Fire travel to San Jose on Saturday


Fire travel to San Jose on Saturday

The Fire has made three significant announcements since its 1-0 loss to Englands Aston Villa in Saturday nights international friendly at Toyota Park. None figure to have an effect on the next match, a road battle with the high-flying San Jose Earthquakes on Saturday.
Most noteworthy of the latest developments is the club's scheduling of a second such international match, which may well be a more popular attraction than the first. The Fire announced Wednesday that four-time Mexican first division champion Club Santos Laguna will come to Bridgeview on Sept. 8.
While Aston Villa was on the rebound from an off-season in the English Premier League, Santos Laguna is riding high in Mexico. The club beat Monterrey 3-2 on aggregate to take its league tournament and also placed second in the 2011-12 CONCACAF Champions League.
Santos Laguna's roster features Oswaldo Sanchez, the veteran goalkeeper for Mexico's national team, and striker Hercules Gomez, who has done time with the U.S. nationals. Gomez also played for the Los Angeles Galaxy, Colorado Rapids and Kansas City Wizards (now Sporting Kansas City) in Major League Soccer.
Last season the Fire's second friendly was against the immensely popular Guadalajara Chivas, the Mexican side winning 1-0 in a spirited match.
On the pitch the Fire welcomed Dutch forward Sherjill MacDonald. A 10-year veteran with teams in Belgium, the Netherlands and England, MacDonald has long been reported heading to the Fire. His last club was Beerschot AC of Belgium, where he had 15 goals in 82 matches. During his long career in Europe the 27-year old MacDonald scored 47 goals in 217 matches.
"We have followed Sherjill's career over the course of the last year, and he adds to our attacking options," said Javier Leon, president of soccer operations for the Fire. "He's a professional on the field and in the locker room."
MacDonald will occupy a Designated Player spot with the Fire. The last to hold that slot was Uruguayan forward Federico Puppo. He was loaned to Defensor Sporting Club of the Uruguayan league to set the stage for MacDonalds arrival.
Designated Player spots are usually reserved for high-profiles players. The Fire's previous DPs were Cuauhtemoc Blanco, who made a big contribution for parts of three seasons, and Nery Castillo and Freddy Ljungberg, who did not.
Puppo didn't, either. He played in 12 matches across MLS and the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup competitions, starting only two. He had a goal and an assist and was more recently hampered by an ankle injury. It's doubtful MacDonald will make an immediate impact, either. He needs time to improve his fitness before hell likely play in an MLS match.
The Fire hasn't given up on the 25-year old Puppo, who joined the club on Jan. 11 after playing for another Uruguayan side, Danubio FC.
"This loan is an opportunity to provide Federico with more consistent playing time," said Fire coach Frank Klopas. "We look forward to keeping a close eye on his progress while he's playing in Montevideo."
The Fire (9-7-4) played its last MLS match on July 18, a 1-0 road loss to the New York Red Bulls, and will resume league play against powerhouse San Jose (13-5-4). The Fire will be without a key player. Midfielder Marco Pappa will serve a one-game suspension for yellow card point accumulations.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Will Bears actually trade Alshon Jeffery?


SportsTalk Live Podcast: Will Bears actually trade Alshon Jeffery?

Brian Hedger (, Teddy Greenstein (Chicago Tribune) and Rich Campbell (Chicago Tribune) join Chuck Garfien on the panel.

The Bears reluctantly go back to Jay Cutler as the starter. Meanwhile, can the Bears actually trade Alshon Jeffery?

The guys give their predictions for the Bulls season, Hedger dissects the Blackhawks penalty kill problems and Teddy explains why Michigan will win the Big Ten.

Listen to the SportsTalk Live Podcast below:

Could Cubs start Kyle Schwarber in World Series game at Wrigley Field?

Could Cubs start Kyle Schwarber in World Series game at Wrigley Field?

CLEVELAND — “No, not right now,” Kyle Schwarber said without hesitation when asked if playing the outfield would be a possibility. The Cubs had just lost their first World Series game in 71 years, with Schwarber showing a minimal amount of rust for someone who hadn’t seen big-league action in more than six months.

Hitting with a brace wrapped around his surgically repaired left knee, Schwarber blasted a double off Cy Young Award winner Corey Kluber and split his matchups against nasty lefty reliever Andrew Miller (walk/strikeout) during Tuesday’s 6-0 loss to the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field.

Schwarber keeps smashing all expectations, returning from a gruesome outfield collision that was supposed to keep him sidelined until winter ball — and then a return to the 2017 Opening Day lineup if everything went smoothly.

Manager Joe Maddon promised reporters that they would be surprised by how well Schwarber runs now. Schwarber estimated that video from his Arizona Fall League tune-up represented “about 50 percent” of what he could actually do.

So when the World Series shifts on Friday to Wrigley Field — where the designated hitter will no longer be an option — could the Cubs start Schwarber in the outfield?

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

“I have no idea,” Maddon said before Wednesday’s Game 2. “I just want to keep an open mind. But I could keep as open of a mind as I possibly can — it’s up to the doctors to say what he can and cannot do. I would imagine that him playing and coming in today feeling normal is a positive.

“(With) his play tonight — and then we have a day off tomorrow — we can probably reevaluate. I have no proprietary information regarding what a doctor really thinks about this.

“So if it’s brought up to us, and the doc thinks he can ... but I’ve not even asked that question yet to the doctor. We were just trying to get one thing done at a time.”

The Cubs will at least have Schwarber looming as a dangerous pinch-hitter who generated five home runs and a 1.308 OPS during last year’s playoffs. Everything from that clutch performance to his middle-linebacker build to his show-choir video from high school endeared him to Cubs fans.

Just showing Schwarber’s face on the Wrigley Field video board would get a reaction during a random game in the regular season, when he essentially acted like a cheerleader in the dugout. Now imagine him walking up to home plate in the World Series.

“The fans are going to go berserk,” Maddon said. “Our fans really appreciate how hard he worked to get back for this moment. Not everybody would have done that. That’s a tough injury to come back from — really tough — and to accelerate his recovery as much as he (did) speaks to him and the training staff. And I think our fans will appreciate that.”