Cubs keep their eyes on Epstein and Friedman

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Cubs keep their eyes on Epstein and Friedman

As the Cubs go down this road, they could reach the point of no return. Really, will they find anyone better out there?

That doesnt mean there is only one truly qualified candidate who can do the job. Remember that before Theo Epstein broke the curse and became immortal, he was 28 years old, with zero experience as a general manager.

The Red Sox took a chance on Epstein, who had spent only a few months as Bostons assistant general manager when he came to power in late November 2002.

Epstein was educated at Yale University and the University of San Diego Law School. He had worked in communications and baseball operations for the San Diego Padres after getting his start as a summer intern with the Baltimore Orioles.

Epstein was part of the new wave of young baseball executives crashing into front offices all around the game. In the past nine seasons, the Red Sox have made the playoffs six times and captured two World Series titles. Theyve won at least 90 games seven times and never less than 86.

Its hard to believe that Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts a careful, deliberate businessman who has told employees that hiring a new general manager will take awhile would make a quick, impulsive decision.

Asking for permission to speak with Epstein who has another year left on his contract is one step. If it comes to this, the expectation is that the Red Sox would try to drive a hard bargain and ask for a high-impact, major-league player as compensation.

Internally, the Cubs have also discussed Rays executive Andrew Friedman, and whether hed be willing to leave Tampa Bay and prove himself in a big market.

Even Stuart Sternberg, the teams principal owner, sounded restless after only 28,299 fans showed up at Tropicana Field for Tuesdays elimination game against the Texas Rangers.

This is untenable as a model going forward, Sternberg told reporters inside the losing clubhouse.

Sternbergs words were even stronger in a St. Petersburg Times column, which quoted him as saying: It won't be my decision, or solely my decision. But eventually, major-league baseball is going to vaporize this team. It could go on nine, 10, 12 more years. But between now and then, it's going to vaporize this team. Maybe a check gets written locally, maybe someone writes me a check (to buy the team). But it's going to get vaporized.

Sternberg and Friedman both used to work on Wall Street and theyre said to be tight. Epsteins relationship with Red Sox team presidentchief executive officer Larry Lucchino seems to be more complicated. For years, theyve been portrayed in the Boston media as both rivals and mentor-protg. It could be time for a new challenge.

Epstein is only 37 years old, but he has already spent more than half his life (20 seasons) inside the big leagues. He once briefly left the Red Sox in late October 2005, formally returning to the organization by January 2006. The Cubs could offer a direct report to ownership and the entire run of baseball operations.

While the Rays charged into the playoffs, the Red Sox endured a stunning September collapse. Manager Terry Francona has already been singled out for blame and wont return next season. Its not necessarily a slam dunk that hed become a package deal with Epstein, though its an intriguing idea.

Theres a theory that all the uncertainty around the Red Sox could pull Epstein back in. Francona spoke to WEEI on Wednesday and addressed his relationship with Epstein on the Boston sports radio station.

When you first start, you have that little honeymoon period, Francona told WEEI. The fact that Theo and I made it through eight years together in this environment I think shows in itself how strong our relationship was. I think there were days when he wanted to wring my neck. I dont blame him.

Youre together that much and youre in a situation where you have to give your opinion. That was always afforded. Im actually proud of our relationship. We butted heads sometimes. I think youre supposed to. But I do know when things were rough, I knew where I could go and I did that til the very end. Im proud of the way we treated each other.

Francona who said he doesnt know if he wants to manage in 2012 was asked if he could work with Epstein again.

It depends what the job is I don't want to be a clubhouse guy, Francona joked. I dont want to speak for Theo. Thats not fair. Hes got his things to take care of this week, I know. Thats his business. He knows the respect I have for him.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

The sports world woke up to some tragic news on Sunday morning.

Former major leaguer Andy Marte and Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura were both killed in separate car accidents in the Dominican Republic within an hour of each other, according to multiple reports. A Royals representative confirmed the death of 25-year-old Ventura.

