Keppinger expects leg will be fine

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Keppinger expects leg will be fine

Jeff Keppinger is in good shape now but admits earlier this offseason he was worried when an X-ray revealed a broken right fibula rather than a sprained ankle.

The White Sox newest addition said Monday he expects to be ready for spring training when the team reports to Glendale, Ariz. in just over two months. The walking boot worn by Keppinger -- who signed a three-year, 12-million deal with the White Sox on Monday -- comes off Tuesday and he will start his rehab shortly thereafter.

It especially wasnt a fun time, Keppinger said. I thought I rolled my ankle and sprained it. I was wearing flip flops coming down the stairs and just slipped and thought I could catch myself and just didnt land right. I come out of (the walking boot) tomorrow and get on my way with walking and get better so I should be all good shortly. It was pretty nerve wracking.

The competition for Keppinger was heavy this offseason.

The New York Yankees were one of many teams in pursuit of Keppinger, a .288 career hitter, who, along with Dustin Pedroia and Albert Pujols, is one of three hitters with more walks and extra-base hits than strikeouts since 2007. Keppinger is tailor-made for the White Sox as general manager Rick Hahn wants his offense to be less reliant upon the long ball next season. He wants his team to be able to score even when it doesnt hit home runs. Hahn said the White Sox were high on Keppinger from the start of the offseason but the broken leg cooled the chase, at least temporarily.

It actually probably slowed things down a beat so that us and the others clubs involved could get the medical records and post-op report and the follow-up report, Hahn said. It may have slowed things down by a week or two, but there certainly was a great amount of interest in him and we were there from there the start. Once we were comfortable with the prognosis on the fracture we were right there back in it and we were able to close something off down in Nashville last week despite the fact that there was a fair amount of competition.

Keppinger heads into spring as the White Sox third baseman, though he said the club hasnt informed him of where he will play or hit. With no more than 36 strikeouts in any of his eight seasons, Keppinger appears to be a strong candidate for the second spot in the White Sox lineup. Hahn received a good report on Keppinger from assistant GM Buddy Bell, who briefly managed him in Kansas City in 2006 and likes Keppingers makeup.

Jeff adds a valuable and different type of offensive player to our lineup, Hahn said.

Keppinger likes the idea of hitting second because of the different aspects to the offensive approach. Hes a career .288 hitter.

Sometimes you have to take pitches to allow the leadoff batter to steal, Keppinger said. Other times you have to just kind of give yourself up for the team and move guys over for the three hitter. I kind of like the challenges the two hole brings. Its kind of tough sometimes to do all those little things, but I pride myself in being able to get them done.

His first task, however, is to get his right leg back up to speed. Keppinger doesnt anticipate any problems.

That was what I told by the doctors, Keppinger said. Im about to be out of the boot and healed up and basically its just strengthening the leg back up. I should be good to go come spring. That certainly all matters based on how rehab goes but I dont imagine there being any tough parts of rehab that are a struggle for me. I just need to strengthen it back up and get the flexibility back in my foot.

Rick Hahn: White Sox 'still thoroughly, deeply engaged' in trade talks as meetings close

Rick Hahn: White Sox 'still thoroughly, deeply engaged' in trade talks as meetings close

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. -- The White Sox have a pair of relievers to dangle and have become increasingly busier with two of three free-agent closers off the board.

Prior to leaving the Winter Meetings on Thursday, White Sox general manager Rick Hahn was asked if a pool of relievers including closer David Robertson and setup man Nate Jones had drawn much interest.

Having already traded Chris Sale and Adam Eaton, it’s believed the White Sox are willing to part with most anyone if the price is right. It sounds as if that possibility has improved after the Yankees’ late night signing of Aroldis Chapman on Wednesday, two days after the San Francisco Giants signed Mark Melancon. With only Kenley Jansen still left in free agency and due a big salary, Robertson, who has two years and $25 million left on his deal, could solve several teams’ relief needs. Jones is also a draw with potentially five years left on his current team-friendly deal, which includes two club options and one mutual option for 2021.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

“We’ve had a lot of interesting conversations on a number of different fronts involving are players,” Hahn said. “And yes, we still have reliever pieces and starting pieces that are appealing to various teams throughout the league. I don’t think anything is going to happen between now and the time I go pick up my bags and head to the airport. But still thoroughly engaged, deeply engaged on a number of different fronts.”

Despite adding five pitchers and two position players through their first two moves, the White Sox still have a long list of desires. That list potentially includes a long-term starting catcher and another big bat among others.

White Sox add pitcher Dylan Covey in Rule 5 draft

White Sox add pitcher Dylan Covey in Rule 5 draft

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The White Sox added another young pitcher on Thursday when they selected right-hander Dylan Covey in the Rule 5 draft.

Covey, formerly the No. 20 prospect in the Oakland A’s farm system, missed all but six starts of the 2016 regular season after he sustained an oblique injury. A fourth-round selection in 2013, Covey also made six starts in the Arizona Fall League, compiling a 4.74 ERA in 24 2/3 innings. He is the sixth pitcher added by the White Sox at the Winter Meetings this week, including five acquired in the trades for Chris Sale and Adam Eaton.

White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said Covey, who must stay on the major league roster the entire season or would potentially be offered back to Oakland, can compete for a spot in the bullpen or even the team’s rotation.

“Interesting kid,” Hahn said. “Up to 95 with some sink. Four-pitch mix. Obviously, he’s not a finished product. But we think he has a chance to compete for a spot in our bullpen or possibly even in the rotation. Long term he has starter potential and we’ll just have to wait and see how he looks when he gets to Glendale. But interesting arm and we’re interested in adding as much talent as we can to the organization.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

The White Sox added a bevy of prospects in the previous two days, including MLB.com’s top-ranked position player (Yoan Moncada) and pitcher (Lucas Giolito). The haul also includes talented pitchers Michael Kopech and Reynaldo Lopez, among others.

“It’s a weird feeling,” Hahn said. “Mixed emotions. You never like parting ways with stalwarts on this roster like Chris Sale and Adam Eaton. At the same time, we had a plan that we know is going to take some time and it’s nice to feel good about the first steps in that plan and the return which we received.”

Originally selected in the first round of the 2010 draft by the Milwaukee Brewers, Covey opted for college after he was diagnosed with Diabetes. Covey played alongside Cubs star Kris Bryant for three seasons (2011-13) and White Sox farmhand Louie Lechich at the University of San Diego before Oakland drafted him in 2013.

Covey was limited to six regular season starts in 2016 at Double-A Midland after his oblique injury. He finished 2-1 with a 1.84 ERA in 29 1/3 innings.