potent tandem of southpaws. Danks has since struggled due to hard luck and more recent injuries, but hopefully hell come back healthy and justify the five-year, 65 million investment made in the 2011 offseason.
However, even if Danks never throws another pitch in a White Sox uniform, Kenny Williams fleeced the Rangers in this deal. McCarthy compiled 1.5 WAR through three mediocre seasons in Texas before resurrecting his career with the Athletics after signing a free agent deal in December, 2010. Danks is at 18.1 and counting.
2.) December 6, 2006 (15.8 WAR): Freddy Garcia sent to Philadelphia for Gavin Floyd and Gio Gonzalez.
Knowing what you know about Gio Gonzalez, keep in mind that his contribution to the White Sox in this deal was 0.0 WAR, granted that he never threw a pitch for Kennys crew. And still, the Sox come out ahead nearly sixteen WAR ahead of the Phillies. Garcia made only 11 starts in a Phillies uniform, eventually needing shoulder surgery, and when he did pitch, he was very ineffective no matter how you cut it up (5.90 ERA, 5.38 FIP, 5.83 FRA).
As frustrating as Gavin Floyd has been, hes also been (at least up until this season) durable. He has made 29 or more starts for the last five seasons; ERA hovering at league average or better (much better in 2008). Heres a quintessential Gavin Floyd statistic: in 2012, he led the White Sox in scoreless starts of 6 IP (6; as many as Chris Sale & Jake Peavy combined). He also tied Philip Humber for the most starts with 5 ER allowed (7). Thats Gavin. But he racks up innings; his 948.1 IP over the last 5 seasons is 8th most in the American League over that span. Thats important. And with that comes 15.5 WAR since being acquired by the Sox, while Garcia had -0.3 before walking and signing a free agent deal with the Tigers late in 2008.
3.) March 20, 2006 (11.2 WAR): Matt Thornton acquired from Mariners in exchange for Joe Borchard
The White Sox used the 12th overall selection in the 2000 June draft to nab Stanfords Joe Borchard. Three picks later, Chase Utley was taken out of UCLA. Five years later, he had a .596 career OPS in 102 career games in the Majors. At the time, the deal was seen as a swap of disappointing prospects. Thats where the roads separated. Borchard continued to struggle, hitting .215 in his remaining two Major League seasons with the Mariners and Marlins (finally calling it quits after bouncing around the Braves & Giants Minor League systems), while Thornton became a valuable part of the White Sox bullpen.
The dart-throwing lefty has made at least 60 appearances out of the bullpen for the White Sox in each of his seven seasons on the South Side, racking up nearly 10 strikeouts per 9 innings (9.6) over that span. He even earned an All-Star nod in 2010, when he posted an excellent percentage of inherited runners allowed (13). While he hasnt been quite the same since (including a very brief, very unsuccessful stint as closer to start 2011), he has been solid more often than not, and has long outlasted the player he was traded for, and that is a successful trade.
4.) July 31, 2004 (9.8 WAR): Esteban Loaiza traded to the Yankees in exchange for Jose Contreras and cash.
Cash itself has a magnificent WAR in my book. But for the purposes of this occasion, its not factored in. Esteban Loaiza had a 69-73 record with 4.88 ERA (95 ERA) on his resume when he came to Chicago and provided the South Side faithful with a 2003 to remember. He tied Fernando Valenzuelas record of 21 wins in a season by a Mexican-born pitcher, and should have had more; two of his losses were 1-0, he had a 2-1 no decision loss, and two starts (one loss, one no decision) where the Sox lost 3-2. He had a 2.90 ERA and led the AL in strikeouts. The next season the magic was gone, and Kenny Williams shipped his 9-5 record and 4.86 ERA to the Bronx for the once highly-regarded Cuban import Jose Contreras, who himself sported a 5.64 ERA.
It was the classic challenge trade. Loaiza wasnt much use to the Yankees (1-2, 8.50 ERA, decent relief work in the playoffs), and Contreras wasnt that great either to finish 2004. But 2005 alone makes this trade one of Kennys best. Contreras went 11-2 with a 2.96 ERA in the second half, earning the Game 1 start in the ALDS, ALCS & World Series. He continued his success in 2006, running a consecutive win streak to 17. He faltered in 2007 and beyond, but he was so good on two 90-win White Sox teams, that the edge in WAR ends up much in favor of Contreras (8.7 to -1.1).
Now for the bad; the two worst involve a common player:
1.)January 3, 2008 (-11.5): Nick Swisher acquired from Athletics for Ryan Sweeney, Gio Gonzalez & Fautino De Los Santos
