Fantasy baseball hitter stocks

Fantasy baseball hitter stocks

By David Ferris


Norichika Aoki, OF, Brewers: He's established himself as a nice fit at the top of the Milwaukee lineup, hitting .313 ore the last month with solid counting stats (14 runs, two homers, 11 RBIs, six steals). Aoki makes contact 87 percent of the time and runs the bases well, so you can live with his mediocre walk rate. In a year where so many things have gone wrong in Milwaukee, Aoki is a breath of fresh air. And his so-so defense won't hurt you in our fake baseball game.

Logan Morrison, 1BOF, Marlins: At some point over the last year Morrison got overrated as a Tweeter and underrated as a solid bat. He's hitting .284 over the last month with six homers and 19 RBIs, and the Marlins will live with his atrocious defense. Morrison's slugging stats don't fall off against lefties, but he hasn't taken to Miami's new park as of yet (.686 OPS home, 859 OPS road). But this still looks like Nick Johnson 2.0 (less patience, a little more power), and we mean that in the nicest possible way.


Jed Lowrie, SS, Astros: He's fallen into a .211.324.430 funk over the last 34 games and he doesn't have a stolen base during that period, either. The Astros would be wise to consider Lowrie offers all month - he's never proven that he can stay healthy for an extended period of time and he's going to move off shortstop sooner or later (his range is limited). See if someone will overpay for his 14 homers.

Ty Wigginton, Utility, Phillies: Right-handed pitchers are absolutely eating his lunch (.301 OBP, .373 slugging) and the Phillies are no longer short in the lineup with Chase Utley and Ryan Howard back. If GM Ruben Amaro can get any kind of token offer for Wigginton this month, he should trade him. This sort of utility player is handy off the bench, but there's not enough juice for mixed rotisserie leaguers.

Allen Craig, Utility, Cardinals: It's hard to look at that .313.377.614 line and think about a trade, but maybe you can get someone to enthusiastically chase after this guy (and overpay). Craig might be sitting once or twice a week with Lance Berkman close to a return, and Craig's injury history also has to be accounted for. Please don't give him away, but keep an open mind here.


Trevor Plouffe, Utility, Twins: The 19 homers come as a surprise, sure, but it's not completely out of nowhere - Plouffe was the 20th overall pick in the 2004 draft and he showed pop in the minors. And Target Field is actually a solid power park for right-handed sluggers - it's the lefties who can't reach the seats in the Twin Cities. Plouffe's home stats speak to the point: 12 homers, .633 slugging. A modest regression might be on the way, but Plouffe looks like a sure thing to hit 30-plus homers and he's now a fixture in the lineup.
Justin Ruggiano, OF, Marlins: We promoted him last week and we'll briefly drop his name again, since Giancarlo Stanton (knee scope) needs at least a month off. Ruggiano has never been given a chance to play in the majors consistently, so perhaps the Quad-A label isn't fair. He has a shot to be a 10-homer, 10-steal source in the second half.

Week 8 Big Ten previews: After last week's clash, Badgers, Buckeyes hit the road


Week 8 Big Ten previews: After last week's clash, Badgers, Buckeyes hit the road

Last week's battle between Ohio State and Wisconsin was one for the ages.

But a week after the thriller proved both teams are championship-caliber, both hit the road for in-division tests that will certainly keep them on their toes.

If we're going to get a Buckeyes-Badgers rematch for the Big Ten title in Indy, Ohio State will first need to fend off Penn State in Happy Valley and Wisconsin will have to avoid a third loss at Iowa.

Check out previews of those games and the full Week 8 Big Ten slate below. All games are played on Saturday, Oct. 22, and all times are Central.

Rutgers at Minnesota, 11 a.m., ESPN U

Whether Mitch Leidner will be back under center or not for the Gophers remains a mystery, but it surely will be a fresh face at quarterback for the Scarlet Knights after Chris Ash made a switch at the position this week, elevating Giovanni Rescigno to replace Chris Laviano. Rutgers could use any and every method to try and get its stumbling offense off the ground. The Knights were shut out, of course, by a combined 136-0 score in two games against top-three teams Ohio State and Michigan. But in two other Big Ten games — these against the much less impressive competition of Iowa and Illinois — Rutgers still mustered only a combined 14 points. Losing Janarion Grant was obviously the big blow. Maybe Rescigno can do something against Minnesota.

