Bulls' patience in hectic times should pay off

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Bulls' patience in hectic times should pay off

Bulls management hasn't made waves in NBA free agency thus far the way some observers expected, and for that, fans of the team should be somewhat grateful.

While the departure of Kurt Thomas to Portland and Keith Bogans being unlikely to return to Chicago subtract two important, if underappreciated veterans from last season's cohesive, 62-win regular-season squad that advanced to the Eastern Conference Finals, at least the organization has generally steered clear of a bizarre post-lockout period that's already been wilder than Saturday's ugly Xavier-Cincinnati brawl.

While general manager Gar Forman didn't exactly deny the team's interest in acquiring disgruntled (or not?) Magic All-Star center Dwight Howard, the fact that detailed information of the organization's pursuit of the reigning three-time Defensive Player of the Year hasn't leaked means that either the front office is doing an excellent job of playing its cards close to the vest or Forman's claim of wanting to keep the club's nucleus together is accurate.

Besides, with the hullabaloo Howard has caused as of late--an alleged meeting in Miami with the Nets' braintrust, reportedly asking for a trade, insisting he'd prefer to remain in Orlando, but only if changes are made--is drama the Bulls can do without, especially at the risk of irritating speculated trade bait Joakim Noah and Luol Deng, among others, just before a season in which they are expected to be a title contender.

Instead, the focus has been on making less high-profile additions, such as veteran shooting guard Richard Hamilton, who was officially waived by the Pistons on Monday, is expected to sign for the mid-level exception--two years for 10 million--and should be in Chicago this week, likely by Wednesday. While Hamilton has declined from his past All-Star days, he offers a legitimate scoring threat next to Derrick Rose, championship experience, solid team defensive principles and allows Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau to keep the effective "Bench Mob" second unit intact.

Another subtle move made by management was re-signing Brian Scalabrine, a reliable locker-room presence and pseudo-assistant coach, to a non-guaranteed contract; the veteran forward reportedly settled his situation with FIBA after playing professionally in Italy during the lockout.

Most importantly, however, the Bulls will likely soon agree to terms with Rose, the youngest MVP in NBA history, on a five-year contract extension, made more lucrative as a product of his namesake rule, negotiated in the newly-ratified CBA.

Forget how the Bulls' patience, rather than rushing into an ill-advised bidding war for a mediocre crop of free agents (Hamilton is still at least close to the same level of many of the so-called top players at the position on the market), has already paid off; their wise choice to stay out of the chaotic mix to chase Howard--let alone Chris Paul (whose trade to a second L.A. team seemingly won't happen, this time because the league reportedly pushed the Clippers for one asset too many in promising young guard Eric Gordon for the NBA-owned Hornets; perhaps to encourage Paul to remain in New Orleans?) or Chauncey Billups (the floor general, amnestied by the Knicks, was snatched off waivers by the aforementioned Clippers, in the wake of the veteran's weekend comments to Yahoo about being frustrated by the situation), not that either of those players were options for Chicago--and virtually stand pat, assuming the Hamilton deal gets done and they add a veteran big man, so far looks to be a winner.

While teams like defending champion Dallas (adding productive veterans Lamar Odom, Vince Carter and Delonte West), New York (former Bulls center Tyson Chandler via the Mavericks, with the potential Cavaliers amnesty casualty Baron Davis looming), Miami (Shane Battier and a wild card in another ex-Bulls center, Eddy Curry) and even Indiana (underrated power forward David West, erstwhile Bulls talking point O.J. Mayo and draft-day acquisition George Hill) have certainly improved, the team with the league's top record last season--as Rose said Sunday, "Maybe people forgot"--will be just fine.

No deals, but Bulls hardly stagnant on wild first day of free agency

No deals, but Bulls hardly stagnant on wild first day of free agency

The NBA’s new money infused through some lucrative television contracts ushered in a new economic climate and frankly, a different NBA on Day 1 of free agency.

The Bulls have been largely on the outside looking in as far as activity, with numerous nine-figure contracts being handed out and none by the team that plays on the West Side — though it would be a stretch to say they haven’t been affected or that they’ve been stagnant.

Free-agent point guard Rajon Rondo met with the Bulls in Chicago, but there wasn’t a sense a deal is coming, along with various reports of Chicago native Dwyane Wade talking with the Bulls as he appears dissatisfied with the offers he’s received from the Miami Heat — and apparently the Bulls are one of many who are courting the sure-fire Hall-of-Famer, according to Yahoo! Sports.

The conversations with Wade — and to a lesser degree, Rondo — signify a deviation from general manager Gar Forman and coach Fred Hoiberg’s recent public declarations that they would like to get younger, faster and more athletic while adding more shooting.