2.) November 13, 2008 (-10.9): Nick Swisher traded to Yankees with Kanekoa Texeira for Wilson Betemit, Jeff Marquez, & Jhonny Nunez
Nick Swisher had seven seasons where he averaged about 2.7 WAR per season with about a .365 OBP. Stuck right in the middle of that stretch is his 2008 season with the White Sox, where he hit a career-low .219 with a career-low .743 OPS. The plan was to have Swisher, a player with good patience and good pop hit leadoff; something the White Sox hadnt had in a long time. He hit 35 HR in a tough environment in Oakland in 2006, and his OBP peaked at .381 in 2007.
After 30 games though, the plan was abandoned. Batting .208 with just three home runs (but a good .351 OBP), he was hitting primarily seventh through the remainder of the season. It was too bad, because it was a good idea having an unconventional leadoff man, with OBP as the focus rather than speed, and they may have given up on it a bit soon.
In any event, Ryan Sweeney, Gio Gonzalez & Fautino De Los Santos were shipped to the Bay Area in January 2008. In a late season call-up in 2006 and some games in May 2007, he didnt show the solid .290 BA he showed in the minors, but Sweeney found it with the As (although with an anemic 110.4 ABHR). Sweeney alone out-values Swisher in this deal (5.3 WAR for Oakland to -0.5 for Chicago).
The bigger name is Gonzalez. The right-hander broke out in 2010 with a 15-9 season striking out 171 in just over 200 innings and was even better in 2011, although walks were a concern both seasons. He was good for 5.8 WAR in Oakland alone. Prior to the 2012 season, the Athletics flipped Gonzalez to the Nationals in a package deal which netted them Tommy Milone (2.0 WAR) and Derek Norris (0.6 WAR) among others (and they won the AL West).
The second Swisher deal could be considered even worse. All three players the Sox received appeared in a combined 28 games...and were worth -0.8 WAR, even in that short a time period. Wilson Betemit didnt hit, and made four errors in eight chances at third base. Jeff Marquez gave up two runs in his only inning with the Sox, and Mr. Nunezs main accomplishment was to become the second Jhonny in Major League history. To add insult to injury, Swisher returned to form with two straight seasons of 29 HR and 120 OPS in the Big Apple. Hes at 10.1 WAR and counting while its been well over two years since a player from that deal played for the White Sox.
3.) July 18, 2004 (-6.8 WAR): Carl Everett acquired from Expos for Gary Majewski & Jon Rauch
The WAR number looks worse than this deal really was. Carl Everett was the primary starting DH for a World Series team (albeit for just one season) and the relievers (more so Rauch than Majewski) simply benefited from lasting a few seasons longer with the ExposNationals (Everett -0.3 WAR in 04-05; Majewski 1.9 WAR in 2004-06, Rauch 5.2 WAR in 2004-08).
4.) December 13, 2001 (-6.7 WAR): Todd Ritchie and Lee Evans acquired from Pirates for Josh Fogg, Kip Wells & Sean Lowe
Eight pitchers have logged 120 innings with an ERA of over 6.00. Todd Ritchie is the most recent, doing it in his sole season on the South Side (6.06 ERA in 133.2 IP in 2002). He had a 3.32 ERA through his first nine starts, then embarked upon a stretch of 12 starts in which he allowed 6 earned runs seven times (in one of the other five, he allowed eight runs all unearned). He had 15 losses on August 3rd. Etc. Etc. By the end of the season, he had contributed -1.9 WAR.
That same 2002 season, Kip Wells & Josh Fogg tied for the Pirates team lead with 12 wins and both pitched over 190.0 innings. Wells and Fogg both had their moments where they racked up 170 IP on bad Pirates teams. But innings have value, and positive WAR resulted.
Kip Wells actually made some starts with the Padres in 2012. In contrast, the last Major League batter Todd Ritchie faced was Bobby Higginson. You could look it up.
Its a fact that a lot of his better deals were made after they had already won the World Series. But thats the point. Its a constant stream of smaller deals that made Kenny Williams run as White Sox general manager great. Getting Freddy Garcia from Seattle, bringing in Kevin Youkilis for next to nothing, acquiring Carlos Quentin from Arizona...even flipping Aaron Miles to Colorado for Juan Uribe. Not to mention the shrewd free agent signings. All things said, it is clear that Kenny Williams rise to Executive VP is well-deserved as the good trades clearly outweigh the bad.
WAR calculations are from the incomparable baseball-reference.com, where I spend as much time as I do breathing.

