Bulls & White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on 'Inside Look' (debuts Wed, Mar. 14 at 7:00 PM)

Bulls & White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on 'Inside Look' (debuts Wed, Mar. 14 at 7:00 PM)

CHICAGO BULLS & CHICAGO WHITE SOX CHAIRMAN JERRY REINSDORF TO BE THE NEXT FEATURED GUESTON COMCAST SPORTSNETS MONTHLY INTERVIEW SERIES, INSIDE LOOK

Inside Look presented by Cadillac, hosted by Comcast SportsNets Chuck Garfien, featuring Jerry Reinsdorf
to debut Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM

CSNChicago.com to provide additional web extras coverage of Inside Look, including extended video clips
Chicago, IL (March 8, 2012) Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, continues to delve into the lives of some of the biggest names in Chicago sports with its candid, monthly, one-on-one interview series Inside Look presented by Cadillac.

Debuting Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM -- which tips-off a huge night on Bulls programming on Comcast SportsNet with a special, one-hour edition of McDonalds Bulls Pre-Game Live airing at 7:30 PM, followed by an Eastern Conference showdown featuring the Bulls hosting the rival Miami Heat at 8:30 PM -- Comcast SportsNets Chuck Garfien hosts an exclusive one-on-one interview with Chicago Bulls & White Sox Chairman JERRY REINSDORF.
Reinsdorf discusses everything in this forthright interview including his good fortune of buying the Bulls franchise in 1985, winning the World Series in 2005, winning six NBA Championships in the 1990s, winning the NBA Draft Lottery allowing the Bulls to draft the reigning MVP Derrick Rose, his thoughts on what made Michael Jordan one of the greatest players in NBA history and much more. Plus Reinsdorf also tells the story about the first time he met Jordan, the best White Sox team hes ever had (and its not the 2005 championship team), and he receives a special, surprise visit during the interview from former White Sox All-Star slugger Jim Thome.

In addition, viewers are urged to check out Comcast SportsNets website, CSNChicago.com, for additional web extras interview content never before seen on TV. Fans will also be able to watch every Inside Look guest interview online after it debuts on Comcast SportsNet.

Comcast SportsNet will also re-air Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf on the following datestimes: Wed, Mar. 14 at 11:30pm - Fri, Apr. 6 at 4:30pm - Wed, Apr. 11 at 2:30pm - Fri, Apr. 13 at 4:30pm - Sun, Apr. 15 at 8pm - Wed, Apr. 18 at 11pm - Thu, Apr. 19 at 4:30pm - Sun, Apr. 22 at 2pm and 8:30pm & Wed, Apr. 25 at 9pm.

Note the following quotes from Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf presented by Cadillac premiering Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM on Comcast SportsNet:

REINSDORF on the White Sox winning the 2005 World Series:

"In the spring of 2005, I said this is going to be my 25th year, maybe we're never going to win a World Series. I don't know if it will ever happen. And then it happened. I am still appreciating the moment. The moment wasn't when we won...I mean that was exciting, you know my God we won the World Series...although it wasn't a shock because we were up three games to nothing. What really happened to make it sink in was the parade. There were two million people, there wasn't one arrest, there wasn't one incident. You could see the love coming to the players from those people. Then there were people coming up to me telling me they had gone to the cemetery and decorated their parents or grandparents graves. You could go to any cemetery in Chicago and the graves were decorated with White Sox paraphernalia. And then the next spring a gentleman came up to me in the parking lot and said my father died 15 minutes after the last out, he knew and he died happy. Those things will never, ever leave me.

REINSDORF on his luck buying the Bulls:

"There's been luck at everything I've ever done. (White Sox Executive Vice President) Howard Pizer and I have a little joke between us when we have a problem and can't figure out the solution to the problem. I'll say to Howard, what are we going to do? And Howard's answer will be, well, we'll get lucky, because everything I've ever done, I've had a tremendous amount of good luck. A little bad luck along the way, but the good luck so outweighs it. In that case, the good luck was they had drafted Michael Jordan. At the time we made the deal, no one knew what Michael Jordan was going to be, and I don't think they would have sold the team if they had known what he was going to be. So clearly, I was lucky."

REINSDORF on winning six NBA titles with the Bulls:

I was incredibly proud to be associated with the Chicago Bulls and what they had done. The Bulls are a worldwide phenomenonled by Michael (Jordan), but it was a great team. You have to give Jerry Krause a lot of credit because the only two players who were on the second 3-peat that were on the first 3-peat were Michael and Scottie (Pippen).

What Jerry said was Organizations win championships and it is true. Now, players are part of the organization. At the end of the day, the players have to win the game. But how did they get there? Who put them together? They didn't just drop out of the sky. They have to be coached...they have to have physical training. It really takes a whole organization, but a great organization has to have great players.

