Alabama, Texas top recruiting class rankings

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Alabama, Texas top recruiting class rankings

Alabama's Nick Saban and Texas' Mack Brown are widely recognized as two of the slickest and most successful recruiters in college football. So it isn't surprising to see Alabama and Texas at the top of the 2012 recruiting derby.

"Nick Saban and (Ohio State's) Urban Meyer are the two best recruiters in the nation," recruiting analyst Tom Lemming of CBS Sports Network said. "Saban has a better resume than anyone else...three national championships, two at Alabama, one at LSU.

"He went out to recruit on the day after beating LSU for the national title. He takes it as a personal affront if he loses a kid to another national power. He put Alabama over the top (in this year's recruiting sweepstakes) by getting commitments from three top 100 players, all within a couple of days, a big coup."

Saban goes wherever five-star athletes take him. Last week, he showed off the Alabama campus and Crimson Tide facilities to offensive tackle Kyle Bosch of Wheaton St. Francis, one of Illinois' top-rated prospects in the class of 2013.

At Texas, Brown has the advantage of recruiting in the most fertile region for producing football talent in the country. And while he competes against virtually every major program, he dominates. This is the fifth time in the last seven years that he has signed a top three class.

What about Notre Dame? The Irish finished No. 17 in Lemming's ratings. Coach Brian Kelly got QB Gunner Kiel, the No. 2 player in the nation, and might get DB Anthony Standifer of Crete-Monee, who de-committed from Michigan. But Kelly lost every one of his top 10 choices, including multi-talented Ron Darby to Florida State. And he didn't get the left tackle he so desperately coveted.

Who will make the biggest impact in the next two or three years?

Lemming predicts Missouri-bound WR Dorial Green-Beckham, the nation's No. 1 player, will be better than former Alabama star Julio Jones, that he will be the next Randy Moss.

Lemming also predicts that Ohio State-bound DL Noah Spence, Florida State-bound DL Mario Edwards, California-bound RBDB Shaq Thompson, Texas-bound RB Jonathan Gray, Pittsburgh-bound RB Rushel Shell, uncommitted WR Stefon Diggs and USC-bound WRKR Nelson Agholor will be impact players as freshmen.

And Lemming predicts that if Oklahoma State-bound quarterback Wes Lunt of Rochester, Ill., stays healthy, he will be a Heisman Trophy candidate.

Here are the nation's top 10 recruiting classes:

1. ALABAMA: Coach Nick Saban was assured of the No. 1 ranking when he landed DB Landon Collins, RB T.J. Yeldon and WR Cyrus Jones at the last minute. He also signed 10 other top 150 players, including CB Geno Smith, DB Chris Black, DB Eddie Williams and LB Reggie Ragland. But observers noted that Saban didn't land a quarterback to fill out his talented class.

2. TEXAS: Brown signed 10 players among the top 150 in the nation, including the best running back in Jonathan Gray. Other standouts are WR Cayleb Jones, DT Malcolm Brown, QB Connor Brewer and OL Kennedy Estelle. He also welcomed DL Toshiro Davis, who de-committed from LSU.
3. OHIO STATE: If Urban Meyer's first class is any indication of future success, the Big 10 better batten down the hatches. He signed four top 100 players -- DL Noah Spence, DL Tommy Schutt of Glenbard West, DE Adolphus Washington, DL Se'Von Pittman and RB Brionte Dunn. He also got CB Armani Reeves from Penn State and OL Taylor Decker from Notre Dame.

4. MICHIGAN: New coach Brady Hoke has old-timers cheering again. He landed four top 100 players -- DE Chris Wormley, DB Terry Richardson, OL Erik Magnuson and OL Kyle Kalis. Wormley was the defensive player of the year in Ohio. DT Ondre Pipkins is another standout. He could get OL Jordan Diamond of Simeon, who will announce his decision on Friday.

5. FLORIDA: New coach Will Muschamp signed five top 100 players -- OL D.J Humphries, TE Kent Taylor, OL Jerraman Dunbar, LB Antonio Morrison of Bolingbrook, DE Jonathan Bullard and RB Matt Jones. Two others to watch are TE Colin Thompson and CB Brian Poole. Muschamp still is in the running for WR Stefon Diggs.

6. MIAMI: Coach Al Golden signed only two top 100 players, DB Deon Bush and CB Tracy Howard, but the Hurricane cleaned up in south Florida. Howard is rated as the best cornerback in the class of 2012 according to one recruiting service. RB Duke Johnson is another standout.

7. FLORIDA STATE: Coach Jimbo Fisher could argue that his class is the best in the nation. He got five top 100 players -- DL Mario Edwards, OL Eddie Goldman, QB Jameis Winston, WR Ronald Darby and RB Mario Pender. Another standout is DL Chris Casher.

