Hahn faces important decision-making this offseason


Hahn faces important decision-making this offseason

The White Sox dont have enough payroll available to make a significant move, but there appears to be wiggle room to solve most of their issues.
General manager Rick Hahn said as much on a conference call on Thursday afternoon, several days before he and his front office head to Nashville, Tenn. for the winter meetings.
Earlier this month, the White Sox newly promoted general manager indicated the clubs 2013 payroll would roughly be the same as last season. The teams opening day payroll in 2012 was nearly 98 million.
With 10 players under contract for almost 90 million, possibly 7-8 million due in deals for Alejandro De Aza, Gordon Beckham and Dayan Viciedo, and another 12 players to sign, the White Sox would currently require at least 103-104 million for next season before they could address their third base opening externally.
But Hahn said Thursday the team has some flexibility and wouldnt have to offload salary in order to complete its 25-man roster --- for the most part.
We dont have to move salary to make some of the moves that are on our list, Hahn said. To make a large move, where we take on a great deal of money, then yes, wed likely have to make a move elsewhere to free up some cash to make a major, major acquisition. But right now there is room within the payroll to maneuver and address some of our needs.
The White Sox say they would love to bring back free agents A.J. Pierzynski and third baseman Kevin Youkilis. But the catcher should receive a raise from last season, when he earned 6 million and hit a career-high 27 home runs and Youkilis is the top third baseman available this offseason. Both would likely fall under the large move category defined by Hahn, which would require another move to offset salary.
So where would that move come from? Most likely the teams pitching, which Hahn said continues to draw significant trade interest. With Jake Peavy, John Danks and Gavin Floyd already signed and Chris Sale, Jose Quintana and Hector Santiago under team control, the White Sox have depth in the starting rotation. They also have a decent stable of relief pitchers with Jesse Crain and Matt Thornton signed and Addison Reed, Nate Jones, Donnie Veal, Brian Omogrosso and Co. under team control.
An above-.500 pitcher who is due to earn 9.9 million next season, the final year before he become a free agent, Floyd is clearly one of Hahns most attractive trade pieces. Crain or Thornton also might attract offers and would bring some relief.
I think other clubs see us as having some depth and obviously some young guys who have some success and in a position of perhaps having excess, Hahn said. Were not inclined to go out there and trim away at that depth. We have some pride and comfort in that depth. But those tend to be the focal points of at least the majority of those calls and if something were to happen via trade that would likely be the area that we wound up dealing from.
But Hahn said theres no rush to make any moves, either via free agency or through trade. He emphasized the White Sox will continue to monitor the markets for Youkilis and Pierzynski and determine whether or not their internal options are more cost efficient than signing one of the veterans.
You dont get added points for getting a deal done at the winter meetings, Hahn said. Our goal is to have the best roster we can have come opening day. If that means we acquired a player in the final days of November or the final days of January, that doesnt matter to us come April.

White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs


White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs

Chuck Garfien, Slavko Bekovic and Chris Kamka react to the national media blunders that failed to recognize the White Sox as 2005 World Series champions. 

Later, the guys discuss Jerry Reinsdorf's comments about cheering for the Cubs and break down what it takes to beat the Indians. 

Check out the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast below: 

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”