The Gophers, meanwhile, will look to replicate the rushing success they had a week ago against Maryland, when Rodney Smith ran for 144 yards and a pair of touchdowns and Shannon Brooks chipped in with 82 yards. That should be possible given that the Rutgers defense has been gashed on the ground by each of its last three opponents. Ohio State rushed for 410 yards, and Michigan went for 481 yards on the ground, eye-popping numbers from two of the best teams in America. But even Illinois rushed for a less-superhuman but still good 228 yards last weekend, a mighty good sign for the Gophers. Oh, and the Minnesota defense has surrendered just two touchdowns in the past two games.

No. 10 Wisconsin at Iowa, 11 a.m., ESPN

This game’s an interesting one when you look at the big picture of this season. Wisconsin, despite its two losses to two of the top three teams in the country, has looked tremendous this season and boasts a top-10 ranking. Iowa has no ranking to speak of thanks to two relatively embarrassing home defeats to North Dakota State and Northwestern. But it’s the Hawkeyes — because just one of those losses has come in conference play — who are ahead of the Badgers in the Big Ten West Division standings. So while a Wisconsin win might be far more anticipated this weekend, an Iowa win would make Wisconsin’s path to a division title extremely difficult. Of course, it’s undefeated Nebraska atop those standings, so right now the road to Indy goes through Lincoln.

When it comes to this week’s game, as mentioned, Wisconsin seems the overwhelming favorite. The Badgers’ defense has looked stellar even through two losses in the previous two games against Michigan and Ohio State. Wisconsin ranks eighth nationally in scoring defense (15.2 points per game) and 12th in total defense (311.3 yards per game) and gets a big boost this weekend with the return of linebacker Vince Biegel. The Badgers made the Wolverines and Buckeyes fight every last minute for the wins those teams pulled off. A Jekyll-and-Hyde Hawkeyes offense might have far more trouble, though it put up a whole mess of points and 520 yards last weekend against Purdue.

Two weeks ago, you would’ve been inclined to peg this as yet another defensive battle, what with Alex Hornibrook coming off that bad game against Michigan and the Iowa defense coming off a shut-down performance against Minnesota. But then the Hawkeyes went into West Lafayette and surrendered a monstrous second half to the Boilermakers, finishing the game with 35 points and 505 yards allowed. And Hornibrook and the Badgers’ offense looked terrific through a half against the Buckeyes’ defense last weekend and even pulled off a huge touchdown drive in the fourth quarter during an otherwise-silent second half.

Indiana at Northwestern, 11 a.m., Big Ten Network

Forget about the Northwestern team that started the season 1-3. As Pat Fitzgerald said earlier this week: “That team’s dead.” It certainly seems that way, as the Cats — who as you might rememberer scored just seven points in a loss to Illinois State — combined for 92 points and 852 total yards in a pair of eye-popping road victories over Iowa and Michigan State. Believe it or not, Northwestern boasts the Big Ten’s leading running back (Justin Jackson is averaging 116.3 yards a game after a career-high 188 yards last weekend) and the Big Ten’s leading receiver (Austin Carr is averaging 99.2 yards a game on 7.2 catches a game after a career-high 11 catches last weekend). An offense that couldn’t do a thing last season is now lighting up scoreboards across the conference.

The good news for this week’s Northwestern opponent, Indiana, is that this team actually plays defense now. As jarring as an explosive Wildcat offense is for those who watched last season, a capable Hoosier defense is just as noticeable. New defensive coordinator Tom Allen has worked some real magic, and now Indiana has good play on both sides of the ball, fifth in the conference in total offense and eighth in total defense. Those rankings might not seem like much to crow about, but remember the Hoosiers have been the Big Ten’s worst defensive team for seemingly the entirety of Kevin Wilson’s time there. Revitalized offense vs. revitalized defense? This could be a fun one in Evanston.