8. OKLAHOMA: Coach Bob Stoops signed 23 players, including five wide receivers and four tight ends. He is high on Courtney Gardner and Sam Grant, two late commitments. He also has two top 100 pass catchers -- Durron Neal and Taylor McNamara -- and five signees in the top 150.

9. USC: What could coach Lane Kiffin have accomplished if he had been able to recruit a full class instead of just 15? He signed OL Zach Banner, WR Nelson Agholor, DL Leonard Williams, OL Jordan Simmons and OL Max Tuerk. "Quality, not quantity," Kiffin said.

10. STANFORD: Coach David Shaw lured OL Andrus Peat and OL Kyle Murphy away from USC and also signed OL Joshua Garnett, OL Graham Shuler, OL Nick Davidson, OL Johnny Caspers of Glenbard West and RB Barry Sanders, son of the NFL Hall of Famer.
The next 15: Georgia, Clemson, LSU, Texas A&M, South Carolina, Auburn, Notre Dame, Oregon, UCLA, Missouri, Texas Tech, Tennessee, California, TCU, Rutgers.

Loyola excited for upcoming season, trip to Spain

Loyola excited for upcoming season, trip to Spain

Loyola didn't have the season they were hoping for in 2015-16 but they're optimistic that things can turn around for the upcoming season. Even though the Loyola roster is filled with newcomers, the Ramblers are hopeful that a summer trip to Spain can help give them a head start.

As part of the trip, Loyola will get 10 extra practices and four games against Spanish competition that will give the team some much-needed experience before practice officially begins in October.

Head coach Porter Moser is already happy about working with this group, which features some productive returnees and a lot of talented newcomers.

"We play four games over there. They get that feel of being coached in a game at this level with their teammates," Moser said. "So then when we start back up in October they have a sense of some of the things we're trying to teach, some of the things of what to expect. And I think that's such a big element."

On a team full of new players, it will be important for senior guard Milton Doyle to have a bounce-back year for Loyola after a disappointing junior campaign. A former star at Marshall, Doyle saw his shooting percentages dip last season as the Loyola coaching staff challenged him to improve for his final season of college basketball. 

Moser is happy with the strides that Doyle has made this summer as he's added over 10 pounds of muscle to now play at 192 pounds. Also committed on the defensive end of the floor and being a team leader, Doyle is the Ramblers' only senior this season, so he'll be counted on to be a productive presence.

"It's a lot this year just because we had four seniors leave last year and I'm the last senior," Doyle said. "So it's my job to make sure everyone stays on track and everyone is uplifted, even when coaches get on them. That's my job right now."

Junior wing Donte Ingram — a former Simeon product — and junior guard Ben Richardson also return as key contributors from last year's team while Iowa State transfer guard Clayton Custer is expected to come in and be a major factor in the team's backcourt rotation.

As for the newcomers, Moser compared juco transfer forward Aundre Jackson favorably to former Loyola forward Christian Thomas while Vlatko Granic gives the team a stretch option at forward that they didn't have in the past. The team's freshmen are also very talented as guard Matt Chastain has shown solid athleticism and a good basketball IQ through some early practices. 

Another freshman guard, Cameron Satterwhite, is coming off of a torn ACL that cost him his senior season, but the Loyola staff is optimistic about his recovery for this season. Croatian freshman guard Bruno Skokna is also recovering from injury as he has played against professionals in Europe the last few seasons on an amateur contract. He is expected to be cleared soon so that he can return to action this season.

"I love this group because it's a group full of gym rats. This is a really enthusiastic group," Moser said. "They've come together, we've got a lot of newcomers. That's the benefit, that's why we did the Spain trip this summer."

Loyola takes its trip to Spain from Aug. 12-22 as they'll hit cities like Barcelona and Madrid during the trip.

Pat Summitt used the sport to empower women at Tennessee and beyond

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Pat Summitt used the sport to empower women at Tennessee and beyond

Needing yet another men's basketball coach, Tennessee officials turned to the one person they thought would be perfect to take over the Volunteers program.

Pat Summitt said no.

She wasn't interested in the job in 1994 after Wade Houston was forced out, and she turned it down again when Jerry Green quit in March 2001. A Tennessee governor once joked he wouldn't have his job if Summitt ever wanted to run her home state.

Breaking the glass ceiling in the men's game, political office, that wasn't Summitt's motivation. She had the only job she ever really wanted.

"I want to keep doing the right things for women all the time," Summitt said in June 2011 after being inducted into her fifth Hall of Fame.

Summitt died Tuesday morning at age 64.

The woman who grew up playing basketball in a Tennessee barn loft against her brothers, and started coaching only a couple years after Title IX was invoked, spent her life working to make women's basketball the equal of the men's game. In the process, Patricia Sue Head

Summitt stood amongst the best coaches in any sport when she retired in April 2012 with more victories (1,098) than any other NCAA coach and second only to John Wooden with eight national championships.