REINSDORF on winning the NBA Draft Lottery in 2008 (despite having just a 1.7 chance), which allowed the Bulls to draft reigning NBA MVP Derrick Rose:

Two months before (the NBA Draft Lottery), John Paxson and I were talking and Paxson said, 'Where are we going to get a point guard? We've got to get a point guard. I said, 'I don't know, we'll win the lottery, we'll take Derrick Rose. I knew he was going to be a very good player. I can't say I expected him to be an MVP in his third year. What's really good is that he's grounded. He really hasn't changed since he got here. He comes from a solid background. He was protected when he was growing up. He is a lot like Michael in that he just wants to win basketball games.

John Goossens' return could be key for the Fire

John Goossens' return could be key for the Fire

For much of this season the Chicago Fire have struggled not just to score goals, but to create chances.

The Fire moved out of last place in Major League Soccer in goals scored after putting in three in a loss at Philadelphia last week, but are still last place in total shots (157) and shots on target (43). For context, the team just above the Fire in shots on target is San Jose with 60 and Vancouver leads the league with 109.

In Tuesday's U.S. Open Cup victory against Columbus there was a welcome face starting in the midfield for the first time since April 16: John Goossens. Goossens made his return from a sprained LCL in Philadelphia, but came off the bench in that match.

Goossens' impact against the Crew was immediately seen in his assist to David Accam on the opening goal in the seventh minute. Goossens got control of the ball in his own half and was able to dribble forward into Columbus' third. When the defense finally closed him down, Goossens was able to weave through a pair of defenders and hit Accam with a pass. Accam did the rest of the work with an impressive finish, but it's reasonable to think no other player on the Fire is able to get the ball to Accam in that spot, at least not in the same way.

“I think he’s calm and comfortable on the ball,” Fire coach Veljko Paunovic said of Goossens. “He has actually very good offensive perception of the game.

“He was relief for us when we were building out of the back. In the moments when we had to win and have a progression in our build up he showed up and that’s very important and positive for the team.”

Goossens had a number of opportunities with the ball and the Fire’s pair of speedy forwards, Accam and Kennedy Igboananike, running in front of him.

“It was really easy for me once I get the ball behind their midfield, between their midfield and defensive line,” Goossens said. “I had all the time to turn and to look for those two fast guys. They scored two amazing goals.”

Goossens subbed out of the game after 60 minutes, which was expected given it was his first start in more than two months.

The problem so far is that Goossens hasn't been able to stay healthy this season. He hasn't played a full 90 minutes yet this season and has only made seven appearances this season.

That said, when Goossens has played he has made a difference. The assist to Accam was his third of the season. In addition, the team has performed its best with Goossens on the field. Even before Tuesday's 2-1 win, Goossens had the best plus-minus, to borrow a hockey stat, on the Fire.

When Goossens has been on the field in MLS play, the Fire have a plus-two goal differential. Of course there are a lot of factors that go into that with 11 players on the field, but plus-two is a notable difference from the Fire's overall goal differential of minus-six. The only other player on the team with a positive plus-minus is Arturo Alvarez at plus-one.

“We missed him,” Accam said. “He is one of our creative players and I’m really happy we have him back on the pitch. If we get Arturo back then we are perfect for us strikers because we need the midfielders to feed us good balls and today Goossens did that. Hopefully that will continue.”

Cubs win wild 15-inning thriller over Reds

Cubs win wild 15-inning thriller over Reds

CINCINNATI (AP) — Kris Bryant singled home the tiebreaking run in the 15th inning and the Chicago Cubs used three pitchers in left field while beating the Cincinnati Reds 7-2 on Tuesday night in the longest game of the season for both teams.

With the Cubs out of position players, relievers Travis Wood and Spencer Patton (1-0) alternated between left field and the mound in the 14th inning, which ended with Patton getting the final out. Wood then finished it off with reliever Pedro Stropin left.

Bryant's only hit on Tuesday - a single off J.J. Hoover (1-2) - snapped the tie. Javier Baez added a grand slam in the 15th, the sixth career allowed by Hoover, which is a Reds record.

The National League's top team went 1-6 last week but has pulled out of the downturn by winning the first two games of a series against the Reds. The Cubs hit five homers - three by Bryant - while taking the opener 11-8.

Eugenio Suarez singled home the tying run with two outs in the ninth off Hector Rondon, his third blown save in 16 chances, setting the game on its meandering course.

Ben Zobrist led off the game with a homer off left-hander John Lamb. Left-hander Jon Lester singled home another run and allowed only one hit until the eighth inning, when Billy Hamilton homered. The Cubs' closer couldn't hold on.

A lot of the focus Tuesday was on Bryant, who was coming off a historic performance.

Bryant became the first major league player to hit three homers and two doubles in a game on Monday night. He set a Cubs record with 16 total bases and became the youngest Cubs player to hit three homers in a game since Ernie Banks did it in 1955, also at the age of 24.

