Bulls fall to George, Pacers after late no-call

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Bulls fall to George, Pacers after late no-call

As hotly contested as the Bulls-Pacers rivalry has been over the past few seasons, its no surprise that Tuesday nights game at the United Center came down to the wire. In a low-scoring affair, the Bulls (8-8) withstood an offensive onslaught from Pacers (9-9) swingman Paul George and had a chance to send the game into overtime late, but a controversial no-call on a Luol Deng drive to the basket was a crucial part of how the hosts dropped the 80-76 contest.
As usual when these two teams face off, it was a close-knit affair from the outset, with the emphasis on defense or at least not a lot of offensive productivity. For the Pacers, George (34 points, nine rebounds) came out firing, showing off both his vast potential and diverse scoring repertoire.
The Bulls were sparked by another strong effort from the frontcourt trio of Deng, Carlos Boozer and Joakim Noah, all of whom were active from the early going and asserted themselves as scorers. However, propelled by the play of George, the Bulls trailed, 20-18, at the conclusion of the opening period.
Deng carried over his aggressive play to the second quarter and with support from the second unit, the Bulls eventually overtook their guests. Nate Robinson, in particular, filling in for a foul-burdened Kirk Hinrich, provided a boost with his instant-offense game.
Behind George and point guard George Hill, the visitors stayed within close contact with the hosts in the choppy, whistle-plagued contest. At the intermission, though, the Bulls held a 37-25 advantage.
After the break, Hinrichs playmaking and the scoring of Duke products Deng (17 points, seven rebounds) and Boozer were the primary catalysts for the Bulls. But Indiana, led by Georgehis stellar play was expected by many observers prior to the season, but the athletic wing has had some uneven performances in the wake of sidelined star Danny Grangers knee injurywho got ample help from center Roy Hibbert (10 points, 11 rebounds).
Suddenly, the Bulls found themselves in a hole, creeping toward a double-digit margin, and the Pacers maintained separation from their hosts as the period waned on. Heading into the final stanza, the Bulls narrowed the gap a bit, but they were still on the wrong end of a 60-55 score.
Reserves Robinson and Jimmy Butler breathed life into the previously dormant United Center crowd. Butler got a steal and subsequent dunk in transition to start things off, followed by Robinson (19 points) going on a personal 7-0 runhe hit a triple to beat the shot clock, made a fast-break layup and concluded his spurt with a floaterbefore George knocked down a long-distance shot of his own to silence the partisan audience.
The damage was done, however, as the Bulls seized control of both the lead and the game, heading into the contests stretch run, but George refused to relent, carrying the Pacers on his back to ensure the visitors wouldnt be run out of the building until it was officially time for them to go. George was unconscious, hitting shots from every angle with one of the leagues top defenders in Deng, draped all over him and in this slugfest, his contested jumper to make it 76-74 in Indianas favor with 2:06 remaining had the effect of a last-second dagger.
Bulls miscues, whether unforced or simply bad bounces, plagued the hosts late and after Lance Stephenson converted a layupon which he was fouled, but missed the ensuing free throwwith 45.5 seconds left, it looked to be a done deal. Boozer (14 points, 10 rebounds) had a chance to cut it to a one-point deficit with a three-point play opportunity of his own with 37.2 seconds to go, but like Stephenson, he also missed the foul shot.
Down two points, the Bulls got a big defensive stop and after Taj Gibson secured the rebound with 14.1 seconds on the clock, they called a timeout before a chance to tie the game at 78 apiece or even go ahead for the win. After the inbounds pass, Noah got the ball to a cutting Deng on the baseline and though he drew contact from Hibbertthe center had his arms outstretched, but it was a controversial decision, as evidenced by the home fans displeasureno call was made and after a pair of David West (10 points, nine rebounds, five assists) free throws with 5.2 seconds to play, it was all academic.

Bad blood fueled Bears-Vikings playoff bout profiled in 'Bears Classics: Eclipsing Moon'

Bad blood fueled Bears-Vikings playoff bout profiled in 'Bears Classics: Eclipsing Moon'

From the high ground of hindsight, what unfolded in the Metrodome that day in 1995 was actually quite a big deal. But not for reasons that you could have really understood at the time watching the Bears stun the Minnesota Vikings 35-18 in the wild card round of the 1994 playoffs.

It was not so much the game alone. It was the overall context of the time for the Bears, before and after.

Though the 1995 season would get off to a 6-2 start for the Bears before their near-historic collapse, the Minnesota game would prove to be the high-water mark for the coaching tenure of Dave Wannstedt. This was the postseason, and the Bears looked to be going where then-president Mike McCaskey envisioned when he made the play to beat the New York Giants in securing Wannstedt, who was unquestionably the hot coaching prospect coming out of the Dallas Super Bowl pantheon after the 1992 season.