Wade is 34, a career 28-percent 3-point shooter and plays the same position as Jimmy Butler. Rondo led the league in assists last year in Sacramento (11.7 per game) but is 30, a career 29-percent 3-point shooter and has had run-ins with various coaches, including being banished by Dallas coach Rick Carlisle in the 2015 playoffs.

Elite talents to be sure, but one wonders how they fit into the Bulls’ immediate plans given the identity has gone through a jarring change in the last week or so.

[MORE BULLS TALK: E'Twaun Moore signs four-year deal with Pelicans]

Joakim Noah’s exit, while inevitable given the direction of the franchise and the way the last year played out for Noah, still stung as he agreed to a four-year, $72 million deal with the New York Knicks, joining Derrick Rose.

Noah’s energy and voice became the identity of the Bulls after he was drafted in 2007. Arriving before Rose and years before Tom Thibodeau strolled into town, Noah embodied a hard-playing style the Bulls prided themselves on up until recently.

He took advantage of the league’s new economic realities, as did a player the Bulls had hopes of keeping in E’Twaun Moore, a valuable reserve guard who blossomed when given the opportunity.

The Bulls wanted to keep Moore and believed their offer, which took advantage of the franchise owning Moore’s "Early Bird Rights," would be satisfactory in retaining him, despite the courtship of teams like the New Orleans Pelicans and Milwaukee Bucks.

Moore accepted a four-year, $34 million deal with the Pelicans, giving him both the average annual salary he was seeking while also securing him that precious fourth year, considering Moore was a late second-round pick in 2011 and played for three teams in his five-year professional career.

According to a source, the Bulls offered Moore a three-year deal around $21 million, the limit given the Bulls wanted to preserve a maximum salary slot with their needs at point guard and small forward. And it was likely the Bulls didn’t want to commit a fourth year to Moore, given the East Chicago, Ind., native just turned 27 in February.

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

When players like Matthew Dellavedova (restricted free agent) signed for $38.4 million over four years on an offer sheet from the Bucks a couple hours before Moore’s news came down, it became increasingly difficult to envision Moore in a Bulls uniform next season, though they’ll certainly miss him.

Next to Butler, he was the Bulls’ most rugged and versatile perimeter defender while steadily hitting jumpers to the tune of 45 percent from 3-point range. And given the way the Bulls’ locker room often seemed unhinged last season, Moore was a model of consistency, staying professional and not getting dragged into any drama.

Day 1 of free agency produced some wild numbers, with the roller-coaster just beginning — and at some point, the Bulls will take their turn on it, simply because they have to.

Report: It's a four-year deal between Joakim Noah and the Knicks

Report: It's a four-year deal between Joakim Noah and the Knicks

It was made known before the clock struck midnight on NBA free agency that Joakim Noah was likely heading to New York, and Friday night, Noah reportedly agreed to a four-year deal with the Knicks.

ESPN reported Noah and the Knicks agreed to a four-year pact worth $72 million, quite the long-term commitment from Phil Jackson to a player who missed all but 29 games last season and has appeared in more than 67 games just once in the last seven seasons.

Noah heads to the Knicks to re-team with Derrick Rose, who the Bulls traded last week in exchange for Robin Lopez, Jose Calderon and Jerian Grant.

Noah had a pair of recent All-Star seasons with the Bulls in 2012-13 and 2013-14, earning NBA Defensive Player of the Year honors and getting named to the All-NBA First Team in 2013-14, when he averaged a career-best 12.6 points per game and 11.3 rebounds per game.

But injuries kept him off the court often during the past two seasons, with him missing 15 regular-season games in 2014-15 and only appearing in 29 contests (with just two starts) in Fred Hoiberg's first season in Chicago.

In nine seasons with the Bulls, Noah averaged 9.3 points per game and 9.4 rebounds per game.

Noah and Rose both depart the Bulls for the Knicks, where they figure to start alongside Carmelo Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis.

E'Twaun Moore signs four-year deal with Pelicans

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E'Twaun Moore signs four-year deal with Pelicans

E'Twaun Moore has agreed to a four-year deal worth $34 million with the New Orleans Pelicans, agent Mark Bartlestein told Bulls Insider Vincent Goodwill.

Moore spent the last two seasons with the Bulls, putting together a career year last season in a reserve role. The 27-year-old shooting guard averaged 7.5 points, 2.3 rebounds and 1.7 assists in 59 games, including 22 starts.

General manager Gar Forman said during the offseason the Bulls had interest in bringing back Moore, who's capable of playing both guard positions. But when free agency began Thursday night at 11:01 p.m., Moore's suitors came calling. It was reported that six teams, including New Orleans, were interested in the two-way guard.

In New Orleans he'll join a backcourt that is losing Eric Gordon to free agency and could lose both Jrue Holiday and Tyreke Evans the following year. The Pelicans drafted shooting guard Buddy Hield with the No. 6 pick in last month's NBA Draft.