Illinois at No. 3 Michigan, 2:30 p.m., Big Ten Network

This one’s shaping up to be another Michigan blowout, something the Wolverines have done in all of its wins but one to this point. Jim Harbaugh’s team is probably the nation’s finest when it comes to statistics, leading the country by limiting opponents to 10.3 points a game and ranking second (only behind Louisville) by scoring 50 points a game. Michigan had a bye last weekend, which has given it two weeks to prepare for a clearly overmatched Illinois team that last week got its first win over an FBS opponent under Lovie Smith. Throw out the 14-7 win over Wisconsin, and Michigan’s average margin of victory in those other five games is 46.2.

The Illini did have reason to be happy last weekend, getting Smith his first Big Ten win and his first win over a team not named Murray State. The quarterback situation is once again up in the air this weekend: Will Wes Lunt play, or will it be another game of Chayce Crouch? The only way Illinois keeps from disappearing out of Michigan’s rear-view mirror in the first quarter is by continuing to have success on the ground. The duo of Kendrick Foster and Reggie Corbin has served the Illini well, the team gaining a total of 543 rushing yards in the past two games. But those games were against Purdue and Rutgers. Michigan allows an average of 99.2 rush yards a game, the eighth-best rush defense in the nation.

Purdue at No. 8 Nebraska, 2:30 p.m., ABC/ESPN 2

Has there been a quieter top-10 team this season than the Huskers? Mike Riley’s team has a perfect record through six games, but the schedule hasn’t featured any marquee wins to date. Even the big win over Oregon looks nowhere near as big these days, with the Ducks nose-diving (bill-diving?) to a 2-4 record. But Nebraska has been real good, obviously led by Tommy Armstrong, who’s been perhaps the Big Ten’s next-best quarterback after Heisman candidate J.T. Barrett. And on defense, the Huskers’ secondary has been silently stellar, too. Only four teams in the country have intercepted more passes than Nebraska (which has 11), and only two teams in the country — Baylor and LSU —have allowed more touchdown passes than Nebraska (which has allowed only four). Remember that whole “the road to Indy goes through Lincoln” stuff from earlier? It’s true, but the Huskers will need to win this game to keep their record unblemished before back-to-back titanic tilts with Wisconsin and Ohio State.

Meanwhile, the Darrell Hazell Era came to an end last weekend at Purdue, and this will be the first game without the recently axed head coach. Despite how ugly the win-loss record always seems to look for the Boilermakers, things haven’t been all bad this season, even in light of what just happened to Hazell. Purdue is actually the No. 1 passing team in the Big Ten, averaging 305.5 yards through the air each week, and the total offense rank is fourth, with only the league's three undefeated teams ranking higher. When it comes to numbers, David Blough puts them up, there’s no doubt about that. Purdue’s lone Big Ten win last season came against Nebraska. Can that weird history repeat itself?

Michigan State at Maryland, 6:30 p.m., Big Ten Network

Both of these teams need a win, but Michigan State really needs to get off the schneid. It’s been four straight losses for a Spartans team that was again expected to compete for a Big Ten title. Well, that certainly won’t be happening this season, and the most recent loss was perhaps the most concerning. Michigan State allowed the most points it has in a home game in program history last weekend in the 54-40 loss to Northwestern. The defense has been miserable in the last four games, allowing an average of 34.8 points. On the season, the Spartans are now allowing more than 10 points per game more than they’re scoring. That’s trouble while the run game still struggles to produce and after Mark Dantonio’s quarterback experiment failed quickly last weekend.

Maryland also finds itself on a losing streak, two straight defeats after starting the season 4-0. During that undefeated beginning, the Terps were quietly a top-10 rushing team in the country, but that success has halted in recent weeks, with DJ Durkin’s team gaining 170 rush yards against Penn State and 130 yards against Minnesota. As mentioned, the Michigan State defense has been pretty gruesome, so perhaps this is the week Maryland can get its ground attack back on track.

