Bears doing good stuff


Bears doing good stuff

Its too easy to gloss over the little Bears things that happen away from Halas Hall that are worth mentioning. There are a few this week:

The Bears and some league rules dont allow rookie hazing but Chairman George McCaskey is putting the top of the 2012 class doing some dirty work, literally. McCaskey and draft picks Shea McClellin, Alshon Jeffery and Brandon Hardin will get together Friday morning with other volunteers and plant new trees and shrubs at LaFollette Park, 1333 N. Laramie in Chicago (When the chairman says, Lets go plant some trees! its volunteering, right? Just kidding it is, actually).

The work runs from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and is part of the organizations Save Da Planet program that involves a number of organizations dedicated to conservation and sustainability.

Cornerback Charles Tillman seems to be taking his first selection to the Pro Bowl seriously. Tillman is hosting the Pro BOWLer Charity Fundraiser Thursday evening from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Kings Lakes Lounge & Sports, 5505 Park Place, MB Financial Park in Rosemont.

The bowling fundraiser is intended to benefit the Charles Tillman Cornerstone Foundation and its work to improve the lives of critically and chronically ill children. Teammates including Gabe Carimi, Chris Conte, Devin Hester, Tim Jennings, Nick Roach, Craig Steltz, Matt Toeaina and Major Wright are expected, along with ex-Bears Anthony Adams, Alex Brown and John Tait.

Report: Bears looking for Jay Cutler return against Vikings; Matt Barkley on stand-by

Report: Bears looking for Jay Cutler return against Vikings; Matt Barkley on stand-by

FOX insider Jay Glazer confirmed on Sunday that the Bears expect quarterback Jay Cutler will be back from his sprained thumb and able to start against the Minnesota Vikings next Monday night in Soldier Field.

That would put Matt Barkley back where he has been pretty much his entire three-plus-year NFL career. Waiting.

That's the Bears want what every team wants – a young quarterback in the developmental pipeline – is no secret. Ryan Pace is among the NFL executives who speak of drafting a quarterback as much as every year, even if they don’t.

Could the Bears already have that player on their roster?

If Barkley, who was pressed into service when Brian Hoyer went down with a broken arm in last Thursday’s loss to the Green Bay Packers, is in fact that player, he might not be surprised. But the rest of the NFL would be.

"I'm confident that no matter where I am or what the deal is,” Barkley said, after going 6-for-15 with no TD’s and two interceptions, “I can play in this league.”

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

He may be one of the few still holding onto that belief. The Bears picked up Barkley after the Arizona Cardinals discarded him in early September. The Cardinals didn’t see Barkley as even a practice-squad option, which the Bears did and where Barkley was working before Cutler’s thumb injury forced the Bears to sign him to the active roster.

“The [Bears] personnel people thought he was a taller [6-2] guy that stood in the pocket pretty well,” said coach John Fox. “A guy that we thought we could work with, that had some experience and, hopefully, he got a little bit more experience [at Green Bay].”

Barkley has gone from possible No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to just another touted USC quarterback who failed or were no better than just-OK at the NFL level (Todd Marinovich, Rob Johnson, Matt Leinart, Mark Sanchez), who has thrown 65 NFL passes, none for a touchdown and six that were intercepted, including two in the Bears’ 26-10 loss last Thursday in Green Bay.

The question for Barkley at this point in his career is whether Chicago is his last stop and/or chance. Fourth-round draft picks have played their ways into prominence (Kirk Cousins in Washington, Dak Prescott in Dallas, even Sonny Jurgensen and Norm Van Brocklin if you want to find Hall of Famers), but Barkley has the added challenge of being on his third team and learning yet another offense after beginning this season running Houston and Philadelphia plays for the Bears’ defense.

Barkley offered no excuses for his poor showing (18.3 passer rating). Sort of.

“It definitely would be more beneficial [to have gotten more snaps before Green Bay],” Barkley said. “I’m not going to say what Coach should do; that’s his decision and you’ve got to deal with what you’re dealt.

“Just since I’ve been here, you know, scout-team reps and trying to put our plays into what we’re seeing on cards, you try to do every little thing you can to get better no matter what you’re doing. That’s no excuse.”

Buckeyes not dead by a long shot, but this much is clear: Michigan is Big Ten's top dog


Buckeyes not dead by a long shot, but this much is clear: Michigan is Big Ten's top dog

Make no mistake, Ohio State isn’t out of the championship running because it lost one game on an October night in Happy Valley.

But here’s perhaps the biggest thing we learned on Saturday night: Michigan is the team to beat in the Big Ten.

The Wolverines didn’t prove that all by themselves, of course, because a 41-8 win over lowly Illinois is nothing special to a team in the national-title hunt. But with the Buckeyes falling in stunning fashion to Penn State, a comparison can start to be drawn.

We got a glimpse last weekend, when Ohio State couldn’t turn in nearly the same shut-down performance against Wisconsin that Michigan had two weeks prior. The Wolverines almost completely silenced the Badgers when the two met in Ann Arbor, a 14-7 win for Michigan in which it looked absolutely unbeatable on the defensive side and was a few missed field goals away from holding a much bigger lead. In its matchup with Wisconsin, the Ohio State defense showed up, too, particularly after halftime. But the Badgers still scored more than triple the points they did against the Wolverines and racked up more than 300 yards in the first half alone. The Buckeyes won and looked good doing it, but they looked nowhere near as good as the Wolverines did.

Then came Saturday night, when Ohio State struggled on offense despite some good raw numbers in terms of yardage. And the Penn State defense pressured the heck out of Heisman candidate J.T. Barrett, sacking him six times including on Ohio State’s final two offensive plays of the evening. These Lions are the same that the Wolverines scorched by a 49-10 score in late September. Michigan allowed Penn State to gain just 191 total yards in that game and sacked Trace McSorley six times, all while scoring nearly 50 points on 515 total yards.

Now, a few points.

The main difference when it comes to comparing the two games against Wisconsin and Penn State is that Michigan was at home for both and Ohio State was on the road for both. That’s a big difference, sure.

But the other point is that the Wolverines are doing this to everybody. They are obliterating the competition. Outside of the Wisconsin game — a game against a top-11 team with one of the best defenses in college football — every win has been a blowout. Including the Wisconsin game, the average margin of victory is 38.7. Excluding it, the average margin of victory is 44.

Michigan ranks No. 1 in the country in scoring defense, allowing an average of 10 points a game, and ranks No. 3 in the country in scoring offense, averaging a whopping 48.7 points per game. There doesn’t seem to be a weakness to this team, and there are no “yeah, but” arguments to be found, especially after what Ohio State did against Wisconsin and Penn State, two teams Michigan effectively dominated.

Jim Harbaugh’s crew is barreling toward playing for a national championship, it would seem. Of course, those Buckeyes still stand in the way, and should Ohio State take care of its business between now and the regular season’s final week — easier said than done with undefeated Nebraska still on the schedule — then The Game will be the Big Ten title game play-in we all thought it would be.

That game will still be a clash of the titans. But right this second, there’s a favorite. And it’s Michigan.