Bryant broke his three-homer bat the first time up on Tuesday, cracking it on a groundout. The bat boy retrieved it and took it to the Major League Baseball authenticator, who labeled the bat and safely stored it. Bryant flied out, walked twice, fouled out with two runners aboard for the final out in the 10th, and struck out in the 13th before driving in the go-ahead run.

TRAINER'S ROOM

Reds: RHP Homer Bailey felt fine a day after throwing an inning in his first rehab start. Bailey, who is recovering from Tommy John surgery 13 months ago, is expected to pitch again on Saturday ... 2B Brandon Phillips fouled a ball off the inside of his left foot in the first inning. He fouled another pitch off the same foot in his next at-bat and got hit in the left side by a pitch from Rondon in the ninth.

UP NEXT

Cubs: Kyle Hendricks (5-6, 2.76) is 1-5 with a 3.79 ERA in seven road starts this season. He's 4-1 with a 1.93 ERA in seven home games.

Reds: Cody Reed (0-1, 6.75) makes his third career start. In his first appearance at Great American Ball Park last Friday, he gave up five runs in five innings of a 13-4 loss to the Padres.

White Sox offense struggles in front of Quintana in shutout loss to Twins

White Sox offense struggles in front of Quintana in shutout loss to Twins

The White Sox haven’t had many big hits in their last dozen games.

The White Sox never seem to deliver any timely knocks in Jose Quintana starts.

Those two forces collided in a 4-0 loss to the Minnesota Twins on Tuesday night in front of 22,072 at U.S. Cellular Field.

Quintana allowed two Brian Dozier home runs, including a decisive three-run shot in the sixth inning, and dropped a seventh straight decision. His offense finished 0-for-8 with runners in scoring position as Kyle Gibson twirled seven scoreless innings.

Outfielder Melky Cabrera also left the game early with a sore left wrist.

“We didn’t do nothing as hitters,” third baseman Todd Frazier said. “We have to find a way. We had an off day. Everybody was nice and relaxed coming back. We’re professionals here as hitters. We have to find ways to get guys in.”

The White Sox didn’t have many shots against Gibson.

They butchered those that they did.

No opportunity was bigger than the third inning, which began with singles by J.B. Shuck and Tim Anderson in front of the team’s 2-3-4 hitters. But Gibson delivered and the White Sox failed yet again.

Down 1-0, Adam Eaton couldn’t move the runners over as he flew out to center. Jose Abreu followed suit and flew out to center before Cabrera — who left in the top of the seventh and is listed as day-to-day — popped out to second.

One inning earlier, Brett Lawrie was stranded in scoring position when Gibson got Avisail Garcia to chase a two-strike pitch off the plate and in the dirt. It was more of the same in the fifth when Eaton flew out to center with a man on second. And again in the seventh when Shuck flew out and Anderson grounded into a fielder’s choice with two aboard.

“It started out well,” manager Robin Ventura said. “You get them on there. Any time we seemed to get something going against Gibson, he just really started going soft and using your aggressiveness against you. I think that's part of what played into it. He had a very good changeup, he used his curve when he had to. He went a little bit backwards. Any time we got into an aggressive count, he just took a little off. We couldn't get anything going against him.”

The team’s effort was the continuance of a nasty trend.

The White Sox are 12-for-98 (.122) with runners in scoring position in their last 12 games. The lengthy slump dropped them from hitting a formidable .260 with RISP, which ranked in the top half of the league, to below .240, which ranks in the bottom third.

That the performance arrived with Quintana on the mound should come as no surprise.

Whereas the White Sox scored 25 runs in Quintana’s first seven starts, they’ve relapsed into their old non-scoring selves whenever he takes the hill. Over his last nine starts, Quintana has had nine runs of support.

The left-hander said the lack of support isn’t something he focuses on because it’s out of his hands.

“I don’t have control on the runs,” Quintana said. “I say the same every time. But I don’t have control, man. I try to keep going. I try to be better next time and keep going. Next time be better out there, better outing and better everything.

“I never think about that. I just try to pay attention and do my job, focusing on throwing the ball well and that’s it.”

Quintana made two mistakes in seven otherwise solid innings.

Dozier’s solo homer to leadoff the second inning gave the Twins, who improved to 25-51, a one-run lead.

Eduardo Nunez then led off the sixth inning with a single and stole second base. He advanced to third on a passed ball. Quintana then walked Joe Mauer and Dozier made him pay when he got enough of a 2-1 curveball low and in to drive it out for a three-run homer and a 4-0 lead.

Quintana — who is 5-8 despite a 3.18 ERA — allowed six hits, walked one and struck out eight.

“I’m sure inside he’s frustrated,” Frazier said. “I would be too. He’s a competitor, gives it his all. One bad pitch.”