Preview: White Sox host Cubs in Crosstown Classic tonight on CSN

Preview: White Sox host Cubs in Crosstown Classic tonight on CSN

The White Sox take on the Cubs in the Crosstown Classic tonight, and you can catch all the action on Comcast SportsNet. Coverage begins with an hour-long White Sox Pregame Live at 6:00 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Tonight's starting pitching matchup: Miguel Gonzalez (2-5, 4.41 ERA) vs. Jake Arrieta (12-4, 2.60 ERA)

White Sox HR leaders Cubs HR leaders
Todd Frazier (28) Kris Bryant (25)
Brett Lawrie (12) Anthony Rizzo (24)
Jose Abreu (11) Ben Zobrist (13)

Looking Ahead:

Date White Sox Cubs
Tuesday James Shields (4-12, 4.99 ERA) Kyle Hendricks (9-6, 2.27 ERA)
Wednesday Jacob Turner (0-1, 14.73 ER Jason Hammel (9-5, 3.35 ERA)
Thursday TBD TBD

MORE:

Chuck Garfien and Bill Melton on the impact of the Crosstown Classic

David Kaplan and Todd Hollandsworth give Cubs analysis for Crosstown Classic

Top Crosstown Moment: Blackhawks celebrate Cup with Cubs-Sox

Crosstown Classic: Look inside the Wrigley Field scoreboard

Todd Frazier on Crosstown Classic: 'I heard it gets a little crazy'

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.

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Bears mix of QB Jay Cutler with OC Dowell Loggains still a critical work in progress

Bears mix of QB Jay Cutler with OC Dowell Loggains still a critical work in progress

Back in January, before the Bears promoted Dowell Loggains from quarterbacks coach to offensive coordinator, CSNChicago.com took an advance look at Loggains and how he might fit with Jay Cutler were the Bears to make Loggains yet another in the long list of coordinators for Cutler. With the start of training camp at hand, a longer look at this pivotal coach-player situation comes into focus.

No change made by the Bears this offseason carries the weight of the one moving Dowell Loggains to offensive coordinator to replaced departed Adam Gase. Quarterback Jay Cutler is coming off the best statistical season of his career, founded on the ball-security foundation instilled by Gase and Loggains. The Gase-to-Loggains succession plan projects to catapult Cutler, and with him the offense, to a next level.

Not necessarily.

For now, as they were when Mike Martz, Aaron Kromer and others took the Chicago O.C. job, all the right things are being said:

From Loggains on Cutler’s improvement under Gase and himself: “I don’t think Adam or I should take the credit,” Loggains said. “I think Jay made the choice to improve and work on the things that we asked him to work on. And I hope that process continues.”

From Cutler: “I’ve known Dowell like I’ve known Adam, for a long time… . The backbone of this offense is still the same. Even if Adam was here I think we still would have changed some stuff and got better in certain areas. So we’re just kind of continuing down that road.”

But Cutler having a positive relationship with an incoming coach means…nothing.

Indeed, his history is not encouraging, even with coaches he ostensibly thought highly of coming in, even ones already on staff or had worked with him previously.

Mike Tice was promoted from offensive line coach to coordinator when Mike Martz was fired after the 2011 season, Cutler’s previous best for avoiding interceptions. Tice had been instrumental in balancing the offense in 2010 when Martz’s schemes and protections were getting Cutler annihilated.

But by mid-2012, Cutler’s relationship and communications with Tice had deteriorated to the point of backup Josh McCown needing to serve as go-between.

Notably, the 2012 friction was developing even as the Bears were on their way to a 10-6 season, and with Jeremy Bates having been hired as quarterbacks coach. That was based in part on Bates’ relationships with Cutler from a 2006-08 overlapping stint with the Denver Broncos. Cutler’s relationship with Tice was toxic, and Bates went down along with Tice and the rest of Lovie Smith’s staff after that season.

The Bears have added Dave Ragone, a member of the Tennessee Titans staff with Loggains and having played two NFL games in 2003. But the Bears’ offense will turn on the Cutler-Loggains axis and it relationship elements, both football and inter-personal.

“There’s definitely some honesty there,” Cutler said, smiling. “He’s not afraid to tell me when I’m completely wrong and rightfully so. I like to tell him whenever I think we’re not doing things right or we need to change things.

“I think at the core of that we kind of cut through some stuff and we get things done a little bit quicker… .No one’s really sensitive. We just try to get it done.”

When Gase talked, Cutler listened. Will Cutler’s receptors stay open when something goes wrong, as something invariably will sometime in an NFL season? That is on Cutler, and his openness to yet another coordinator was at the root of his improvement to a career-best passer rating of 92.3.

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Loggains has been notably vocal during open practices, with more than Cutler alone. That is a departure from Gase’s demeanor, although Gase was more than capable of tough love when anyone on his side of the football needed it.

“I think it’s a mutual respect,” Loggains said of his Cutler relationship. “I think I respect him and he respects me. I think that when you have that mutual respect then all dialogue is legal. So whatever I say to him, he knows where it’s coming from and vice versa.”

Cred issues?

Some questions hanging over Loggains have less to do with Loggains himself, but rather his background.

Gase came to the Bears from two years as offensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos under John Fox. Gase, quarterbacks coach for the preceding two seasons, moved into that job when Mike McCoy was hired to coach the San Diego Chargers.

