John Danks 'can't fault' White Sox for decision to cut him

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John Danks 'can't fault' White Sox for decision to cut him

He’s disappointed in the decision and hopes to pitch again, but John Danks said Wednesday he understands why the White Sox moved on.

Speaking from his home in Nashville, Tenn., Danks said he would stay in pitching shape in case any teams call after his departure from the White Sox is finalized. The team’s longest-tenured player, Danks will officially be designated for assignment on Thursday, the White Sox announced on Tuesday. Danks said he began to believe his run with the club might be over after he lost on Thursday night in Baltimore, which dropped his record in four starts to 0-4 with a 7.25 ERA.

“I can’t fault anybody with the decision they made,” Danks said. “It’s a win-now league and I wasn’t helping the team win.

“The team is hot, the team is playing well. That’s obvious and you can’t go out there with four-fifths of a rotation, I totally understand that. It all starts with starting pitching, we’ve been told that since we were young. In order to win this thing, you have to have five starters giving you a shot every night out. Unfortunately, I wasn’t doing that in April.”

A member of the team since 2007 and in the final season of a five-year contract, Danks entered 2016 with the expectation he’d receive more than four starts before the White Sox cut him.

But Danks also expected more of himself.

He commanded his fastball and consistently hit 90 mph on the radar gun this spring, developments that had the White Sox cautiously optimistic Danks would regain some of the form that made him successful early in his career.

Yet Danks never once had an easy outing after the season began. Even in his best start on April 21, Danks worked around five hits and five walks to hold the Los Angeles Angels to two runs in six innings. After his loss Thursday, Danks said he felt he was in the way of something special in the White Sox clubhouse, which has thrived off energy and chemistry so far.

Danks said leaving his teammates was difficult. Chris Sale convinced him to stop by the clubhouse early Tuesday to say goodbye.

“I would say that was probably the hardest part,” Danks said. “Went in and hugged guys that were in there yesterday. We are having fun. Those guys are a blast to be around. It’s always more fun to win. Just the energy that gets brought in every day and the camaraderie and the trust in each other. You can see that on the field. Guys are willing to give themselves up for the better of the team.

“They do that because the other guy behind them does the same thing. It’s been a great month aside from four starts. I wish those guys nothing but the best. I’m a Sox fan for sure.”

Danks looks back fondly on his White Sox tenure, even if the four seasons after shoulder surgery didn’t go as planned. Though the results weren’t what he wanted, Danks is satisfied with his effort level. He also loves that he got to spend nine seasons living “in a badass city.”

But at 31, Danks isn’t quite ready to call it a career.

“I don't have any regrets, I worked as hard as I know how to and did my very best every time out and that's really all I could promise,” Danks said. “Certainly still is a desire to play. Now it's up to someone wanting me or not.

“I grew up there. Showed up as a baby, I was 21 years old when I made my first start and left as a 31-year-old man. I got to play with a lot of awesome teammates that have become lifelong friends now. Met a lot of people in a great organization. I don't know, I hadn't thought of my whole time just yet. I certainly had a lot of good times, some tough times, some struggles, but all in all I got to live a dream. Got to play a game, and yeah, I'm a very blessed man, no doubt.”

Cubs' Anthony Rizzo joins forces with Andrew Luck, Mike Trout to endorse sports drink

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Cubs' Anthony Rizzo joins forces with Andrew Luck, Mike Trout to endorse sports drink

Anthony Rizzo is branching out from his Bryzzo campaign to endorse a sports drink.

The Cubs star first baseman is part of an endorsement deal with BodyArmor, a sports drink brand. 

Rizzo's ads will appear in Chicagoland stores plus digital and social media circles, according to Sports Business Daily. He will also make public appearances to help promote the brand.

BodyArmor's other endorsers include Los Angeles Angels star Mike Trout, Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, Houston Rockets guard James Harden and golfer Dustin Johnson, aka Wayne Gretzky's son-in-law.

With enormous expectations and now a ridiculous 20-6 record to back it, the Cubs' inboxes have to be overflowing with marketing requests.

Beyond Bryzzo and Rizzo's new drink campaign, the Cubs first baseman also his his cereal while Joe Maddon is doing commercials in the Chicagoland area for Binny's, Jake Arrieta is both an underwear model and a suit model and Kris Bryant has his Express billboards.

Yeah, it's a good time to be a Cub.

After Bears release Antrel Rolle, Matt Slauson, question looms: Who else?

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After Bears release Antrel Rolle, Matt Slauson, question looms: Who else?

Just as the draft selections of guard Cody Whitehair heralded the Chicago end for Matt Slauson, and safeties Deon Bush and DeAndre Houston-Carson brought in alternatives to Antrel Rolle – both vets let go sooner rather than later – an obvious question hanging fire right now in the wake of other draft picks and signings is, “Who else?”

One expectation this offseason is that the Bears would make a difficult decision on rush-linebacker Lamarr Houston, who’s due $6 million this year and next and $8 million for 2018. That situation won’t stand as-is.

The final year of Willie Young’s contract calls for $2.5 million this season. That’s only slightly less than the $2.9 million Slauson was due for 2016 and that was rendered expendable by the Whitehair draft selection and the signings of Ted Larsen and Manny Ramirez.

In the Houston-Young cases, the Bears used a No. 1 pick on Leonard Floyd, a Young-type edge rusher. They used a No. 3 pick on Jonathan Bullard, a 290-pound defensive end with size-rush blend that Young doesn’t have. The Bears re-signed Sam Acho, who doesn’t give the Bears what Houston does as an edge rusher, but Houston doesn’t do anything on special teams, the roster entrée for non-starters.

Then there is the matter of Eddie Royal, with an injury speckled 2015 injury resume’ that defines “vulnerable” for player at age 30 and carrying a $4.5 million salary for 2016. What little the Bears did draft-wise on offense included diminutive wideout Danny Braverman in the seventh round.

Teams don’t make roster decisions based on seventh-round picks before the first minicamp. But Braverman, who led all FBS schools in receptions last year, is 5-10, around 180 pounds.

Forget the knee-jerk comparisons to Danny Amendola, Julian Edelman and Wes Welker just because they’re little white guys (and why is it that people grab those instant so-called comparables based on skin color? For another time.)

But NFL slot receivers in the Braverman mold include Seattle’s undrafted Doug Baldwin (5-10, 189, also a Florida native like Braverman); Randall Cobb (5-10) up in Green Bay, a No. 3 slot guy his first three NFL seasons; Jamison Crowder, a true smurf at 5-8 who caught 59 passes for Washington as a rookie.

Braverman does not make Royal roster-surplus the way Whitehair did Slauson, or Bush did Rolle, or Floyd makes Houston or Young (whom the Bears reportedly tried to trade during the draft). And Royal was banged up in part because he was thrust into a starter role by the injuries to Alshon Jeffery and Kevin White.

But numbers on depth charts and salary cap balance sheets force decisions. And the surprise of the offseason would be if the Bears were done making theirs.