Summitt used the sport and her demand for excellence to empower women and help them believe they can achieve anything, taking no backseat to anyone.

When I moved to Tennessee in 1976, girls played six-on-six, half-court basketball designed to protect them from getting hurt. Summitt, who took her Lady Vols to four AIAW Final Fours, refused to recruit Tennessee players. Tennessee high schools switched to five-on-five rules starting with the 1979-80 season.

The NCAA finally started running a national postseason tournament for the women in 1982. At the time, Summitt was known for having "corn-fed chicks" on her roster, big and strong but not talented enough to win national titles. After she won her first national title in 1987 in her eighth Final Four either in the AIAW or NCAA, she said, "Well, the monkey's off my back."

Back then only a student ID was needed to attend a women's game. And there was no demand for the results of those games. After graduating from Tennessee, I helped the sports writers by bringing notes from an NCAA Tournament game back to the office for someone else to write up. There was no urgency since there was no reader demand.

So Summitt worked to make it impossible to ignore her team or the women's game.

By January 1993, so many people wanted to watch then-No. 2 Tennessee visit top-ranked Vanderbilt that the contest became the first Southeastern Conference women's game to sell out in advance. With children under 6 allowed in free, having a ticket didn't guarantee getting through the door; at least 1,000 were turned away at the door - including Vanderbilt's chancellor.

The Lady Vols won 73-68, a game I covered in my first year as a sports writer for The Associated Press in Nashville.

"This was the biggest game in women's basketball, and that's what I've been waiting 19 years to see," Summitt said. "I'm glad I stayed around to see it."

Summitt scheduled opponents anywhere and everywhere, barnstorming the country to introduce people to women's basketball. Tennessee played Arizona State in 2000 in the first women's outdoor game played at then-Bank One Ballpark, drew the largest crowd ever to a regional championship in March 1998 when 14,848 packed Memorial Gym in Nashville with Tennessee trying to finish off the NCAA's first three-peat and helped Louisville set a Big East record christening the KFC Yum! Center in 2010.

The Lady Vols became must-see TV in the sport as Summitt put the women's game on the national stage with six national titles in the span of 12 years.

I remember when I got real up-close look at what drove Summitt.

Assigned to cover Summitt as part of AP's annual college basketball preview package in the fall of 1998, I spent nearly 30 minutes with the coach in her office.

Door closed, Summitt gave a glimpse of that famous stay-away stare. With undivided attention now on me, she wanted to know if I had talked with her mother, Hazel, for the story. She then showed me the engaging side, laughing when asked about a stretch of play during the 1998 title game that resembled the Showtime Lakers, beaming while reflecting on how well her Lady Vols showed women could play the game.

The Lady Vols lost 69-63 to Duke that season in the East Regional. The next day I left a message at Summitt's house and late that afternoon, she called back to talk about more life lessons and basketball.

"It's a game, and winning and losing both can be great ways to teach kids how to get ready for the real world," said Summitt, who had to stop the interview because her mother had given son, Tyler, a gift. She explained he would have to save some of that cash before buying something for himself. Then she resumed the conversation about the game.

That was Pat Summitt: Hoops and family.

She held everyone to the exacting standards she learned from her father cutting tobacco and helping bale hay on the family farm. Tennessee and Connecticut was the biggest draw in women's basketball with Geno Auriemma and his Huskies handing Summitt her lone title game loss in 1995. But Summitt canceled the series in 2007 and refused to say why other than, "Geno knows."

Summitt ended a nine-year championship drought with her seventh national title in 2007 followed by the eighth in 2008. She became the first NCAA coach to win 1,000 games Feb. 5, 2009, and received a new contract that boosted her annual salary to $1.4 million - far removed from the $8,900 of her first season.

She never got to the 40th season in that contract, her career cruelly and prematurely ended by early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type. She finished 1,098-208 with 18 Final Fours, at the time tying the men of UCLA and North Carolina for the most by any college basketball program.

Not that numbers define Summitt, who once said, "Records are made to be broken."

Yes, all marks fade, but no one will eclipse Summitt's contributions to women's basketball.

Illini starting pitcher Cody Sedlock named Big Ten Pitcher of the Year

Illini starting pitcher Cody Sedlock named Big Ten Pitcher of the Year

University of Illinois starting pitcher Cody Sedlock was named the Big Ten Pitcher of the Year on Tuesday.

The junior from Sherrard, Ill., led the conference in strikeouts (116) and innings pitched (101.1).

He is the fifth Illini pitcher to take home the award, following Tyler Jay who was given the honor last year — and later went on to be picked No. 6 overall by the Minnesota Twins in the 2015 MLB draft. It's the second time in program history that an Illini pitcher has won the award in back-to-back seasons.

The right-hander Sedlock is projected by many to be a first-round selection in the upcoming MLB draft on June 9.