Should fans continue booing the Bears at home?

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Should fans continue booing the Bears at home?

The Bears have dropped five of their last six games, culminating in a fall from grace as the No. 2 seed in the NFC to currently on the outside looking in at the conference's playoff race.

And Bears fans are none too happy about it, as evidenced by the loud boos cascading from all corners of Soldier Field during Sunday's loss to heated rival Packers.

Many in Chicago took to Twitter or Facebook or the nearest water cooler in calling for head coach Lovie Smith's head, demanding the mild-mannered field general be fired and replaced with the likes of Bill Cowher or Jon Gruden.

And while fans are certainly justified in their despair and frustration, is booing the team at home really something that should continue?

Brian Urlacher, who has spent his entire career in Chicago, was visibly miffed after the game at the fans' reaction.

"Two of the people I don't care about -- fans or media," Urlacher told Lou Canellis on WFLD after the game Sunday night before defending Smith for a while.

"Our crowd was pretty good today for the most part. They were loud for a minute there -- the boos were really loud -- which is always nice. The only team in our division that gets booed at home is us. It's unbelievable to me."

Urlacher has a point. And this isn't the first time a member of the Bears has had an issue with the Soldier Field faithful this season. Just ask Jay Cutler.

But there's also the opposite side of the coin.

Chicago is a city divided in the summer, but united in the fall and winter. It's always Cubs-Sox in June and July, but when the Bears start getting into the thick of their season, it brings Chicagoans together.

This is a city that has grown weary with disappointment by the sports teams over the past year.

The Cubs may have a brand new front office, but they still approached the franchise record for losses in a season with 101 defeats in 2012.

The White Sox led the AL Central for most of the '12 season before collapsing down the stretch and giving way to the Detroit Tigers.

The Bulls held the best record in the NBA during the 2011-12 regular season, but saw superstar Derrick Rose go down to a torn ACL in the first playoff game at the United Center.

The Blackhawks are in the midst of a nasty NHL lockout that has extended more than 90 days and has hockey fans legitimately concerned that there may, in fact, not be a season at all.

And then there's the Bears. They rode a five-game win streak to a 7-3 record last season before an injury to Cutler knocked them all the way out of the playoff race. A similar occurrence is taking place this year, as the Bears have fallen to 8-6 after a 7-1 start.

But it still begs the question, should fans continue to boo the Bears at home, or should they be more like the home crowd at Lambeau Field for Packers games or at Mall of America Field for Vikings games? (I find it hard to believe the Lions are not booed at home given the struggles of that franchise over the past decade or so.)

Or are the fans in the right, especially considering the Bears have dropped six straight games to the Packers, their heated rivals?

For at least one Badger, loss to Penn State hurts more than 59-0 blowout vs. Buckeyes

For at least one Badger, loss to Penn State hurts more than 59-0 blowout vs. Buckeyes

INDIANAPOLIS — Wisconsin's last two trips to Indy have not gone well.

Back in 2014, the Badgers were favored heading into their Big Ten Championship Game showdown with Ohio State only to get absolutely destroyed, 59-0.

Saturday night, ranked one spot ahead of opposing Penn State, Wisconsin blew a three-touchdown lead and lost the Big Ten title to the Nittany Lions, 38-31.

It's hard to imagine anything being worse than a 59-0 blowout, but for at least one Badger in the immediate aftermath of this latest loss, this time around hurts more.

"I think it hurt me a little bit more because this is it for me," Wisconsin defensive back Sojourn Shelton said after the game Saturday night. "And I know a lot of guys in that locker room, it’s what we’ve been through. We came back after the bowl game (at the end of last season), we accepted the task of everything that we did, the schedule and everything. This one hurt."

They say it's better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, though the opposite might be true for leads in a football game. Perhaps it is better to never have led at all than to have a three-touchdown advantage cleared away by an unstoppable juggernaut of an offense that was Penn State on Saturday night.

It was the Badgers who were in complete control early. Corey Clement had a 67-yard touchdown run, the defense was forcing turnovers and scored a touchdown, and it looked like Wisconsin would avenge its 59-0 defeat the last time it was here in similar blowout fashion. But then the Lions turned it on, quarterback Trace McSorley and his bevy of pass-catchers made one highlight-reel play after another and cashed in on four straight touchdown drives.

The Wisconsin lead was gone, and the Badgers looked shell-shocked.

"This one’s tough. Especially just the way that we were rolling in the first half," Shelton said. "It’s tough right now. I can’t go back or anything. Time is going to keep moving. Let it hurt, just move on. It’s the only thing you can do."

Much like Penn State, Wisconsin wasn't supposed to make it this far. The Badgers had a seemingly impossible schedule when the season started, opening against LSU and staring down a stretch of games against Michigan State, Michigan, Ohio State, Iowa and Nebraska to open conference play. But Wisconsin survived it, losing just twice to two top-five teams in Ohio State and Michigan and only by a combined 14 points. The Badgers were hands down one of the best defenses in the country, and had they won Saturday night, we might be talking about them as a potential College Football Playoff team.

Instead, it's all what could've been, just like in 2014.

"I think it just hurt so much because I know the work we’ve put in behind the closed doors, the weight room, all the early morning workouts. For us to come up short like this, that’s where it really stings," Shelton said. "I’m not going to say 'bump the Playoff,' but I just think we worked too hard to come up short.

"For the group behind us, let it be a lesson. They’ll be ready."

An awful lot happened after losing to Ohio State two years ago. Head coach Gary Andersen left for Oregon State, athletics director Barry Alvarez coached the team to a big win over Auburn in the Outback Bowl, and Paul Chryst returned as the team's new head coach.

The questions always come after a loss like this about "getting up" for the bowl game. Shelton doesn't think that will be a problem. Why? Because these Badgers have done it before.

"We’ve been here before. Same stadium, worse loss. We’ll bounce back."

Blackhawks recall Johansson, assign Schmaltz

Blackhawks recall Johansson, assign Schmaltz

The Blackhawks will be without their No. 1 goaltender for a few weeks, so the obvious backup call-up came on Sunday morning.

At the same time, the Blackhawks are going to give one of their forwards a little work in the minors.

The Blackhawks recalled goaltender Lars Johansson from the Rockford IceHogs on Sunday morning. They also assigned forward Nick Schmaltz to the IceHogs.

Johansson has a 6-7-1 mark with 2.63 goals-against average and .911 save percentage in 16 games. This comes one day after Corey Crawford had an appendectomy in Philadelphia prior to the Blackhawks’ 3-1 loss there. Crawford, according to the team, is expected to be out 2-3 weeks.

[SHOP: Gear up, Blackhawks fans!]

Schmaltz has a goal and three assists in 26 games with the Blackhawks this season. Schmaltz is one of several forwards who got a top-line opportunity this season and, much like most of the others, couldn’t stick there. He has struggled to find a consistent game.

The Blackhawks face the Winnipeg Jets on Sunday night. Scott Darling is expected to get the start.