The Cubs and White Sox took to Twitter to give their condolences:

Ventura was a member of the Royals from 2013-16 and won a World Series title in 2015 with Ben Zobrist and Wade Davis, who the Cubs acquired this offseason for Jorge Soler. Ventura also played with White Sox pitcher James Shields in 2013-14.

Marte, 33, played a majority of his seven-year career with the Cleveland Indians. He was teammates with Todd Hollandsworth (Atlanta 2005), Kerry Wood (Cleveland 2009-10), and Miguel Montero (Arizona 2014).

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Theo Epstein's front office is heading into Year 6 with the Cubs and they're finally talking about a pitcher as one of the organization's most exciting prospects.

That's how senior vice president of scouting and player development Jason McLeod framed his Dylan Cease report to fans at the Cubs Convention at the Sheraton Grand Chicago last weekend.

It was a tongue-in-cheek summation from McLeod after he spent the previous few minutes fawning over Cease, the Cubs' sixth round pick in 2014.

Of course, McLeod and the Cubs can poke fun at the lack of impact pitching the farm system has developed when the homegrown position players like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber just helped lead the franchise to its first World Series championship in over a century.

Cease, however, has been one of the more intriguing Cubs prospects for years — a right-handed pitcher capable of touching 101 mph on the radar gun.

"This guy is throwing lightning bolts out of his arm," McLeod said. "It's really exciting. But we also understaned he's only in Low-A this year, so he's far away."

The Cubs expect Cease to pitch for Class-A South Bend in 2017 after spending last season pitching for short-season Eugene and the 2015 campaign working in the rookie league in Arizona.

Cease — who just turned 21 in late December — put up some impressive numbers at both stops in the Cubs system, posting a 2.36 ERA and 1.165 WHIP to go along with a whopping 91 strikeouts in 68.2 innings. He also only surrendered one homer and walked more batters (41) than reached via a basehit (39).

Control is obviously an issue for Cease, but the upside is evident.

"He's so far away," McLeod said. "He's gonna go into 2017 as a starter. As with a lot of young guys, it's gonna come down to command and depend on that third pitch and the ability to land them for strikes.

"It's a special arm. He can pitch 95-100 mph with a big power curveball. He's unlike anyone else we have in our system since we've been here in terms of pure stuff."

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One fan compared Cease to Carl Edwards Jr. in terms of their lanky build and high velocity, setting McLeod up for a layup joke.

"Well, Dylan is much stronger physically than CJ is...as is everybody in this room," McLeod said as the ballroom filled with laugher. "Don't tell [CJ] I said that. 

"They have different body types, obviously. Carl is long and lanky and Dylan has probably put on 20 pounds since we drafted him, so he's more like 6-foot-2, 190."

By comparison, Edwards — who goes by "The String Bean Slinger" for his slight build — is listed at 6-foot-3, 170 pounds.

Edwards was drafted in the 48th round in 2011 and spent his whole minor-league career as a starting pitcher until the Cubs converted him to a reliever in 2015.

Cease may eventually go down the same path, but the Cubs are going to give him every opportunity to make it as a starter first.

Cease was one of the top pitchers available in the 2014 draft, but his stock took a hit when he was forced to undergo Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow while at Milton High School in Georgia.

That scared off a lot of teams — as did the potential signability issues with college offers looming — but the Cubs took a chance and have now watched Cease soar to a top prospect in the system (No. 4 by Baseball America; No. 7 by FanGraphs and Baseball Prospectus) despite the cautious approach and lack of innings in professional ball.

"We have to thank Kyle Schwarber, actually, as one of the main reasons we got to sign Dylan Cease," McLeod said. "Because we took Kyle fourth overall, we were able to save money on the selection with him, which gave us the resources to go get Dylan Cease.

"He was a Top 10 pick in the draft — a high school arm that got hurt, fell down to the fifth round and he had a commitment to Vanderbilt, I think it was, and we were able to use the money we saved from Kyle.

"Just another reason to love Kyle Schwarber."