The Denver gig included three seasons working with Peyton Manning. While Manning needed scant coaching at that point in his career, the point was less how much Gase coached Manning as much as what Gase brought with him from his time with Manning. Gase knew from up close what a Hall of Fame quarterback looked like.

Loggains’ NFL career stops have accorded him time with no one approaching Manning’s stature. Not surprisingly, in time with three different teams, Loggains has not been involved with an offense that ranked in the top half of the league:

Year Team Job Offense results
2015 Bears QB 21st ydg, 21st pass, 23rd pts.
2014 Browns QB 27th pass, 27th pts.
2013 Titans O.C. 21st ydg, 21st pass, 19th pts.
2012 Titans QB/O.C. 26th ydg, 22nd pass, 23rd pts.
2011 Titans QB 17th ydg, 15th pass, 21st pts.

The Tennessee Titans’ quarterbacks during Loggains’ years there were Ryan Fitzpatrick, Matt Hasselbeck and Jake Locker. The 2014 Browns put up the seventh-highest passing yardage in franchise history, with Brian Hoyer, Connor Shaw and Johnny Manziel as their quarterbacks.

No slight of any of the quarterbacks, but a point around Loggains might be not how little the offenses achieved in his time with them, but rather, how much.

“I think that I’ve had an opportunity working with Kyle Shanahan in Cleveland and Adam Gase this last year, obviously there’s stuff I’ve taken from both of them,” Loggains said. “Going back in the quarterback room, I think it was good for me. It was a good experience. Things you obviously change are, ‘hey, in Tennessee I like the way we did this and we’ll bring that here. In Cleveland, I like the way we did whatever.’. So it’s gaining knowledge from being around other people and being in different situations.”

Notre Dame unit preview: DeShone Kizer, Malik Zaire and the quarterbacks

Notre Dame unit preview: DeShone Kizer, Malik Zaire and the quarterbacks

With the start of Notre Dame preseason camp fast approaching, we’re looking at what to expect from each unit that’ll take the field in primetime Sept. 4 against Texas at Darrell K. Royal Stadium. 

Depth Chart

1A. DeShone Kizer (Redshirt sophomore)
1B. Malik Zaire (Redshirt junior)
2. Brandon Wimbush (Sophomore)
3. Ian Book (Freshman)

All eyes will be on Notre Dame’s quarterback competition in August, with coach Brian Kelly saying after spring practice Kizer and Zaire were entering the summer on an even playing field. Zaire needed the spring to catch up to Kizer in terms of some of the offensive wrinkles installed after his season-ending ankle injury in the second week of the season. 

Both quarterbacks will get an opportunity to win the starting job during preseason camp, though the slight edge has to go to Kizer given his experience (11 starts) against that of Zaire (three starts). While Zaire’s potential remains high (he did, after all, quarterback Notre Dame’s best win of the season last year, that 38-3 shellacking of Texas), Kizer showed last fall plenty of the traits Kelly has wanted out of a quarterback since arriving in South Bend in December of 2009. Kizer takes coaching well and rarely made the same mistakes on a week-to-week basis, and he accounted for 31 touchdowns with some solid other numbers, too. 

That’s not to say Zaire can’t win the job next month, but he probably has more of an uphill climb to earn it than Kizer does. 

Biggest question: When will a starting QB be announced?

Kelly said during spring practice he wants his offense to form an identity around a starting quarterback, so don’t expect this decision to drag on until right before kickoff of the Texas game (Ohio State’s handling of the Cardale Jones-J.T. Barrett competition last year stands as a lesson in how to not make a quarterback and an offense comfortable). The preseason camp portion of Notre Dame’s August practices usually runs for about two weeks, so with a start date of Aug. 6, expect Kelly to announce a starter sometime after Aug. 20. 

Whether that announcement becomes public is another question, but Kizer, Zaire and Notre Dame’s offense likely will have have about two weeks of practice/meetings before the Texas game knowing who their starting quarterback is. 

Youthful impact

Wimbush appeared in two games last year, with Kelly, Mike Sanford & Co. seeing the necessity to burn his redshirt to get him in-game reps in case he needed to take meaningful snaps in a College Football Playoff race. Kelly in the spring walked back a comment he made in February about planning to redshirt Wimbush this fall, but if Kizer and Zaire both stay healthy, Notre Dame would probably prefer to keep the talented sophomore on the sidelines in 2016. 

Book enrolled in Notre Dame this summer with far less hype than his predecessors (he was only a three-star recruit), but Sanford raved about his skillset and fit in the Irish offense on signing day in February. He’ll likely take a redshirt year and begin his quest to move up the rungs of the depth chart in 2017. 

They said it

“They are both that good. I already know that. But there will be a day, and we're going to have to say: It's time to go, he's our quarterback, everybody's behind him and we need to go, and that's who the quarterback is.” — Brian Kelly