When will Cubs start signing players?


When will Cubs start signing players?

The Cubs have their pieces in place in the front office, they have their manager, but when the hell are they going to affect the roster? When the hell are they going to practice what they preach?

If you're like me (which you're not because my mommy says I'm special), this is something that is really weighing on your mind. You see all these backups catchers just flying off the market leaving....well, leaving every single player worth a damn.

But still, I want to know. Will the Cubs go after Albert Pujols? Will they go after Prince Fielder (probably not, if you read this blog)? Is Grady Sizemore a serious option? What pitcher will they go after? Will Jed and Theo allow goats into Wrigley Field under their regime?

Serious stuff here.

Luckily, here at CSNChicago.com, we have Patrick Mooney. Now Moondog, as he has become affectionately known to some here, is a great Insider. He knows what's up.

"These past couple of days at the GM meetings in Milwaukee, Jed and Theo called it their information-gathering phase," Mooney said on CSN Thursday afternoon. "I think what you'll see is these guys aren't quite as attached to these players as obviously the previous administration was.

"So this is a time to meet with agents, talk to other executives and start laying the ground work for this winter and then everything will really come into focus around the Winter Meetings in Dallas."

The Winter Meetings run from Dec. 5-8.

So there's your answer.

Cubs set historic lineup for Game 3 of World Series

Cubs set historic lineup for Game 3 of World Series

Pay attention to this; it will be the answer to a trivia question someday.

The Cubs released their lineup for Game 3 of the World Series Friday night, aka the first World Series game at Wrigley Field in 71 years.

So commit this to memory:

1. Dexter Fowler - CF
2. Kris Bryant - 3B
3. Anthony Rizzo - 1B
4. Ben Zobrist - LF
5. Willson Contreras - C
6. Jorge Soler - RF
7. Javy Baez - 2B
8. Addison Russell - SS
9. Kyle Hendricks - P

With Kyle Schwarber unable to play the outfield, the Cubs lose his bat in the starting lineup, but he will be available off the bench as a pinch-hitter.

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The wind is expected to be gusting out all night at Wrigley, so the Cubs are opting for some power potential early with Soler in right field.

This also represents the fourth straight game in which Jason Heyward is not in the starting lineup.

Indians Game 3 starter Josh Tomlin gave up 36 homers in the regular season, an average of 1.9 homers per nine innings.

Hendricks will go up against an Indians lineup that managed just one run off Jake Arrieta and the Cubs bullpen on a frigid, wet night in Cleveland in Game 2.

Hendricks is also coming off a stellar start at Wrigley last weekend when he absolutely dominated the Dodgers to clinch the National League pennant for the Cubs. In the postseason, Hendricks has a 1.65 ERA, 0.80 WHIP and .164 batting average against.

Playing at an NL park, the Indians are rolling with normal DH Carlos Santana in the outfield:

1. Carlos Santana - LF
2. Jason Kipnis - 2B
3. Francisco Lindor - SS
4. Mike Napoli - 1B
5. Jose Ramirez - 3B
6. Lonnie Chisenhall - RF
7. Roberto Perez - C
8. Tyler Naquin - CF
9. Josh Tomlin

What life was like the last time the Cubs hosted a World Series game at Wrigley Field

What life was like the last time the Cubs hosted a World Series game at Wrigley Field

25,950 days ago.

That's how long it's been since Wrigley Field last saw a World Series game played in front of the ivy.

Sure, 71 years is a long time, but when you break it down by days, it seems even more daunting.

For starters, take a glance at a snapshot of what Wrigley - and the world - looked like on the day of the last World Series game on Chicago's North side:

#FlashbackFriday: 71 years ago, the last time Wrigley Field hosted a #WorldSeries game.

A photo posted by MLB ⚾ (@mlb) on

Obviously, that was well before Wrigley got lights (1988).

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Here's some more perspective on how stunningly different life was back in 1945:

—The average cost of a new house was $4,600.

—The average salary was $2,400 per year per person.

—Gas cost 15 cents a gallon.

—New cars were just over $1,000.

—Life expectancy was 65.9 years (life expectancy in America is 79.3 years in 2016).

—Population of the U.S. was just shy of 140 million (In 2016, America's population is more than 324 million).

—Major League Baseball had only 16 teams, including zero teams west of St. Louis.

—The Giants had yet to move to San Francisco and were still in New York. The Dodgers had yet to move to Los Angeles and still made their home in Brooklyn.

—Washington had a baseball team, but they were called the Senators, not the Nationals.

—St. Louis, Boston and Philadelphia each had two baseball teams, including the St. Louis Browns, Boston Braves and Philadelphia Athletics.

—Tigers pitcher Hal Newhouser won American League MVP honors while Cubs first baseman Phil Cavarretta took home the NL MVP with only six homers, though he did hit .355 with a .949 OPS.

—The first Super Bowl was still 22 years away from being played.

Among world events, 1945 was also when Adolf Hitler died, Germany surrendered in World War II and the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Japan.

America was also getting used to Harry S. Truman as president after Franklin D. Roosevelt died in office in April 1945.

Of course, if we go as far back as the last time the Cubs won the World Series, life would be quite a bit different even in the 37 years between 1908 and 1945.