To fully grasp the situation, you need to understand the undercurrent of venom that had developed between the Bears and Vikings. Bears-Packers might have been the glitzy rivalry, but what had grown between the Bears and Vikings was true hostility, with little of the respect that the Bears and Packers had managed. The Vikings carried grudges for Pro Bowl slights going back almost to the Bears' Super Bowl win. One Bears defensive lineman remarked that his most hated opponent was Minnesota right tackle Tim Irwin, adding, "He's a guy that, if I ran over him with a car, I'd back up over him to make sure I got him." Dwayne Rudd's backpedaling taunt after an interception came a couple years later, but you get the idea.

What's easily forgotten looking back through the mists of time was the epic decision made by Wannstedt to make a quarterback change, from a quarterback he wanted in free agency to one he knew well from their time together at the University of Miami. That was every bit the turning point of the season and the real reason the playoff trip and win ever happened.

The Bears had been annihilated in their first game against the Vikings in the 1994 season — 42-14 — and something was really, really wrong, which become glaringly more evident just a few weeks later, even though the Bears were reaching a 4-2 mark under quarterback Erik Kramer, the centerpiece of an aggressive offseason foray into free agency. But the Bears then lost — badly — to the Lions and Packers, with Kramer throwing three interceptions against Detroit and two against Green Bay, the latter in only 10 pass attempts.

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I talked privately to Kramer after the Green Bay game, specifically about why it was that he was playing his absolute worst against Detroit, Green Bay and Minnesota, all teams with which he was intimately familiar. My thought: You know those defenses and where their people are going to be.

Kramer shook his head: "The 'other guys' I know. It's my own guys. I don't know where they're supposed to be."

It wasn't a comment on his receivers whatsoever. It was Kramer admitting bluntly that he was not getting the West Coast scheme of coordinator Ron Turner and its timing element.

Wannstedt knew it wasn't working and made the change to Steve Walsh, who'd been the Hurricanes' quarterback under Jimmy Johnson when Wannstedt was the defensive coordinator.

That was the tipping point, and Walsh and Wannstedt are among the principals of "Bears Classics: Eclipsing Moon," airing on Monday at 8 p.m. on CSN.

Anyone with any time spent in or around the NFL knows that beating a team three times in a season is incredibly difficult. The Bears had been blown out in the first Minnesota game but had pushed the Vikings to overtime in the second and would have won had Kevin Butler not missed a 40-yard field goal try.

The playoff meeting was No. 3, and after the Vikings put up a field goal in the first quarter, the Bears scored with a Lewis Tillman touchdown in the second and just pulled steadily away from the winner of the only NFL division that produced four teams with winning records.

From there it would be another decade-plus — 2006 season — before the Bears would win a playoff game.

New Fire acquisition Dax McCarty tweets thank you to Red Bull fans

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USA TODAY

New Fire acquisition Dax McCarty tweets thank you to Red Bull fans

When the Chicago Fire traded for midfielder Dax McCarty it surprised many around Major League Soccer.

McCarty had been with the New York Red Bulls for five and a half seasons and served as the team's captain in recent years. He was a central figure in the club's identity and success (2013 and 2015 Supporters' Shield winners). His departure was devastating to many fans and came at a busy time in McCarty's life.

He got married two days before the trade and had just arrived with the U.S. national team for the annual January camp that takes place during the MLS offseason and largely features domestically based players.

On Sunday McCarty took to Twitter to thank Red Bulls fans in a lengthy note.

McCarty says he was blindsided by the trade.

"I have been in the league long enough to know how things work, yet somehow I was still surprised," McCarty said in the note. "I've been sitting here for a week trying to process everything, and I still can't quite come up with the words to describe how I'm feeling."

McCarty then thanked his teammates, the support staff with the Red Bulls, Red Bulls fans and his wife.

"To the fans: Thank you for giving me 5 1/2 of the best years of my life," he wrote.

The note is similar to what Harry Shipp tweeted after the Fire traded the Lake Forest native to the Montreal Impact. Shipp was again traded this offseason, to reigning MLS Cup champion Seattle.

One difference between the two is that Shipp mentioned being excited to join Montreal. McCarty made no mention of Chicago or the Fire.

"It will be weird stepping onto the field at Red Bull Arena as an opponent, but I'll always cherish the memories we made together, as a family," McCarty wrote. "If you could do me one huge favor and not chant "metro reject" when I come back, I would greatly appreciate it."

Metro reject is an old chant for former players in reference the club's previous name, New York/New Jersey Metrostars. The Fire visit Red Bull Arena on April 29.

The Fire open preseason training on Monday, although McCarty won't be there because he is still in camp with the national team.