No. 2 Ohio State at Penn State, 7 p.m., ABC

Will this be a repeat of the double-overtime thriller from 2014? Ohio State went into Happy Valley two years ago and was stymied by the Penn State defense, but the Buckeyes pulled out a huge character-building win en route to a national title. Some are saying this year’s version of that game came last weekend at Wisconsin, when Ohio State won an epic overtime affair. The Buckeyes are still undefeated after that test in Madison, with J.T. Barrett putting the team on his back in the second half and the defense rising to the occasion after a tough first half. Barrett scored three total touchdowns in that 2014 game against Penn State, including a pair of touchdown runs after regulation. Barrett’s Buckeyes once more have their sights on a national title and are looking the part. In addition to that 6-0 record, Ohio State ranks third in the country in scoring defense, fourth in the country in scoring offense, sixth in the country in total defense and 12th in the country in total offense.

While Barrett still runs the offense for Ohio State, one thing that almost surely won’t repeat itself from 2014 is Penn State’s rushing total. The Nittany Lions gained just 16 rushing yards in that game. You can almost guarantee that won’t be the case two years later, with Saquon Barkley looking like an absolute stud at every turn. At 97 yards a game, the sophomore ranks fourth in the Big Ten in rushing, but he has to be the conference leader in highlight-reel plays, making moves you’d have to mash your palm on a video-game controller to replicate. Ohio State’s defense is menacing, as those national rankings more than indicate. The Buckeyes rank third in the Big Ten with 121 rush yards allowed per game. But if Penn State can get Barkley going under Joe Moorhead’s new-and-improved offense, then maybe the Lions have a chance.

Notre Dame grades: Highs and lows on special teams

Notre Dame grades: Highs and lows on special teams

With Notre Dame in its bye week, we’re grading each unit on the 2-5 Irish. We’ve covered the coaching staff, offense and defense, so today we’re closing out the midterm report card with special teams. 

Placekicking: C

Justin Yoon already has more misses (three) on nine kicks than he had last year (two) on 17 attempts. A blocked attempt at Texas and a miss against Duke hurt in three-point losses, though his grade gets boosted a bit given he managed to connect on a field goal at N.C. State, which looked akin to kicking a bag of wet rags from a puddle (full credit to long snapper Scott Daly and holder Montgomery VanGorder, too, for successfully getting the ball down for Yoon in those awful conditions). 

Punting: C

It’s been a boom-or-bust season for Tyler Newsome, who’s blasted some bombs, like a 69-yarder at N.C. State, but also has had a few shanks, like his 24-yarder that gave Texas the ball at its own 32-yard line before the Longhorns drove to briefly take the lead in the fourth quarter of Notre Dame’s season-opening loss in Austin. Newsome ranks 29th in FBS with an average of 43.69 yards per punt, though this unit’s grade is dinged thanks to allowing that blocked punt/touchdown at N.C. State that wound up being the difference in Hurricane Matthew. 

Kick/punt returns: B+

C.J. Sanders remains an explosive returning weapon, taking a kick back 93 yards for a touchdown against Syracuse and nothing 40- and 24-yard punt returns in Notre Dame’s first two games of the season. A few points are taken off the grade here for a Michigan State punt bouncing off Miles Boykin’s calf and being recovered by the Spartans, which sparked their 36-point surge in mid-September. 

Kick/punt coverage: D+

Yoon has done a good job kicking directionally on kickoffs — he deftly placed a pair of kicks into the back corner of the end zone against Stanford, which would’ve been huge had Christian McCaffrey played — which is probably the biggest positive here. Shaun Wilson's 96-yard kickoff return took the shine off Notre Dame’s 14-0 early lead against Duke and helped propel the Blue Devils to a 38-35 win; on punt returns, the Irish rank 122nd in FBS, allowing 15.77 yards per return. 

Jarron Jones: A+

Jones gets his own grade here for his unique and, quite frankly, incredible knack for blocking kicks. The graduate student blocked a pair of PAT attempts against Texas and Syracuse that were each returned for two-point scores, with the one against Texas tying the game at 37. Jones has six blocked field goals/PATs in his career, earning himself a special distinction here in the special teams category.